jealous


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jeal·ous

 (jĕl′əs)
adj.
1. Fearful or wary of losing one's position or situation to someone else, especially in a sexual relationship: Her new boyfriend was jealous of her male friends.
2. Envious or resentful of the good fortune or achievements of another: I felt jealous when my coworker got a promotion. See Usage Note below.
3. Having to do with or arising from feelings of apprehension, bitterness, or envy: jealous thoughts.
4. Vigilant in guarding something: We are jealous of our good name.
5. Intolerant of disloyalty or infidelity; autocratic: a jealous god.

[Middle English jelous, from Old French gelos, gelous, from Vulgar Latin *zēlōsus, zealous, solicitous, from Late Latin zēlus, zeal; see zeal.]

jeal′ous·ly adv.
jeal′ous·ness n.
Usage Note: Traditional usage holds that we are jealous when we fear losing something that is important to us and envious when we desire that which someone else has. In this view, one might experience jealousy upon seeing one's spouse flirt with another (because of the fear of losing the spouse), while one might experience envy upon seeing a friend with an attractive date (because of one's desire to have an attractive date of one's own). In common usage, this distinction is not always observed, and jealousy and jealous are often used in situations that involve envy. Our 2015 survey shows that the distinction is alive and well: large majorities of the Usage Panel approved the traditional uses of jealousy (She was jealous when she saw her husband having dinner with another woman) and envy (He was envious of the expensive sports car his neighbor bought), while only a minority accepted the switched uses: 29 percent accepted envious for the suspicious dinner, and 34 percent accepted jealous for the expensive sports car. The last figure does mean, though, that a third of the Panelists accept jealous meaning "envious," and an even larger minority (43 percent) accept it when the entity being coveted is a person rather than an object, as in Never having been popular myself, I'm jealous of your many friends. It is evident from these results that many careful writers prefer to see the distinction between the two words maintained, with jealous being reserved for situations where one fears losing something and envious used for situations where one wants what one does not have.

jealous

(ˈdʒɛləs)
adj
1. suspicious or fearful of being displaced by a rival: a jealous lover.
2. (often: postpositive and foll by of) resentful (of) or vindictive (towards), esp through envy: a child jealous of his brother.
3. (often: postpositive and foll by of) possessive and watchful in the maintenance or protection (of): jealous of one's reputation.
4. characterized by or resulting from jealousy
5. (Bible) obsolete or biblical demanding exclusive loyalty: a jealous God.
6. an obsolete word for zealous
[C13: from Old French gelos, from Medieval Latin zēlōsus, from Late Latin zēlus emulation, jealousy, from Greek zēlos zeal]
ˈjealously adv
ˈjealousness n

jeal•ous

(ˈdʒɛl əs)

adj.
1. resentful and envious, as of someone's success, advantages, etc.: to be jealous of a rich brother.
2. proceeding from suspicious fears or envious resentment: a jealous rage.
3. inclined to suspicions of rivalry, unfaithfulness, etc., as in love: a jealous husband.
4. watchful in guarding something: to be jealous of one's independence.
5. intolerant of unfaithfulness or rivalry: The Lord is a jealous God.
[1175–1225; Middle English jelous, gelos < Old French gelos < Vulgar Latin *zēlōsus= Late Latin zēl(us) zeal + ōsus -ose1]
jeal′ous•ly, adv.
jeal′ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.jealous - showing extreme cupidity; painfully desirous of another's advantages; "he was never covetous before he met her"; "jealous of his success and covetous of his possessions"; "envious of their art collection"
desirous, wishful - having or expressing desire for something; "desirous of high office"; "desirous of finding a quick solution to the problem"
2.jealous - suspicious or unduly suspicious or fearful of being displaced by a rival; "a jealous lover"
distrustful - having or showing distrust; "a man of distrustful nature"; "my experience...in other fields of law has made me distrustful of rules of thumb generally"- B.N.Cardozo; "vigilant and distrustful superintendence"- Thomas Jefferson

jealous

adjective
2. envious, grudging, resentful, begrudging, green, intolerant, green-eyed, invidious, green with envy, desirous, covetous, emulous I have never sought to make my readers jealous of my megastar lifestyle.
envious satisfied

jealous

adjective
1. Fearful of the loss of position or affection:
2. Resentfully or painfully desirous of another's advantages:
Translations
žárlivýzávistivý
jalouxskinsyg
mustasukkainen
ljubomoran
féltékeny
afbrÿîisamuröfundsjúkur
嫉妬深い
질투하는
greizsirdīgsnenovīdīgsskaudīgs
žiarlivý
ljubosumenzavisten
svartsjuk
อิจฉา
kıskanççekemeyen
ghen tị

