jester


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jest·er

 (jĕs′tər)
n.
1. One given to jesting.
2. A fool or buffoon at medieval courts.

jester

(ˈdʒɛstə)
n
a professional clown employed by a king or nobleman, esp at courts during the Middle Ages

jest•er

(ˈdʒɛs tər)

n.
1. a person who is given to jesting.
2. a professional fool or clown, esp. at a medieval court.
[1325–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jester - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Agesjester - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
merry andrew, buffoon, clown, goof, goofball - a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior

jester

noun
1. fool, clown, harlequin, zany, madcap, prankster, buffoon, pantaloon, mummer a chap dressed as a court jester
2. humorist, comic, wit, comedian, wag, joker, dag (N.Z. informal), quipster, joculator or (fem.) joculatrix he is the class jester writ large

jester

noun
A person whose words or actions provoke or are intended to provoke amusement or laughter:
Informal: card.
Translations
مُهَرِّج، مَزّاح، بَهْلول
šašek
hofnarnar
hovinarrinarri
udvari bolond
hirîfífl

jester

[ˈdʒestəʳ] Nbufón m

jester

[ˈdʒɛstər] nbouffon m

jester

n
(Hist) → Narr m; the King’s jesterder Hofnarr
(= joker)Spaßvogel m, → Witzbold m (inf)

jester

[ˈdʒɛstəʳ] n (also court jester) → buffone m (di corte)

jest

(dʒest) noun
a joke; something done or said to cause amusement.
verb
to joke.
ˈjester noun
in former times, a man employed in the courts of kings, nobles etc to amuse them with jokes etc.
in jest
as a joke; not seriously. speaking in jest.
References in classic literature ?
Gurth,'' said the Jester, ``I know thou thinkest me a fool, or thou wouldst not be so rash in putting thy head into my mouth.
The executioner speedily untied the knots which confined the doctor, and was passing the cord round the neck of the tailor, when the Sultan of Kashgar, who had missed his jester, happened to make inquiry of his officers as to what had become of him.
No, Monsieur Jester," replied D'Artagnan; "but with our four horses we may bring back our three friends, if we should have the good fortune to find them living.
My lord," said Comminges, who, irritated by his wounds, wished for revenge and longed to give back blow for blow, "shall I fire off a ball to punish that jester, and to warn him not to sing so much out of tune in the future?
Tom Saft" was a great favourite on the farm, where he played the part of the old jester, and made up for his practical deficiencies by his success in repartee.
Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, son of him who played so conspicuous a part in the early chapters of this history, -- Villiers of Buckingham, a handsome cavalier, melancholy with women, a jester with men, -- and Wilmot, Lord Rochester, a jester with both sexes, were standing at this moment before the Lady Henrietta, disputing the privilege of making her smile.
Once returned from the abysms of the utter North to that little house upon the outskirts of Meudon, it was not the philosopher, the daring observer, the man of iron energy that imposed himself on his family, but a fat and even plaintive jester, a farceur incarnate and kindly, the co-equal of his children, and, it must be written, not seldom the comic despair of Madame Lavalle, who, as she writes five years after the marriage, to her venerable mother, found "in this unequalled intellect whose name I bear the abandon of a large and very untidy boy.
The Sahib is a little hot and angry after riding,' the horse- dealer returned, with the leer of a privileged jester.
Dwarfs were as common at court, in those days, as fools; and many monarchs would have found it difficult to get through their days(days are rather longer at court than elsewhere) without both a jester to laugh with, and a dwarf to laugh at.
The worthy fellow soon became the jester and merry-andrew of the boatswain's mess, where a berth had been kept for him.
The jester was commonly called a fool, but the poets and
Vain and egotistical, supple and proud, libertine and gourmand, grasping from the pressure of debt, discreet as a tomb out of which nought issues to contradict the epitaph intended for the passer's eye, bold and fearless when soliciting, good-natured and witty in all acceptations of the word, a timely jester, full of tact, knowing how to compromise others by a glance or a nudge, shrinking from no mudhole, but gracefully leaping it, intrepid Voltairean, yet punctual at mass if a fashionable company could be met in Saint Thomas Aquinas,--such a man as this secretary- general resembled, in one way or another, all the mediocrities who form the kernel of the political world.