jailable

jailable

(ˈdʒeɪləbəl)
adj
(of a crime, offence, etc) punishable by imprisonment
References in periodicals archive ?
Cairo: The Egyptian parliament is examining a draft bill that makes disparaging remarks on the country's historical figures a jailable offence.
Section 17 prohibits any "unauthorised interception" of "electromagnetic emissions from an information system that are carrying data," essentially criminalizing much of the practice of modern radio hams: not to mention transforming scanning for open wifi into a jailable offence.
Geeta Seshamani, co-founder of Wildlife SOS, said, "Capturing snakes and using them for display and entertainment, is banned and a jailable offence under the Wildlife Protection Act of 1972.
This experience of being pulled over and apprehended for reasons that wouldn't have even been jailable in the first place was such a common experience that it brought people together in a way that was really important," he said.
The risks consist not so much in outright fraud -- big lies that would be jailable offences -- as in more subtle forms of deception.
Under the new law, those convicted of terrorism could face the death penalty and expressions of support for terrorism are a jailable offence, according to foreign TV channel.
In Texas, for example, counsel is appointed in fewer than 20% of jailable misdemeanor cases across three-fourths of its counties.
November Farage supporters embark on the Night of the Long Cucumbers, forcing greengrocers and supermarkets to sell bendy cucumbers in a two-fingered gesture to the Eurocrats in Brussels - who, as we all know, made the sale of bendy cucumbers a jailable offence for the last 40 years.
Wisconsin because California (unlike Wisconsin) made DUIs a jailable offense).
Attempting to use a false identification is a jailable offense, she added, but police often cite and release people arrested on that charge.
Almost overnight, acts that would have been considered seditious, blasphemous, or profane, and therefore jailable offenses just a generation before, became, by the late '70s, cultural touchstones, symbols of an age defined by radical individualism.