jemadar


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jemadar

(ˈdʒɛməˌdɑː)
n
1. (Military) a native junior officer belonging to a locally raised regiment serving as mercenaries in India, esp with the British Army (until 1947)
2. an officer in the Indian police
[C18: from Urdu jama `dār, from Persian jama `at body of men + dār having]
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So in the market-place there reigns perpetual excitement, a nameless hubbub, made up of the cries of mixed-breed porters and carriers, the beating of drums, and the twanging of horns, the neighing of mules, the braying of donkeys, the singing of women, the squalling of children, and the banging of the huge rattan, wielded by the jemadar or leader of the caravans, who beats time to this pastoral symphony.
The plaque honours the bravery of Sepoy Khudadad Khan the first South Asian and Muslim recipient of the Victoria Cross Jemadar Mir Dast and Naik Shahamad Khan, who were all awarded Britain's highest award for gallantry during the First World War.
Or what about Jemadar Ali Haidar, who won the Victoria Cross in Italy in 1944, or even Darwan Sing Negi, who won his VC in France in 1914?
According to Jemadar Chint Singh, a key witness in the story of Indians in New Guinea, the Indians were at first accommodated in a swamp about eight kilometres from Wewak Point, between the sea and a creek.