jealousy

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jeal·ous·y

 (jĕl′ə-sē)
n. pl. jeal·ous·ies
1. A jealous attitude or disposition. See Usage Note at jealous.
2. Close vigilance.

jealousy

(ˈdʒɛləsɪ)
n, pl -ousies
the state or quality of being jealous. Also called (obsolete): jealoushood

jeal•ous•y

(ˈdʒɛl ə si)

n., pl. -ous•ies.
1. the quality or state of being jealous.
2. an instance of being jealous; a jealous feeling, disposition, state, or mood: petty jealousies.
syn: See envy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jealousy - a feeling of jealous envy (especially of a rival)jealousy - a feeling of jealous envy (especially of a rival)
enviousness, envy - a feeling of grudging admiration and desire to have something that is possessed by another
2.jealousy - zealous vigilance; "cherish their official political freedom with fierce jealousy"-Paul Blanshard
alertness, vigilance, watchfulness, wakefulness - the process of paying close and continuous attention; "wakefulness, watchfulness, and bellicosity make a good hunter"; "vigilance is especially susceptible to fatigue"

jealousy

noun
1. suspicion, distrust, mistrust, possessiveness, doubt, spite, resentment, wariness, ill-will, dubiety At first his jealousy only showed in small ways - he didn't mind me talking to other guys.
Related words
fear zelophobia
Quotations
"O! Beware, my lord, of jealousy;"
"It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock"
"The meat it feeds on" [William Shakespeare Othello]
"Love is strong as death; jealousy is cruel as the grave" Bible: Song of Solomon
"It is not love that is blind, but jealousy" [Lawrence Durrell Justine]
"Jealousy is no more than feeling alone against smiling enemies" [Elizabeth Bowen The House in Paris]
"Jealousy is always born with love, but does not always die with it" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Jealousy is the greatest of all evils, and the one which arouses the least pity in the person who causes it" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Love that is fed by jealousy dies hard" [Ovid Remedia Amoris]
"To jealousy, nothing is more frightful than laughter" [Françoise Sagan La Chamade]
"Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love" [George Eliot The Mill on the Floss]
"the injured lover's hell" [John Milton Paradise Lost]

jealousy

noun
Resentful or painful desire for another's advantages:
Translations
غَيْرَه
žárlivostzávist
jalousi
ĵaluzo
mustasukkaisuus
féltékenység
afbrÿîisemi; öfund
žiarlivosť
ljubosumjezavist
kıskançlık

jealousy

[ˈdʒeləsɪ] N
1. [of husband, wife, lover] → celos mpl
2. (= envy) [of possessions, qualities] → envidia f

jealousy

[ˈdʒɛləsi] njalousie f

jealousy

nEifersucht f (→ of auf +acc); (= envy: of sb’s possessions, success etc) → Neid m, → Missgunst f; their small-minded, petty jealousiesihre engstirnigen, kleinlichen Eifersüchteleien pl

jealousy

[ˈdʒɛləsɪ] ngelosia

jealous

(ˈdʒeləs) adjective
1. (with of) feeling or showing envy. She is jealous of her sister.
2. having feelings of dislike for any possible rivals (especially in love). a jealous husband.
ˈjealously adverb
ˈjealousy noun

jeal·ou·sy

n. celos.
References in classic literature ?
So from top to bottom the place was simply a seething caldron of jealousies and hatreds; there was no loyalty or decency anywhere about it, there was no place in it where a man counted for anything against a dollar.
All these jealousies and discontents, however, were so totally unsuspected by Mrs.
I did not forget to strengthen my case by informing her of the jealousies she would encounter, and the obstacles she would meet, if she went on the stage.
Candor will oblige us to admit that even such men may be actuated by upright intentions; and it cannot be doubted that much of the opposition which has made its appearance, or may hereafter make its appearance, will spring from sources, blameless at least, if not respectable -- the honest errors of minds led astray by preconceived jealousies and fears.
From these and such like considerations, which might, if consistent with prudence, be more amplified and detailed, it is easy to see that jealousies and uneasinesses may gradually slide into the minds and cabinets of other nations, and that we are not to expect that they should regard our advancement in union, in power and consequence by land and by sea, with an eye of indifference and composure.
As every State may be divided into different districts, and its citizens into different classes, which give birth to contending interests and local jealousies, so the different parts of the United States are distinguished from each other by a variety of circumstances, which produce a like effect on a larger scale.