jay


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jay 1

 (jā)
n.
The letter j.

jay 2

 (jā)
n.
1. Any of various birds of several genera in the family Corvidae, usually brightly colored and often having a loud, harsh call. Also called jaybird.
2. An overly talkative person; a chatterbox.

[Middle English jai, from Old French, from Late Latin gāius, gāia, perhaps from Latin Gāius, personal name.]

Jay

(dʒeɪ)
n
(Biography) John 1745–1829, American statesman, jurist, and diplomat; first chief justice of the Supreme Court (1789–95). He negotiated the Jay's Treaty

Jay

(dʒeɪ)
n
(Biography) John 1745–1829, American statesman, jurist, and diplomat; first chief justice of the Supreme Court (1789–95). He negotiated the Jay's Treaty

jay

(dʒeɪ)

n.
1. any of various typically noisy, gregarious songbirds of the family Corvidae, mostly of the Northern Hemisphere, often having blue or gray plumage.
2. Slang.
a. a talkative person; chatterer.
b. a fop; dandy.
[1275–35; Middle English jai < Middle French < Late Latin gāius, gāia]

Jay

(dʒeɪ)

n.
John, 1745–1829, first Chief Justice of the U.S. 1789–95.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jay - United States diplomat and jurist who negotiated peace treaties with Britain and served as the first chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1745-1829)Jay - United States diplomat and jurist who negotiated peace treaties with Britain and served as the first chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1745-1829)
2.jay - crested largely blue bird
corvine bird - birds of the crow family
Garrulinae, subfamily Garrulinae - subfamily of the crow family: jays
Old World jay - a European jay
New World jay - a North American jay
camp robber, Canada jay, gray jay, grey jay, Perisoreus canadensis, whisker jack - a jay of northern North America with black-capped head and no crest; noted for boldness in thievery
Translations
сойка
sojka
närhi
mésangeai
šojka
szajkó
skrækskaði
kėkštas
šoja
alakarga
сойка

jay

[dʒeɪ] Narrendajo m

jay

[ˈdʒeɪ] n (= bird) → geai m

jay

nEichelhäher m

jay

:
jaywalk
jaywalking
nUnachtsamkeit f(eines Fußgängers) im Straßenverkehr

jay

[dʒeɪ] nghiandaia
References in classic literature ?
Still that breathing silence, which marks the drowsy sultriness of an American landscape in July, pervaded the secluded spot, interrupted only by the low voices of the men, the occasional and lazy tap of a woodpecker, the discordant cry of some gaudy jay, or a swelling on the ear, from the dull roar of a distant waterfall.
There was the honest cockrobin, the favorite game of stripling sportsmen, with its loud querulous note; and the twittering blackbirds flying in sable clouds, and the golden- winged woodpecker with his crimson crest, his broad black gorget, and splendid plumage; and the cedar-bird, with its red tipt wings and yellow-tipt tail and its little monteiro cap of feathers; and the blue jay, that noisy coxcomb, in his gay light blue coat and white underclothes, screaming and chattering, nodding and bobbing and bowing, and pretending to be on good terms with every songster of the grove.
Now I've never heard a jay use bad grammar but very seldom; and when they do, they are as ashamed as a human; they shut right down and leave.
A catbird, the Northern mocker, lit in a tree over Tom's head, and trilled out her imitations of her neighbors in a rapture of enjoyment; then a shrill jay swept down, a flash of blue flame, and stopped on a twig almost within the boy's reach, cocked his head to one side and eyed the strangers with a consuming curiosity; a gray squirrel and a big fellow of the "fox" kind came skurrying along, sitting up at intervals to inspect and chatter at the boys, for the wild things had probably never seen a human being before and scarcely knew whether to be afraid or not.
And then you won't know me, sir; and I shall not be your Jane Eyre any longer, but an ape in a harlequin's jacket--a jay in borrowed plumes.
Betty Jay scented the boiling of Squire Cass's hams, but her longing was arrested by the unctuous liquor in which they were boiled; and when the seasons brought round the great merry-makings, they were regarded on all hands as a fine thing for the poor.
He was further annoyed by the jay bird which followed him persistently.
What with the Jay Cooke failure, the Hayes-Tilden deadlock, and the bursting of a hundred railroad bubbles, there was very little in the news of the day to encourage investors.
That of John Jay was associated with them shortly after the peace, in the capacity of Secretary to the Congress for Foreign Affairs.
Uncle Salters he sold it this spring to a jay from Boston as wanted to build a summerhaouse, an' he got a heap for it.
That's God's truth, gentlemen, every word of it, and I heard no more about it until that lad came riding up with a note which made me walk in here, like a jay, and give myself into your hands.
She had a laugh like the cry of a jay, at once startling and joyless.