jealous

[ˈdʒeləs] ADJ
1. [husband, wife, lover] → celoso
to be jealous of sbtener celos de algn
to make sb jealousdar celos a algn
2. (= envious) (of possessions, qualities) → envidioso
to be jealous of sthenvidiar algo

jealous

[ˈdʒɛləs] adj [person] → jaloux/ouse
to be jealous of sb/sth → être jaloux/ouse de qn/qch

jealous

adj
husband, lover, child etceifersüchtig; (= envious: of sb’s possessions, success etc) → neidisch, missgünstig; to be jealous of somebodyauf jdn eifersüchtig sein; (= envious)jdn beneiden; I’m not at all jealous of his successich bin nicht neidisch auf seinen Erfolg, ich beneide ihn nicht um seinen Erfolg; in a (fit of) jealous ragein einem Anfall von rasender Eifersucht
(= watchful, careful)sehr besorgt (of um), bedacht (→ of auf +acc); jealous guardianstrenger Wächter or Hüter; to keep a jealous watch over or a jealous eye on somebodyjdn mit Argusaugen bewachen
(Bibl) a jealous Godein eifersüchtiger Gott

jealous

[ˈdʒɛləs] adj jealous (of)geloso/a (di)
to make sb jealous → far ingelosire qn

jealous

(ˈdʒeləs) adjective
1. (with of) feeling or showing envy. She is jealous of her sister.
2. having feelings of dislike for any possible rivals (especially in love). a jealous husband.
ˈjealously adverb
ˈjealousy noun

jealous

غَيُورٌ žárlivý jaloux eifersüchtig ζηλιάρης celoso mustasukkainen jaloux ljubomoran geloso 嫉妬深い 질투하는 jaloers sjalu zazdrosny ciumento ревнивый svartsjuk อิจฉา kıskanç ghen tị 妒忌的

jealous

a. celosa-a.

jealous

adj celoso; to be — ser celoso; My husband is very jealous..Mi esposo es muy celoso; to be — (of someone) estar celoso (de alguien), tener celos (de alguien); She is jealous of her sister..Está celosa de su hermana.. Tiene celos de su hermana.
References in classic literature ?
You see, I've always been jealous, but I trained myself never to show it; I was jealous of every man she knew; I was jealous of you.
But I leave it to any one--the swell of my fifteen-years-old manhood at learning that French Frank, the adventurer of fifty, the sailor of all the seas of all the world, was jealous of me-- and jealous over a girl most romantically named the Queen of the Oyster Pirates.
He grew extremely jealous of the physician, and determined to bring about his ruin.
Mainwaring insupportably jealous; so jealous, in short, and so enraged against me, that, in the fury of her temper, I should not be surprized at her appealing to her guardian, if she had the liberty of addressing him: but there your husband stands my friend; and the kindest, most amiable action of his life was his throwing her off for ever on her marriage.
I am so sorry, Miss Wylie," he said, as he opened the piano for her, "that you should be incommoded because my wife is silly enough to be jealous.
He's jealous of anybody mother makes a fuss over, even the priest.
We were to be fitted for practice in the courts, not only by our reading, but by a season of pettifogging before justices of the peace, which I looked forward to with no small shrinking of my shy spirit; but what really troubled me most, and was always the grain of sand between my teeth, was Blackstone's confession of his own original preference for literature, and his perception that the law was "a jealous mistress," who would suffer no rival in his affections.
These invectives he was especially desirous of throwing forth before Sophia; for as he loved her more than he did any other, so he was really jealous that she had loved her mother better than him.
The king, somewhat jealous of that maternal solicitude which was bestowed particularly upon his brother, felt disposed to show towards Anne of Austria more submission and attachment than his character really dictated.
But all these sayings and doings and thinkings being unknown to Mr Swiveller, affected him not in the least; he was debating in his mind how he could best turn jealous, and wishing that Sophy were for that occasion only far less pretty than she was, or that she were her own sister, which would have served his turn as well, when the company came, and among them the market-gardener, whose name was Cheggs.
A CROW was jealous of the Raven, because he was considered a bird of good omen and always attracted the attention of men, who noted by his flight the good or evil course of future events.
Alas, that the rosy dawn came too early to me: she glowed me awake, the jealous one