jargon


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to jargon: Computer jargon

jar·gon

 (jär′gən)
n.
1. The specialized language of a trade, profession, or similar group, especially when viewed as difficult to understand by outsiders: a crime novel that uses a lot of police jargon.
2. Nonsensical or incoherent language: "Your description will be considered as mere jargon by every man of sense" (Alexander Hamilton).
3. A hybrid language or dialect; a pidgin. Not in technical use.
intr.v. jar·goned, jar·gon·ing, jar·gons
To speak in or use jargon.

[Middle English jargoun, from Old French jargon, probably of imitative origin.]

jar′gon·ist, jar′gon·eer′ n.
jar′gon·is′tic adj.

jargon

(ˈdʒɑːɡən)
n
1. (Linguistics) specialized language concerned with a particular subject, culture, or profession
2. language characterized by pretentious syntax, vocabulary, or meaning
3. gibberish
4. (Linguistics) another word for pidgin
vb
(intr) to use or speak in jargon
[C14: from Old French, perhaps of imitative origin; see gargle]

jargon

(ˈdʒɑːɡɒn) or

jargoon

n
(Geological Science) mineralogy rare a golden yellow, smoky, or colourless variety of zircon
[C18: from French, from Italian giargone, ultimately from Persian zargūn of the golden colour; see zircon]

jar•gon

(ˈdʒɑr gən, -gɒn)
n.
1. the language, esp. the vocabulary, peculiar to a particular trade, profession, or group: medical jargon.
2. unintelligible talk or writing; gibberish; babble.
3. pidgin.
4. language that is characterized by uncommon or pretentious vocabulary and convoluted syntax and is often vague in meaning.
v.i.
5. to jargonize.
[1300–50; Middle English jargoun < Middle French; Old French jargon, gargun, derivative of an expressive base *garg-; see gargle, gargoyle]
jar′gon•y, jar`gon•is′tic, adj.
syn: See language.

jargon


Past participle: jargoned
Gerund: jargoning

Imperative
jargon
jargon
Present
I jargon
you jargon
he/she/it jargons
we jargon
you jargon
they jargon
Preterite
I jargoned
you jargoned
he/she/it jargoned
we jargoned
you jargoned
they jargoned
Present Continuous
I am jargoning
you are jargoning
he/she/it is jargoning
we are jargoning
you are jargoning
they are jargoning
Present Perfect
I have jargoned
you have jargoned
he/she/it has jargoned
we have jargoned
you have jargoned
they have jargoned
Past Continuous
I was jargoning
you were jargoning
he/she/it was jargoning
we were jargoning
you were jargoning
they were jargoning
Past Perfect
I had jargoned
you had jargoned
he/she/it had jargoned
we had jargoned
you had jargoned
they had jargoned
Future
I will jargon
you will jargon
he/she/it will jargon
we will jargon
you will jargon
they will jargon
Future Perfect
I will have jargoned
you will have jargoned
he/she/it will have jargoned
we will have jargoned
you will have jargoned
they will have jargoned
Future Continuous
I will be jargoning
you will be jargoning
he/she/it will be jargoning
we will be jargoning
you will be jargoning
they will be jargoning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been jargoning
you have been jargoning
he/she/it has been jargoning
we have been jargoning
you have been jargoning
they have been jargoning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been jargoning
you will have been jargoning
he/she/it will have been jargoning
we will have been jargoning
you will have been jargoning
they will have been jargoning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been jargoning
you had been jargoning
he/she/it had been jargoning
we had been jargoning
you had been jargoning
they had been jargoning
Conditional
I would jargon
you would jargon
he/she/it would jargon
we would jargon
you would jargon
they would jargon
Past Conditional
I would have jargoned
you would have jargoned
he/she/it would have jargoned
we would have jargoned
you would have jargoned
they would have jargoned

