jester

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jest·er

 (jĕs′tər)
n.
1. One given to jesting.
2. A fool or buffoon at medieval courts.

jester

(ˈdʒɛstə)
n
a professional clown employed by a king or nobleman, esp at courts during the Middle Ages

jest•er

(ˈdʒɛs tər)

n.
1. a person who is given to jesting.
2. a professional fool or clown, esp. at a medieval court.
[1325–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jester - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Agesjester - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
merry andrew, buffoon, clown, goof, goofball - a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior

jester

noun
1. fool, clown, harlequin, zany, madcap, prankster, buffoon, pantaloon, mummer a chap dressed as a court jester
2. humorist, comic, wit, comedian, wag, joker, dag (N.Z. informal), quipster, joculator or (fem.) joculatrix he is the class jester writ large

jester

noun
A person whose words or actions provoke or are intended to provoke amusement or laughter:
Informal: card.
Translations
مُهَرِّج، مَزّاح، بَهْلول
šašek
hofnarnar
hovinarrinarri
udvari bolond
hirîfífl

jester

[ˈdʒestəʳ] Nbufón m

jester

[ˈdʒɛstər] nbouffon m

jester

n
(Hist) → Narr m; the King’s jesterder Hofnarr
(= joker)Spaßvogel m, → Witzbold m (inf)

jester

[ˈdʒɛstəʳ] n (also court jester) → buffone m (di corte)

jest

(dʒest) noun
a joke; something done or said to cause amusement.
verb
to joke.
ˈjester noun
in former times, a man employed in the courts of kings, nobles etc to amuse them with jokes etc.
in jest
as a joke; not seriously. speaking in jest.
References in classic literature ?
It was to this part of the cap that the bells were attached; which circumstance, as well as the shape of his head-dress, and his own half-crazed, half-cunning expression of countenance, sufficiently pointed him out as belonging to the race of domestic clowns or jesters, maintained in the houses of the wealthy, to help away the tedium of those lingering hours which they were obliged to spend within doors.
As the hunchback was one of the Sultan's private jesters, the chief of police resolved to defer sentence of death until he had consulted his master.
Rose had no wrinkles, but she had folds of flesh; and jesters declared that to save chafing she powdered her skin as they do an infant's.
It had been so much talked of, even through the Atlantic cable, that jesters pretended that this slender fly had stopped a telegram on its passage and was making the most of it.
They were much quoted at sheep-shearing and haymaking times, but I refrain from recording them here, lest Tom's wit should prove to be like that of many other bygone jesters eminent in their day--rather of a temporary nature, not dealing with the deeper and more lasting relations of things.
In the good old times," said Valentin, marquises and counts used to have their appointed fools and jesters, to crack jokes for them.
At the date of my narrative, professing jesters had not altogether gone out of fashion at court.
Many years before this bogus abbey, with its congregation of irreverent jesters, was founded, there stood upon this same spot a monastery of a sterner kind, whose monks were of a somewhat different type to the revellers that were to follow them, five hundred years afterwards.
The lady who, afraid of being stopped by Count Rostopchin's orders, had already in June moved with her Negroes and her women jesters from Moscow to her Saratov estate, with a vague consciousness that she was not Bonaparte's servant, was really, simply, and truly carrying out the great work which saved Russia.
My lord," said Comminges, who, irritated by his wounds, wished for revenge and longed to give back blow for blow, "shall I fire off a ball to punish that jester, and to warn him not to sing so much out of tune in the future?
Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, son of him who played so conspicuous a part in the early chapters of this history, -- Villiers of Buckingham, a handsome cavalier, melancholy with women, a jester with men, -- and Wilmot, Lord Rochester, a jester with both sexes, were standing at this moment before the Lady Henrietta, disputing the privilege of making her smile.
Once returned from the abysms of the utter North to that little house upon the outskirts of Meudon, it was not the philosopher, the daring observer, the man of iron energy that imposed himself on his family, but a fat and even plaintive jester, a farceur incarnate and kindly, the co-equal of his children, and, it must be written, not seldom the comic despair of Madame Lavalle, who, as she writes five years after the marriage, to her venerable mother, found "in this unequalled intellect whose name I bear the abandon of a large and very untidy boy.