jejune


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je·june

 (jə-jo͞on′)
adj.
1. Not interesting; dull: "and there pour forth jejune words and useless empty phrases" (Anthony Trollope).
2. Lacking maturity; childish: surprised by their jejune responses to our problems.
3. Lacking in nutrition: a jejune diet.

[From Latin iēiūnus, meager, dry, fasting.]

je·june′ly adv.
je·june′ness n.

jejune

(dʒɪˈdʒuːn)
adj
1. simple; naive; unsophisticated
2. insipid; dull; dry
3. lacking nourishment; insubstantial or barren
[C17: from Latin jējūnus hungry, empty]
jeˈjunely adv
jeˈjuneness, jeˈjunity n

je•june

(dʒɪˈdʒun)

adj.
1. lacking interest or significance; insipid: a jejune novel.
2. lacking maturity; childish: jejune behavior.
3. lacking nutritive elements: a jejune diet.
[1605–15; < Latin jējūnus empty, poor, mean]
je•june′ly, adv.
je•june′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.jejune - lacking in nutritive value; "the jejune diets of the very poor"
unwholesome - detrimental to physical or moral well-being; "unwholesome food"; "unwholesome habits like smoking"
2.jejune - displaying or suggesting a lack of maturityjejune - displaying or suggesting a lack of maturity; "adolescent insecurity"; "jejune responses to our problems"; "their behavior was juvenile"; "puerile jokes"
immature - characteristic of a lack of maturity; "immature behavior"
3.jejune - lacking interest or significance or impact; "an insipid personality"; "jejune novel"
uninteresting - arousing no interest or attention or curiosity or excitement; "a very uninteresting account of her trip"

jejune

adjective
1. (Formal) simple, silly, juvenile, naive, pointless, childish, immature, senseless, unsophisticated, puerile They were of great service in correcting my jejune generalizations.
2. (Old-fashioned) dull, dry, banal, prosaic, colourless, uninteresting, inane, insipid, wishy-washy (informal), vapid We knew we were in for a pretty long, jejune evening.

jejune

adjective
Lacking the qualities requisite for spiritedness and originality:
Informal: wishy-washy.
Translations

jejune

[dʒɪˈdʒuːn] ADJ
1. (= naïve) → cándido
2. (= dull) [subject] → árido; [evening] → aburrido
3. (= insipid) → insípido, sin sustancia

jejune

adj (liter: = dull) → fade, langweilig; (= naive, simple)simpel
References in classic literature ?
It is undeniable that but for the desire to be where Dorothea was, and perhaps the want of knowing what else to do, Will would not at this time have been meditating on the needs of the English people or criticising English statesmanship: he would probably have been rambling in Italy sketching plans for several dramas, trying prose and finding it too jejune, trying verse and finding it too artificial, beginning to copy "bits" from old pictures, leaving off because they were "no good," and observing that, after all, self-culture was the principal point; while in politics he would have been sympathizing warmly with liberty and progress in general.
We pass in the world for sects and schools, for erudition and piety, and we are all the time jejune babes.
I am not sure that he would not have longed for the quarrelling again, if it had ceased for an entire week; and it is certain that an acquiescent, mild wife would have left his meditations comparatively jejune and barren of mystery.
While there are many reasons no longer to indulge in jejune enthusiasms, the simple fact is that Cuban culture continues--despite the embargo and despite the virtual poverty in which most of the island lives--to turn out impressive artwork.
Americans who have been exposed to European civilization, with its harder moral edges, want necessarily to return to that infinitely jejune "belief in progress" which is the sole surviving idea of their national religion (quoted in Sigg 122).
What may have been hilarious stories in a nighttime telling around a fire come across as jejune when conveyed by the cold light of print.
In some ways, these hopes and capacities are shown to be jejune and silly.
He argues that Kingston's "pieces of distant China lore often seem jejune and even unauthentic - especially to readers who know a little bit about the original high culture which Kingston claims as her birthright" (Metzger 291; my italics).
When we did try, the result was usually as jejune as the original.
I suggest that such attempts amplify the reasons why such jejune frameworks applied to the history of economic doctrines should be abandoned altogether.
But the governor's supporters claim that beneath Engler's jejune exterior is one of the shrewdest political minds in the United States.
Reviewing anthologies can be almost as fun as compiling them, and in some cases almost as jejune or as hazardous as well.