jealousy


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jeal·ous·y

 (jĕl′ə-sē)
n. pl. jeal·ous·ies
1. A jealous attitude or disposition.
2. Close vigilance.

jealousy

(ˈdʒɛləsɪ)
n, pl -ousies
the state or quality of being jealous. Also called (obsolete): jealoushood

jeal•ous•y

(ˈdʒɛl ə si)

n., pl. -ous•ies.
1. the quality or state of being jealous.
2. an instance of being jealous; a jealous feeling, disposition, state, or mood: petty jealousies.
syn: See envy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jealousy - a feeling of jealous envy (especially of a rival)jealousy - a feeling of jealous envy (especially of a rival)
enviousness, envy - a feeling of grudging admiration and desire to have something that is possessed by another
2.jealousy - zealous vigilance; "cherish their official political freedom with fierce jealousy"-Paul Blanshard
alertness, vigilance, watchfulness, wakefulness - the process of paying close and continuous attention; "wakefulness, watchfulness, and bellicosity make a good hunter"; "vigilance is especially susceptible to fatigue"

jealousy

noun
1. suspicion, distrust, mistrust, possessiveness, doubt, spite, resentment, wariness, ill-will, dubiety At first his jealousy only showed in small ways - he didn't mind me talking to other guys.
Related words
fear zelophobia
Quotations
"O! Beware, my lord, of jealousy;"
"It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock"
"The meat it feeds on" [William Shakespeare Othello]
"Love is strong as death; jealousy is cruel as the grave" Bible: Song of Solomon
"It is not love that is blind, but jealousy" [Lawrence Durrell Justine]
"Jealousy is no more than feeling alone against smiling enemies" [Elizabeth Bowen The House in Paris]
"Jealousy is always born with love, but does not always die with it" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Jealousy is the greatest of all evils, and the one which arouses the least pity in the person who causes it" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Love that is fed by jealousy dies hard" [Ovid Remedia Amoris]
"To jealousy, nothing is more frightful than laughter" [Françoise Sagan La Chamade]
"Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love" [George Eliot The Mill on the Floss]
"the injured lover's hell" [John Milton Paradise Lost]

jealousy

noun
Resentful or painful desire for another's advantages:
Translations
غَيْرَه
žárlivostzávist
jalousi
ĵaluzo
mustasukkaisuus
féltékenység
afbrÿîisemi; öfund
žiarlivosť
ljubosumjezavist
kıskançlık

jealousy

[ˈdʒeləsɪ] N
1. [of husband, wife, lover] → celos mpl
2. (= envy) [of possessions, qualities] → envidia f

jealousy

[ˈdʒɛləsi] njalousie f

jealousy

nEifersucht f (→ of auf +acc); (= envy: of sb’s possessions, success etc) → Neid m, → Missgunst f; their small-minded, petty jealousiesihre engstirnigen, kleinlichen Eifersüchteleien pl

jealousy

[ˈdʒɛləsɪ] ngelosia

jealous

(ˈdʒeləs) adjective
1. (with of) feeling or showing envy. She is jealous of her sister.
2. having feelings of dislike for any possible rivals (especially in love). a jealous husband.
ˈjealously adverb
ˈjealousy noun

jeal·ou·sy

n. celos.
References in classic literature ?
If Jo had not been otherwise engaged, Laurie's behavior would have amused her, for a faint twinge, not of jealousy, but something like suspicion, caused that gentleman to stand aloof at first, and observe the newcomer with brotherly circumspection.
The little green god of jealousy has Tom in his clutches.
Yet for all their frailness, how much jealousy and envy and unhappiness some of them managed to contain
Edna experienced a pang of jealousy because he had written to his mother rather than to her.
The recent defection of the tribe had, as they well knew themselves, subjected the Delawares to much reproach among their French allies; and they were now made to feel that their future actions were to be regarded with jealousy and distrust.
Giving it to Phoebe, she watched her features narrowly, and with a certain jealousy as to the mode in which the girl would show herself affected by the picture.
But, whether influenced by the jealousy that seems instinctive with every petted child towards a dangerous rival, or from whatever caprice of her freakish nature, Pearl would show no favour to the clergyman.
the lady of his heart was his partner in the dance, and smiling graciously in reply to all his amorous oglings; while Brom Bones, sorely smitten with love and jealousy, sat brooding by himself in one corner.
For could the sun do that, then could I do the other; since there is ever a sort of fair play herein, jealousy presiding over all creations.
And then there was Marija Berczynskas, who, fired with jealousy by the success of Jurgis, had set out upon her own responsibility to get a place.
The thing had been remarked with petulant jealousy by his wife, and she regarded her husband's absorbing devotion to the child with suspicion and dislike; all that was given to her seemed so much taken from herself.
I was afraid of one thing - the jealousy of the other children of the post; but there is nothing of that, I am glad to say.