jargon

A language that is special to a profession, culture, or subject, often technical, and is not easily understood by outsiders; also used to mean any apparently nonsensical language .
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jargon - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
swiz - British slang for a swindle
heist, rip-off - the act of stealing
shakedown - extortion of money (as by blackmail)
power trip - (slang) a self-aggrandizing action undertaken simply for the pleasure of exercising control over other people
blowjob, cock sucking - slang for fellatio
hand job, jacking off, jerking off, wank - slang for masturbation
dekko - British slang for a look
square-bashing - drill on a barracks square
shakedown - a very thorough search of a person or a place; "a shakedown by the police uncovered the drugs"
caff - informal British term for a cafe
deck - street name for a packet of illegal drugs
gat, rod - a gangster's pistol
Mickey Finn - slang term for knockout drops
nick - (British slang) a prison; "he's in the nick"
dreck, schlock, shlock - merchandise that is shoddy or inferior
cert - an absolute certainty; "it's a dead cert"
legs - staying power; "that old Broadway play really has legs"
soup-strainer, toothbrush - slang for a mustache
arsehole, bunghole, arse, asshole - vulgar slang for anus
bay window, potbelly, tummy, corporation, pot - slang for a paunch
niff, pong - an unpleasant smell
street name - slang for something (especially for an illegal drug); "`smack' is a street name for heroin"
corker - (dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"
hooey, poppycock, stuff and nonsense, stuff - senseless talk; "don't give me that stuff"
baloney, bilgewater, boloney, bosh, drool, humbug, tommyrot, tosh, twaddle, taradiddle, tarradiddle - pretentious or silly talk or writing
codswallop, folderol, trumpery, wish-wash, applesauce, tripe, rubbish, trash - nonsensical talk or writing
skin flick - a pornographic movie
dibs - a claim of rights; "I have dibs on that last slice of pizza"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
rhyming slang - slang that replaces words with rhyming words or expressions and then typically omits the rhyming component; "Cockney rhyming slang"
bunfight, bun-fight - (Briticism) a grand formal party on an important occasion
burnup - a high-speed motorcycle race on a public road
nosh-up - a large satisfying meal
hood - (slang) a neighborhood
'hood - (slang) a neighborhood
paleface - (slang) a derogatory term for a white person (supposedly used by North American Indians)
poor white trash, white trash - (slang) an offensive term for White people who are impoverished
honkey, honkie, honky, whitey - (slang) offensive names for a White man
slant-eye, gook - (slang) a disparaging term for an Asian person (especially for North Vietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War)
Injun, red man, Redskin - (slang) offensive term for Native Americans
hymie, kike, sheeny, yid - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Jew
Chinaman, chink - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Chinese descent
dago, ginzo, greaseball, wop, Guinea - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Italian descent
Jap, Nip - (offensive slang) offensive term for a person of Japanese descent
spic, spick, spik - (ethnic slur) offensive term for persons of Latin American descent
Boche, Jerry, Kraut, Krauthead, Hun - offensive term for a person of German descent
2.jargon - a colorless (or pale yellow or smoky) variety of zircon
zircon, zirconium silicate - a common mineral occurring in small crystals; chief source of zirconium; used as a refractory when opaque and as a gem when transparent
3.jargon - specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
doctorspeak - medical jargon
ecobabble - using the technical language of ecology to make the user seem ecologically aware
Eurobabble - the jargon of European community documents and regulations
gobbledygook - incomprehensible or pompous jargon of specialists
psychobabble - using language loaded with psychological terminology
technobabble - technical jargon from computing and other high-tech subjects

jargon

noun parlance, slang, idiom, patter, tongue, usage, dialect, cant, lingo (informal), patois, argot full of the jargon and slang of self-improvement courses

jargon

noun
2. A variety of a language that differs from the standard form:
3. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
Translations
لُغَه خاصَّه
hantýrkaslangžargon
fagsprogjargon
ammattikielijargonmongerrusslangi
szaknyelvszakzsargontolvajnyelvzsargonblabla
sérmál
žargons
cargonözel dil

jargon

[ˈdʒɑːgən] Njerga f

jargon

[ˈdʒɑːrgɒn ˈdʒɑːrgən] njargon m

jargon

nJargon m (pej), → Fachsprache f

jargon

[ˈdʒɑːgən] ngergo

jargon

(ˈdʒaːgən) noun
special words or phrases used within a group, trade or profession etc. legal jargon; medical jargon; Thieves use a special jargon in order to confuse passing hearers.

jar·gon

n. jerga, jerigonza; parafasia. V.: paraphasia
References in classic literature ?
Amid the jargon of Indian dialects that he now plainly heard, it was easy to distinguish not only words, but sentences, in the patois of the Canadas.
It was hard to tell, with all this strange legal jargon, words he had never heard before; but was not this plain--"the party of the first part hereby covenants and agrees to rent to the said party of the second part
This they would sing, as a chorus, to words which to many would seem unmeaning jargon, but which, nevertheless, were full of meaning to themselves.
I detest jargon of every kind, and sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in but what was worn and hackneyed out of all sense and meaning.
Besides these Dervishes, were other three who had rushed into another sect, which mended matters with a jargon about "the Centre of Truth:" holding that Man had got out of the Centre of Truth--which did not need much demonstration--but had not got out of the Circumference, and that he was to be kept from flying out of the Circumference, and was even to be shoved back into the Centre, by fasting and seeing of spirits.
I got through some jargon to the effect that I took the liberty of doubting that.
I can wind my horn, though I call not the blast either a recheate or a morte I can cheer my dogs on the prey, and I can flay and quarter the animal when it is brought down, without using the newfangled jargon of curee, arbor, nombles, and all the babble of the fabulous Sir Tristrem.
It is likewise to be observed, that this society has a peculiar cant and jargon of their own, that no other mortal can understand, and wherein all their laws are written, which they take special care to multiply; whereby they have wholly confounded the very essence of truth and falsehood, of right and wrong; so that it will take thirty years to decide, whether the field left me by my ancestors for six generations belongs to me, or to a stranger three hundred miles off.
The goatherds did not understand this jargon about squires and knights-errant, and all they did was to eat in silence and stare at their guests, who with great elegance and appetite were stowing away pieces as big as one's fist.
To employ the jargon of the day, is there not a singular drama in the situation of these four personages?
A diction that is made up of strange (or rare) terms is a jargon.
But Clara had not patience to hear any more of the unintelligible jargon which has got possession of the world to-day, much as Mr.