jealously


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Related to jealously: jealousy

jeal·ous

 (jĕl′əs)
adj.
1. Fearful or wary of losing one's position or situation to someone else, especially in a sexual relationship: Her new boyfriend was jealous of her male friends.
2. Envious or resentful of the good fortune or achievements of another: I felt jealous when my coworker got a promotion. See Usage Note below.
3. Having to do with or arising from feelings of apprehension, bitterness, or envy: jealous thoughts.
4. Vigilant in guarding something: We are jealous of our good name.
5. Intolerant of disloyalty or infidelity; autocratic: a jealous god.

[Middle English jelous, from Old French gelos, gelous, from Vulgar Latin *zēlōsus, zealous, solicitous, from Late Latin zēlus, zeal; see zeal.]

jeal′ous·ly adv.
jeal′ous·ness n.
Usage Note: Traditional usage holds that we are jealous when we fear losing something that is important to us and envious when we desire that which someone else has. In this view, one might experience jealousy upon seeing one's spouse flirt with another (because of the fear of losing the spouse), while one might experience envy upon seeing a friend with an attractive date (because of one's desire to have an attractive date of one's own). In common usage, this distinction is not always observed, and jealousy and jealous are often used in situations that involve envy. Our 2015 survey shows that the distinction is alive and well: large majorities of the Usage Panel approved the traditional uses of jealousy (She was jealous when she saw her husband having dinner with another woman) and envy (He was envious of the expensive sports car his neighbor bought), while only a minority accepted the switched uses: 29 percent accepted envious for the suspicious dinner, and 34 percent accepted jealous for the expensive sports car. The last figure does mean, though, that a third of the Panelists accept jealous meaning "envious," and an even larger minority (43 percent) accept it when the entity being coveted is a person rather than an object, as in Never having been popular myself, I'm jealous of your many friends. It is evident from these results that many careful writers prefer to see the distinction between the two words maintained, with jealous being reserved for situations where one fears losing something and envious used for situations where one wants what one does not have.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.jealously - with jealousy; "he guarded his privacy jealously"
2.jealously - with jealousy; in an envious manner; "he looked at his friend's new car jealously"
Translations
بِغَيْرَه ، بِحَسَد
žárlivězávistivě
jaloux
féltékenyen
meî afbrÿîisemi
žiarlivo
zavistno
kıskançlıkla

jealously

[ˈdʒeləslɪ] ADV
1. (= enviously) → con envidia
he was jealously watching the skatersobservaba a los patinadores con envidia
2. (= protectively) → celosamente
she jealously guards her family's privacyguarda celosamente la intimidad de su familia
she's jealously possessive of himes celosa y posesiva con él

jealously

[ˈdʒɛləsli] adv [watch] → jalousement
to guard sth jealously → garder qch jalousement
a jealously guarded secret → un secret jalousement gardé

jealously

adv
eifersüchtig; (= enviously)neidisch; she’s jealously possessive of himsie stellt eifersüchtige Besitzansprüche an ihn
(= watchfully, carefully) guardeifersüchtig

jealously

[ˈdʒɛləslɪ] adv (enviously) → con gelosia; (possessively) → gelosamente

jealous

(ˈdʒeləs) adjective
1. (with of) feeling or showing envy. She is jealous of her sister.
2. having feelings of dislike for any possible rivals (especially in love). a jealous husband.
ˈjealously adverb
ˈjealousy noun
References in classic literature ?
A certain man is absent from home for many years; he is jealously watched by Poseidon, and left desolate.
Often he would be surrounded by an eager circle, all waiting to be served; holding boat-spades, pike-heads, harpoons, and lances, and jealously watching his every sooty movement, as he toiled.
His every movement is jealously watched by the police till he comes of age and presents himself for inspection; then he is either destroyed, if he is found to exceed the fixed margin of deviation, or else immured in a Government Office as a clerk of the seventh class; prevented from marriage; forced to drudge at an uninteresting occupation for a miserable stipend; obliged to live and board at the office, and to take even his vacation under close supervision; what wonder that human nature, even in the best and purest, is embittered and perverted by such surroundings
I would go out into the streets to fight with my delusion, and prowling women would mew after me; furtive, craving men glance jealously at me; weary, pale workers go coughing by me with tired eyes and eager paces, like wounded deer dripping blood; old people, bent and dull, pass murmuring to themselves; and, all unheeding, a ragged tail of gibing children.
He loved her jealously, with an inextinguishable ardour and an insatiable desire - he loved her with a masterful devotion and an infinite trustfulness.
Richardson, Barth, and Overweg, jealously anxious to push their investigations farther, arrived at Tunis and Tripoli, like their predecessors, and got as far as Mourzouk, the capital of Fezzan.
Jealously surrounded by its own high walls, the cottage suggested, even to the most unimaginative persons, the idea of an asylum or a prison.
This had been Maud's idea, and she had herself jealously gathered all the moss.
I kept that most jealously out of sight; and I did the same with my naval academy which I had established at a remote seaport.
He watched jealously Rose's companionship with others; and though he knew it was unreasonable could not help sometimes saying bitter things to him.
Marilla was thinking of her whole past life, her cramped but not unhappy childhood, the jealously hidden dreams and the blighted hopes of her girlhood, the long, gray, narrow, monotonous years of dull middle life that followed.
Doctor," as she called Anne, with blind fervor, looked rather jealously askance at Marilla at first.