jerkin

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jer·kin

 (jûr′kĭn)
n.
1. A close-fitting, hip-length, collarless jacket having no sleeves but often extended shoulders, belted and worn over a doublet by men especially in the 1500s.
2. A short, close-fitting, often sleeveless coat or jacket, usually of leather.

[Origin unknown.]

jerkin

(ˈdʒɜːkɪn)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a sleeveless and collarless short jacket worn by men or women
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a man's sleeveless and collarless fitted jacket, often made of leather, worn in the 16th and 17th centuries
[C16: of unknown origin]

jer•kin

(ˈdʒɜr kɪn)

n.
a close-fitting jacket or short coat, usu. sleeveless, often of leather.
[1510–20; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jerkin - a tight sleeveless and collarless jacket (often made of leather) worn by men in former timesjerkin - a tight sleeveless and collarless jacket (often made of leather) worn by men in former times
jacket - a short coat
Translations

jerkin

[ˈdʒɜːkɪn] Nchaleco m

jerkin

[ˈdʒɜːrkɪn] n (= garment) → gilet m sans manches

jerkin

nJacke f; (Hist) → (Leder)wams nt

jerkin

[ˈdʒɜːkɪn] ngilè m inv
References in classic literature ?
These men had eighty dark ships wherein were ranged men skilled in war, Argives with linen jerkins, very goads of war.
Varlets in green jerkins brandished hunting knives and raised on high tankards of foaming beer.
fine place,' said the stranger, 'glorious pile--frowning walls--tottering arches--dark nooks--crumbling staircases--old cathedral too--earthy smell--pilgrims' feet wore away the old steps--little Saxon doors--confessionals like money-takers' boxes at theatres--queer customers those monks--popes, and lord treasurers, and all sorts of old fellows, with great red faces, and broken noses, turning up every day--buff jerkins too-- match-locks--sarcophagus--fine place--old legends too--strange stories: capital;' and the stranger continued to soliloquise until they reached the Bull Inn, in the High Street, where the coach stopped.
If this yeoman can cleave that rod, I give him the bucklers or rather, I yield to the devil that is in his jerkin, and not to any human skill; a man can but do his best, and I will not shoot where I am sure to miss.
When this shower of arrows was over, I fell a groaning with grief and pain; and then striving again to get loose, they discharged another volley larger than the first, and some of them attempted with spears to stick me in the sides; but by good luck I had on a buff jerkin, which they could not pierce.
She wore a moss-coloured velvet jerkin with cinnamon sleeves, slim, brown, cross-gartered hose, a dainty little green cap with a hawk's feather caught in a jewel, and a hooded cloak lined with dull red.
I count for a hundred," replied Don Quixote, and without more words he drew his sword and attacked the Yanguesans and excited and impelled by the example of his master, Sancho did the same; and to begin with, Don Quixote delivered a slash at one of them that laid open the leather jerkin he wore, together with a great portion of his shoulder.
His clothes were coated with dirt, one of his hosen had slipped halfway down from his knee, the sleeve of his jerkin was split, and his face was streaked with sweat and dirt.
Now, I don't set sufficient store on the cut of my jerkin to risk being hung at Tyburn or sent for change of scene to the Indies.
A more complete article of defensive armor was a buff jerkin or shirt of great thickness, made of doublings of elk skin, and reaching to the feet, holes being left for the head and arms.
His felt doublet and leather jerkin made a spot on the velvet and silk which surrounded him.
Upon his head he wore a purple velvet cap, and purple velvet was his robe, all trimmed about with rich ermine; his jerkin and hose were of sea-green silk, and his shoes of black velvet, the pointed toes fastened to his garters with golden chains.