janitor

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jan·i·tor

 (jăn′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. One who attends to the maintenance or cleaning of a building.
2. A doorman or doorwoman.

[Latin iānitor, doorkeeper, from iānua, door, from iānus, archway; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

jan′i·to′ri·al (-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
Word History: In Latin iānus was the word for "archway, gateway, or covered passage" and also for the god of gates, doorways, and beginnings in general, known in English as Janus. Our month January—a month of beginnings—is named for the god. Latin iānitor, the source of our word janitor and ultimately also from iānus, meant "doorkeeper or gatekeeper." Probably because iānitor was common in Latin records and documents, it was adopted into English. In an early quotation Saint Peter is called "the Janitor of heaven." The term can still mean "doorkeeper," but in Scots usage janitor also referred to a minor school official. Apparently this position at times involved maintenance duties and doorkeeping, and the maintenance duties took over the more exalted tasks, giving us the position of janitor as we know it today.

janitor

(ˈdʒænɪtə)
n
1. Scot and US and Canadian the caretaker of a building, esp a school
2. chiefly US and Canadian a person employed to clean and maintain a building, esp the public areas in a block of flats or office building; porter
[C17: from Latin: doorkeeper, from jānua door, entrance, from jānus covered way (compare Janus1); related to Latin īre to go]
janitorial adj
ˈjanitress, ˈjanitrix fem n

jan•i•tor

(ˈdʒæn ɪ tər)

n.
1. a person employed in an apartment house, office building, school, etc., to keep the public areas clean and do minor repairs; caretaker.
2. Archaic. a doorkeeper or porter.
[1575–85; < Latin jānitor doorkeeper =jāni-, comb. form of jānus doorway, covered passage + -tor -tor]
jan`i•to′ri•al (-ˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.janitor - someone employed to clean and maintain a buildingjanitor - someone employed to clean and maintain a building
custodian, keeper, steward - one having charge of buildings or grounds or animals

janitor

noun caretaker, porter, custodian, concierge, doorkeeper My mother was the janitor in the town school.
Translations
حَاجِبٌحارِس بِنايَه
domovník-icevrátný
pedelportnervicevært
talonmiesvahtimestarihuoltomiesovimies
pazikuća
gondnokházfelügyelőkapusportás
húsvörîur
用務員
수위
šveicarsvārtsargs
hišnik
vaktmästare
ภารโรง
người trông coi

janitor

[ˈdʒænɪtəʳ] N (= doorkeeper) → portero/a m/f; (= caretaker) → conserje mf

janitor

[ˈdʒænɪtər] n (= caretaker) → concierge m
He's a janitor → Il est concierge.

janitor

nHausmeister(in) m(f); (of block of flats also)Hauswart(in) m(f)

janitor

[ˈdʒænɪtəʳ] (esp Am, Scot) n (caretaker) → custode m (Scol) → bidello

janitor

(ˈdʒӕnitə) feminine ˈjanitress noun
a caretaker or a doorkeeper.

janitor

حَاجِبٌ domovník pedel Hausmeister επιστάτης conserje talonmies concierge pazikuća custode 用務員 수위 conciërge vaktmester woźny porteiro, zelador вахтер vaktmästare ภารโรง bina sorumlusu người trông coi 看门人
References in classic literature ?
Up went her head, and the look that she gave me took all the majesty out of me, and left me feeling more like the palace janitor--if palaces have janitors.
At the British Museum the pigeons were crooning among the shadows of the grimy colonnade, and the stalwart janitors looked less stalwart than usual, as though their medals were too heavy for them.
The waiting-rooms of that Department soon began to be familiar with his presence, and he was generally ushered into them by its janitors much as a pickpocket might be shown into a police-office; the principal difference being that the object of the latter class of public business is to keep the pickpocket, while the Circumlocution object was to get rid of Clennam.
At Notre-Dame it was a tiny cell situated on the roof of the side aisle, beneath the flying buttresses, precisely at the spot where the wife of the present janitor of the towers has made for herself a garden, which is to the hanging gardens of Babylon what a lettuce is to a palm-tree, what a porter's wife is to a Semiramis.
Mackie, the head teacher, offered me a position as janitor.
I was determined from the first to make my work as janitor so valuable that my services would be indispensable.
At the first meeting of the Board he was mistaken for one of the exhibits, and the janitor was ordered to remove him to his appropriate glass case.
Had King Solomon been the janitor, with all his treasures piled up in the basement, Jim would have pulled out his watch every time he passed, just to see him pluck at his beard from envy.
At the expiration of that time, wheels were heard whirling up to the gate--the young janitor went out with his gate-keys.
Among the many billets which I have filled in America during my wandering life, I was once janitor and sweeper out of the laboratory at York College.
Striking janitors will continue to raise questions about McCain and his corporate supporters' position on good jobs for Latino workers at upcoming events where McCain is scheduled to court the Latino vote, including the annual Council of La Raza's convention in San Diego in July.
And now he's trying to blame the Record for his gaffe about janitors.