jeremiad


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

jer·e·mi·ad

 (jĕr′ə-mī′əd)
n.
A literary work or speech expressing a bitter lament or a righteous prophecy of doom.

[French jérémiade, after Jérémie, Jeremiah, prophet traditionally considered the author of the biblical book of Lamentations, from Late Latin Ieremiās; see Jeremiah1.]

jeremiad

(ˌdʒɛrɪˈmaɪəd)
n
a long mournful lamentation or complaint

jer•e•mi•ad

(ˌdʒɛr əˈmaɪ əd, -æd)

n.
a prolonged lament; complaint.
[1770–80; Jeremi (ah) + -ad1, in reference to Jeremiah's Lamentations]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jeremiad - a long and mournful complaint; "a jeremiad against any form of government"
complaint - an expression of grievance or resentment

jeremiad

noun
A long, violent, or blustering speech, usually of censure or denunciation:
Translations
jeremiadivalitusvirsivuodatus
jeremiád
jeremiadeklagesang
jeremiadklagovisa

jeremiad

[ˌdʒerɪˈmaɪəd] Njeremiada f

jeremiad

n (liter)Jeremiade f (liter), → Klagelied nt
References in classic literature ?
Without taking the mate's jeremiads seriously he put them beside the words of Mr.
MWO offers this as a synonym (along with jeremiad and philippic, both of which I fear will soon have fallen out of use altogether) but to me a rant suggests something less carefully considered and argued than a diatribe.
Confrontation and intelligent argument are in its DNA, as illustrated in the documentary by the skirmish between Vidal and Norman Mailer over women's liberation, Mary McCarthy's jeremiad against American hegemony in Vietnam, Mark Danner's investigation into the use of enhanced interrogation during the Iraq war, and Michael Greenberg's analysis of the Occupy movement.
Employing an aphoristic, almost Nietzschean, style of prose, Charlton issues a jeremiad against "political correctness," which he identifies as a product of the left (whether socialists, communists, liberals, etc.
Frankly, the Canadian variant of that international battle, best captured in Jack Granatstein's jeremiad for a lost, mythical world of manly men in politics and war, ended in an easy victory for social and cultural history.
After Democracy: The Promise and Failure of Democracy is a wide-ranging, polemical, learned Jeremiad of a book from the pen of a renegade conservative man of letters--novelist, travel writer, historian, once senior literary editor of National Review, singer of classical, operatic, and sacred music, horseman, and hunter.
But the series isn't a finger-wagging jeremiad, nor is it an unrelieved bummer to watch.
Jeremiad features five tracks that take the listener on a dark journey
The late Robert Bork famously warned in his 1996 jeremiad Slouching Toward Gomorrah that America would succumb to moral decadence if Uncle Sam didn't censor pornography and promote traditional marriage.
But that jeremiad was about New England, not Israel; about proper Christian behavior, not the story of Jews told for its own sake.
His ultimate conclusion that Reagan was influenced by Chambers' use of the jeremiad, or prolonged complaint, as a rhetorical device is supported chiefly by Hogue's opinion that Chambers' apocalyptic description of the ultimate end of Communism sounds like something Reagan would say.
Unfortunately, only a handful of Goya's images were on display, but Dix's candid and appalling jeremiad against the abject horrors of war was shown to full ghoulish effect.