jeremiad


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jer·e·mi·ad

 (jĕr′ə-mī′əd)
n.
A literary work or speech expressing a bitter lament or a righteous prophecy of doom.

[French jérémiade, after Jérémie, Jeremiah, prophet traditionally considered the author of the biblical book of Lamentations, from Late Latin Ieremiās; see Jeremiah1.]

jeremiad

(ˌdʒɛrɪˈmaɪəd)
n
a long mournful lamentation or complaint

jer•e•mi•ad

(ˌdʒɛr əˈmaɪ əd, -æd)

n.
a prolonged lament; complaint.
[1770–80; Jeremi (ah) + -ad1, in reference to Jeremiah's Lamentations]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jeremiad - a long and mournful complaint; "a jeremiad against any form of government"
complaint - an expression of grievance or resentment

jeremiad

noun
A long, violent, or blustering speech, usually of censure or denunciation:
Translations
jeremiadivalitusvirsivuodatus
jeremiád
jeremiadeklagesang
jeremiadklagovisa

jeremiad

[ˌdʒerɪˈmaɪəd] Njeremiada f

jeremiad

n (liter)Jeremiade f (liter), → Klagelied nt
References in classic literature ?
Without taking the mate's jeremiads seriously he put them beside the words of Mr.
For some readers it will appear another jeremiad decrying the loss of innocence in modernity.
Guilty Men was a jeremiad that called to account the men - including Neville Chamberlain and Lord Halifax, then still members of Winston Churchill's cabinet - whose appeasement of Adolf Hitler had helped to bring the United Kingdom to the brink of annihilation.
A chaotic jeremiad marked by overwrought metaphor" - Critic Oliver Kamm's assessment of the new book on grammar by Sir Harold Evans, former editor of The Times, urging the publishers to withdraw it from sale.
The song crescendoes into a jeremiad against hostile rhetoric toward refugees, including people like his relatives who make other lives possible.
In our October 2016 issue, Helen Shaw wrote a sweeping but nuanced jeremiad about the state of the American play and the pluses and minuses of its increased academicization.
As a discursive form, the Jeremiad (Bercovitch, 1978) has its origins in the Old Testament prophets.
In six paired chapters, Romanticism in the Shadow of War demonstrates the emergence and transformation of three hybrid subgenres: the melodrama, the satiric jeremiad, and the Italianate romance.
One remembers (nostalgically, alas) Judith Butler's suggestion that the potentially offensive sign on the gay male restaurateur's door, "She's overworked and needs a rest" (167), was an occasion to think about how no constituency owns the feminine (not the female, the feminine); or how the offence taken by the theologian who hated jello-esque religious kitsch became for Eve Sedgwick an analysis of the queerly reparative vestiges of sentimentality (Epistemology 142-43); or, more recently, Lee Edelman's suggestion that we respond to Christians' jeremiad that queers are destroying the world not with "self-righteous bromides of liberal pluralism" (16) but with an analysis of how such jeremiads might, or even should, be true.
Among specific topics are ecocritical dimensions in contemporary Chinese literary criticism, an eco-critical analysis of early African American spiritual autobiography's appropriation of the American Jeremiad, revisiting tree worship in Tamil tinai societies, hybrid versions of the animal encounter in trans-Pacific popular culture, and Maxine Hong Kingston's The Fifth Book of Peace.
Employing an aphoristic, almost Nietzschean, style of prose, Charlton issues a jeremiad against "political correctness," which he identifies as a product of the left (whether socialists, communists, liberals, etc.
Jeremiad features five tracks that take the listener on a dark journey