jasperware


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jasper ware

or jas·per·ware (jăs′pər-wâr′)
n.
A fine white stoneware originally produced by Josiah Wedgwood, often colored by metallic oxides with raised designs remaining white.

jasperware

Colored stoneware with raised designs in white, invented by Josiah Wedgwood.
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Liverpool Cathedral, St James' Mount, Liverpool, 0151 709 6271, PS5 -Thu, 28 Sep Wedgwood Wares Join Alyson Pollard, Senior Curator of Art Galleries, for a closer look at the best collection of Wedgwood jasperware in the world.
These pieces are known as Wedgwood Jasperware, and yours is probably a more unusual pattern called Katumi Crane.
Wedgwood's jasperware was similarly the subject of extensive, if not always successful, emulation.
The firm has been making Jasperware, perhaps better known as Wedgwood Blue (although it comes in other colours), ever since.
THIS highly decorative Wedgwood Jasperware calyx-krater shaped vase and cover decorated typically in relief with classical subjects, circa 1900, is one of a number of pieces on sale at Chester Antiques Show.
Dr Matthew Martin, NGV Assistant Curator of Decorative Arts, is of the view that the dual factors of international prestige and a unique national connection strongly influenced many initial purchases by the fledgling gallery, which included significant examples of Black Basalt (1768) and Jasperware (1774).
To reinforce the validity of this assertion and to emphasise the legitimate lineage of American ceramics in British production, the Union Porcelain Works' display at the Centennial Exhibition featured copies of the Century Vase atop pedestals designed in imitation of Wedgwood jasperware.
Josiah Wedgwood purchased moulds from Tassie and developed a method to create cameos from his new ceramic body, Jasperware.
Featuring a range of historic and contemporary teaware, including a 19th-century Russian samovar and a 1950s Wedgwood Jasperware teapot, the display explores the ways in which designers and craftspeople have transformed the taking of tea into an art form.
Its exact origin is unknown, but it first became famous through its association with famed British jasperware craftsman Josiah Wedgwood who believed that art and industry had enormous potential to better the human condition.
Lord Wedgwood Hill launch 20 Distinguished House of Wedgwood pieces, mostly limited-edition prestige Jasperware items.
Delicate Jasperware heart-shaped boxes are perfect for a wedding present and cost pounds 25 each.