jasperware


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

jasper ware

or jas·per·ware (jăs′pər-wâr′)
n.
A fine white stoneware originally produced by Josiah Wedgwood, often colored by metallic oxides with raised designs remaining white.

jasperware

Colored stoneware with raised designs in white, invented by Josiah Wedgwood.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Be careful; the stairs and landings are dark; don't stumble.
The young man paused, looked as if he was going to say more, when suddenly the boat stopped, and the company made the usual steamboat rush, to see where they were landing.
She was a-visiting there at Booth's Landing, and just in the edge of the evening she started over with her nigger woman in the horse-ferry to stay all night at her friend's house, Miss What-you-may-call-herQI disremember her name -- and they lost their steering- oar, and swung around and went a-floating down, stern first, about two mile, and saddle-baggsed on the wreck, and the ferryman and the nigger woman and the horses was all lost, but Miss Hooker she made a grab and got aboard the wreck.
The scene of this chronicle is the town of Dawson's Landing, on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, half a day's journey, per steamboat, below St.
At the end of a long twelve or fifteen minutes the wheels stopped, and Tom slipped overboard and swam ashore in the dusk, landing fifty yards down- stream, out of danger of possible stragglers.
On the broad landing between Miss Havisham's own room and that other room in which the long table was laid out, I saw a garden-chair - a light chair on wheels, that you pushed from behind.
In the dusk of an October evening, a sensible looking woman of forty came out through an oaken door to a broad landing on the first floor of an old English country-house.
The seamen at their landing observed my canoe, and rummaging it all over, easily conjectured that the owner could not be far off.
As it was, El Uchali took refuge at Modon, which is an island near Navarino, and landing forces fortified the mouth of the harbour and waited quietly until Don John retired.
Clinging to the wall with my feet and one hand, I unloosened one of the long leather straps of my trappings at the end of which dangled a great hook by which air sailors are hung to the sides and bottoms of their craft for various purposes of repair, and by means of which landing parties are lowered to the ground from the battleships.
There were four Musketeers on the bottom steps, amusing themselves with the following exercise, while ten or twelve of their comrades waited upon the landing place to take their turn in the sport.
He came there, and the plan was unfolded to him for leaving Elba, the projected landing, etc.