jaws


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jaw

 (jô)
n.
1.
a. Either of two bony or cartilaginous structures that in most vertebrates form the framework of the mouth and hold the teeth.
b. The mandible or maxilla or the part of the face covering these bones.
c. Any of various structures of invertebrates that have an analogous function to vertebrate jaws.
2. Either of two opposed hinged parts in a mechanical device.
3. jaws The walls of a pass, canyon, or cavern.
4. jaws A dangerous situation or confrontation: the jaws of death.
5. Slang
a. Impudent argument or back talk: Don't give me any jaw.
b. A conversation or chat.
intr.v. jawed, jaw·ing, jaws Slang
1. To talk vociferously; jabber.
2. To talk; converse.

[Middle English jawe, jowe, perhaps from Old French joue, cheek.]

jaw′less adj.

jaws

(dʒɔːz)
pl n
1. (Physical Geography) the narrow opening of some confined place such as a gorge
2. the jaws a dangerously close position: the jaws of death.
References in classic literature ?
There was a dentist's sign, among others, which adorned the entrance, and after staring a moment at the pair of artificial jaws which slowly opened and shut to draw attention to a fine set of teeth, the young gentleman put on his coat, took his hat, and went down to post himself in the opposite doorway, saying with a smile and a shiver, "It's like her to come alone, but if she has a bad time she'll need someone to help her home.
At night she dreamed that he had bitten into her body and that his jaws were dripping.
Heyward perceived, in truth, that the younger Indian had thrown his form on the side of the hillock while they were talking, like one who sought to make the most of the time allotted to rest, and that his example had been followed by David, whose voice literally "clove to his jaws," with the fever of his wound, heightened, as it was, by their toilsome march.
within are shabby shelves, ranged round with old decanters, bottles, flasks; and in those jaws of swift destruction, like another cursed Jonah (by which name indeed they called him), bustles a little withered old man, who, for their money, dearly sells the sailors deliriums and death.
This whale is not dead; he is only dispirited; out of sorts, perhaps; hypochondriac; and so supine, that the hinges of his jaw have relaxed, leaving him there in that ungainly sort of plight, a reproach to all his tribe, who must, no doubt, imprecate lock-jaws upon him.
He had been torn out of the jaws of destruction, he had been delivered from the thraldom of despair; the whole world had been changed for him--he was free, he was free
They lock themselves together and chew each other's jaws for a while; then they roll and tumble on the ground till one loses a horn or a leg and has to haul off for repairs.
But when he emerged from the towel, he was not yet satisfactory, for the clean territory stopped short at his chin and his jaws, like a mask; below and beyond this line there was a dark expanse of unirrigated soil that spread downward in front and backward around his neck.
Crying for joy, and singing for joy, were alike un- common to me while in the jaws of slavery.
I did, though: I vociferated curses enough to annihilate any fiend in Christendom; and I got a stone and thrust it between his jaws, and tried with all my might to cram it down his throat.
When he had finished, Ben Weatherstaff was standing quite still with his jaws set obstinately but with a disturbed look in his eyes fixed on Colin.
Brutus gluttonously watered at the mouth; and the tongue of Cassius, protruding in unutterable expectation, smoked again between his enormous jaws.