japanner


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japanner

(dʒəˈpænə)
n
a person who lacquers with japan or a similar varnisha native or inhabitant of Japan
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Living in Lower Tower Street, Birmingham in 1851 Patrick was a silk weaver whilst his son 16-year-old William was an oil-cloth japanner.
Circumstances later found him in Wolverhampton, where he became an apprentice japanner, painting the decoration on enamelled tea trays.
Within this group, additionally, some portion of working children may have been unaccounted for by the school census takers (again, difficult to estimate), since they labored for and were paid by their fathers rather than by an employer, as one japanner reported:
Initially Chaloner appears to have made a living by selling sex aids (I kid you not) and fake watches, and then as a quack doctor and japanner.
Swinney's Directory of Birmingham of 1800 identifies a large number of residents with Irish names in professions as diverse as a japanner and Daimler, dancing master and theatrical manager.
Like the japanners down in the Black Country, late 18th century pottery manufacturers were becoming interested in how art work could be applied to their products, without simply employing an artist to paint it on.
Other old trades that have bitten the dust include wax merchants, corn chandlers, watch and clock makers, Japanners who sold lacquer for furniture and snuffers who stocked metal cones for putting out candles.
Other shops included Japanners, which sold lacquer for furniture, snuffers, which sold conical metal items to put out candles, and wax merchants, both of which went out of business following the widespread introduction of electricity in the 20th century.