jaded

(redirected from jadedness)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

jad·ed

 (jā′dĭd)
adj.
1. Worn out; wearied: "My father's words had left me jaded and depressed" (William Styron).
2. Dulled by surfeit; sated: "the sickeningly sweet life of the amoral, jaded, bored upper classes" (John Simon).
3. Cynically or pretentiously callous.

jad′ed·ly adv.

jaded

(ˈdʒeɪdɪd)
adj
1. exhausted or dissipated
2. satiated
ˈjadedly adv
ˈjadedness n

jad•ed

(ˈdʒeɪ dɪd)

adj.
1. dulled or dissipated by overindulgence: a jaded appetite; a jaded reprobate.
2. worn-out or wearied, as by overwork or overuse.
[1585–95]
jad′ed•ly, adv.
jad′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.jaded - exhausted; "my father's words had left me jaded and depressed"- William Styron
tired - depleted of strength or energy; "tired mothers with crying babies"; "too tired to eat"
2.jaded - dulled by surfeit; "the amoral, jaded, bored upper classes"
satiate, satiated - supplied (especially fed) to satisfaction

jaded

adjective
1. tired, bored, weary, worn out, done in (informal), clapped out (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. informal), spent, drained, exhausted, shattered, dulled, fatigued, fed up, wearied, fagged (out) (informal), sapped, uninterested, listless, tired-out, enervated, zonked (slang), over-tired, ennuied We had both become jaded, disinterested and disillusioned.
tired fresh, keen, eager, enthusiastic, refreshed, naive, life-loving, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed (informal)
2. satiated, sated, surfeited, cloyed, gorged, glutted scrumptious little things to tickle my jaded palate
Translations
مُجْهَد، كَليل
otupělývyčerpaný
overmættræt
sljór; leiîur á öllu
išblėsęs
nodzītsnomocītsnovārdzināts
bezmiş

jaded

[ˈdʒeɪdɪd] ADJhastiado, harto
to feel jadedestar hastiado or harto
to get jadedhastiarse, hartarse

jaded

[ˈdʒeɪdɪd] adj [person] → las(lasse), blasé(e)jade-green [ˌdʒeɪdˈgriːn]
adjvert jade inv
n (= colour) → vert m inv jade

jaded

adj (physically) → matt, abgespannt; (permanently) → verbraucht, abgelebt; (= mentally dulled)stumpfsinnig, abgestumpft; (from overindulgence etc) → übersättigt; appearanceverlebt, verbraucht; palateabgestumpft

jaded

[ˈdʒeɪdɪd] adj (person) → annoiato/a, sfibrato/a
to have a jaded appetite → essere un po' svogliato/a nel mangiare

jaded

(ˈdʒeidid) adjective
(of eg a person or his interest, appetite etc) worn out and made tired and dull.
References in classic literature ?
All but frying the sausage," Rose answered, achieving a pleasant tone in spite of her jadedness.
This isn't the same young woman who emerged from her genre transition with fresh optimism-she's now a pop star through and through, exhibiting some jadedness, but also showing an entrancing confidence that was becoming apparent in her previous album, '1989.
What Sarah Bakewell has produced is a book on existentialists and existentialism that cuts through our jadedness, our I'm-not-worthy awe, and our collective inferiority complex about the lofty, superhuman intellectual heights that we assume these thinkers must have occupied.
Jadedness is to be expected, since Problems is set in the always-uncool recent past.
This was his first time entertaining the couple down the hall, and he was hoping to assert both his desirability and his jadedness about that desirability.
And, of course, that's a wise and jealous way of saying that young people fail to see how lucky they are with all their physical and intellectual energy, their optimism, passion, the absence of jadedness (and wrinkles), and the many decades of life they have stretching out before them in which they can realize their dreams and goals.
He was a non-apologetic partisan of the cinema who wrote about the movies from a place of love, not--contra far too many critics--from a place of jaundiced jadedness.
In Aus Mehemed Alis Reich, this self-absorption is carried to the point of jadedness, particularly in connection with the narrator's attitude toward Egyptians of the lower classes.
Parents whose sons and daughters were in the senior classes expressed a sense of jadedness.
His historical jadedness was integral to his upbringing; in an interview with Katie Bradshaw of Bomb magazine, he speaks about his family: 'We're like the Simpsons, if the Simpsons smoked up to a lot of Philippine history, Maoist ideologies, and post-Cold War consumerism.
As Perry concludes with a new sense of jadedness, it turns out that "science is as much a process of construction as of discovery; that scientists, too, are storytellers" (p.