japonaiserie


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japonaiserie

(ˌdʒæpəˈnɛzəˌriː)
n
a style of art or decoration that is influenced by, or reflects, Japanese styles
References in periodicals archive ?
Such influence, which predates the Leach-Hamada popularisation of mingei, gave rise to the elegantly refined japonaiserie of the late-19th century.
Other--in my opinion less sophisticated--texts include Jay McInerney's Ransom full of machismo and japonaiserie (Vincent Van Gogh's nineteenth-century notion about the influence of Japanese art and culture), Clive James's comedy Brrm Brrm, or Alan Booth's and Richard Gordon Smith's travel writings (on travel and Japan, see, e.
Paintings of velvet-swaddled damsels, with fiery hair and mournful pouts, fraternized with blue-and-white china, japonaiserie costumes, and gilt-edged tomes of illustrated fairy tales in "The Cult of Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement 1860-1900.
Cutting back on the customary Japonaiserie trivia, the peach blossoms in particular, he has instilled a certain vitality, a tonic brilliance.
The other day I was thinking of Ashton's magical wisp of a ballet Madame Chrysantheme, an exquisite piece of theatrical Japonaiserie, as delicate as a consummately crafted ivory fan, but now broken, totally lost in time.
Paradoxically, it was owing precisely to the accident of residence outside Europe that Pessanha, the first twentieth-century Portuguese poet to be influenced by East Asian poetry, was unaffected by the vogue of japonaiserie radiating from Paris in the early years of his career.
Just as an artist portraying, a seventeenth-century Dutch merchant might have wanted it known that he wore expensive furs, Tan lets us see her subjects' apartments, their books, a child's toys, one woman's japonaiserie, another's laptop.
Although the costumes by Bill Fenner proved quite attractive, the modest settings had that synthetic japonaiserie air of a Japanese restaurant, acceptable yet unremarkable.