jester


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jest·er

 (jĕs′tər)
n.
1. One given to jesting.
2. A fool or buffoon at medieval courts.

jester

(ˈdʒɛstə)
n
a professional clown employed by a king or nobleman, esp at courts during the Middle Ages

jest•er

(ˈdʒɛs tər)

n.
1. a person who is given to jesting.
2. a professional fool or clown, esp. at a medieval court.
[1325–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jester - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Agesjester - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
merry andrew, buffoon, clown, goof, goofball - a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior

jester

noun
1. fool, clown, harlequin, zany, madcap, prankster, buffoon, pantaloon, mummer a chap dressed as a court jester
2. humorist, comic, wit, comedian, wag, joker, dag (N.Z. informal), quipster, joculator or (fem.) joculatrix he is the class jester writ large

jester

noun
A person whose words or actions provoke or are intended to provoke amusement or laughter:
Informal: card.
Translations
مُهَرِّج، مَزّاح، بَهْلول
šašek
hofnarnar
hovinarrinarri
udvari bolond
hirîfífl

jester

[ˈdʒestəʳ] Nbufón m

jester

[ˈdʒɛstər] nbouffon m

jester

n
(Hist) → Narr m; the King’s jesterder Hofnarr
(= joker)Spaßvogel m, → Witzbold m (inf)

jester

[ˈdʒɛstəʳ] n (also court jester) → buffone m (di corte)

jest

(dʒest) noun
a joke; something done or said to cause amusement.
verb
to joke.
ˈjester noun
in former times, a man employed in the courts of kings, nobles etc to amuse them with jokes etc.
in jest
as a joke; not seriously. speaking in jest.
References in classic literature ?
The jester was commonly called a fool, but the poets and
Dwarfs were as common at court, in those days, as fools; and many monarchs would have found it difficult to get through their days(days are rather longer at court than elsewhere) without both a jester to laugh with, and a dwarf to laugh at.
Come here, Hop-Frog," said he, as the jester and his friend entered the room; "swallow this bumper to the health of your absent friends, [here Hop-Frog sighed,] and then let us have the benefit of your invention.
And now, while the whole assembly (the apes included) were convulsed with laughter, the jester suddenly uttered a shrill whistle; when the chain flew violently up for about thirty feet -- dragging with it the dismayed and struggling ourang-outangs, and leaving them suspended in mid-air between the sky-light and the floor.
At length the flames, suddenly increasing in virulence, forced the jester to climb higher up the chain, to be out of their reach; and, as he made this movement, the crowd again sank, for a brief instant, into silence.
Gurth,'' said the Jester, ``I know thou thinkest me a fool, or thou wouldst not be so rash in putting thy head into my mouth.
It was to this part of the cap that the bells were attached; which circumstance, as well as the shape of his head-dress, and his own half-crazed, half-cunning expression of countenance, sufficiently pointed him out as belonging to the race of domestic clowns or jesters, maintained in the houses of the wealthy, to help away the tedium of those lingering hours which they were obliged to spend within doors.
The executioner speedily untied the knots which confined the doctor, and was passing the cord round the neck of the tailor, when the Sultan of Kashgar, who had missed his jester, happened to make inquiry of his officers as to what had become of him.
As the hunchback was one of the Sultan's private jesters, the chief of police resolved to defer sentence of death until he had consulted his master.
Jones instantly interposed on behalf of the suffering party, and pinned the insulting conqueror up to the wall: for the puppet-show man was no more able to contend with Jones than the poor party-coloured jester had been to contend with this puppet-man.
Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, son of him who played so conspicuous a part in the early chapters of this history, -- Villiers of Buckingham, a handsome cavalier, melancholy with women, a jester with men, -- and Wilmot, Lord Rochester, a jester with both sexes, were standing at this moment before the Lady Henrietta, disputing the privilege of making her smile.
The lady who, afraid of being stopped by Count Rostopchin's orders, had already in June moved with her Negroes and her women jesters from Moscow to her Saratov estate, with a vague consciousness that she was not Bonaparte's servant, was really, simply, and truly carrying out the great work which saved Russia.