jest

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Related to jests: take a joke

jest

 (jĕst)
n.
1. A playful or frivolous mood or manner: spoken in jest.
2. A playful remark; a witticism or joke.
3. A playful or amusing act; a prank.
4. An object of ridicule; a laughingstock: "There are people ... so cruel as to make a jest of me" (Charles Dickens).
intr.v. jest·ed, jest·ing, jests
1. To make witty or amusing remarks.
2. To act in a playful or facetious manner.

[Middle English geste, tale, from Old French, from Latin gesta, deeds, from neuter pl. past participle of gerere, to perform.]

jest′ing·ly adv.

jest

(dʒɛst)
n
1. something done or said for amusement; joke
2. a frivolous mood or attitude; playfulness; fun: to act in jest.
3. a jeer or taunt
4. an object of derision; laughing stock; butt
vb
5. to act or speak in an amusing, teasing, or frivolous way; joke
6. to make fun of (a person or thing); scoff or mock
[C13: variant of gest]
ˈjestful adj
ˈjesting adj, n
ˈjestingly adv

jest

(dʒɛst)
n.
1. a joke or witty remark; witticism; quip.
2. a taunt, often of a teasing nature.
3. sport or fun: to speak half in jest, half in earnest.
4. the object of laughter; laughingstock.
v.i.
5. to speak in a humorous or playfully teasing way.
6. to speak derisively.
[1250–1300; Middle English; variant sp. of gest]

jest

  • joke - Latin jocus, "jest, joke," gave us joke.
  • ludicrous - Early senses of ludicrous, from the adjective ludic, were "sportive," "intended as jest" and "spontaneously playful."
  • juggle, juggler - Juggle is from Latin joculus, a diminutive of jocus, and a juggler was originally a jester.
  • jocose - From Latin jocus, "joke, jest," it means "full of jokes."

jest


Past participle: jested
Gerund: jesting

Imperative
jest
jest
Present
I jest
you jest
he/she/it jests
we jest
you jest
they jest
Preterite
I jested
you jested
he/she/it jested
we jested
you jested
they jested
Present Continuous
I am jesting
you are jesting
he/she/it is jesting
we are jesting
you are jesting
they are jesting
Present Perfect
I have jested
you have jested
he/she/it has jested
we have jested
you have jested
they have jested
Past Continuous
I was jesting
you were jesting
he/she/it was jesting
we were jesting
you were jesting
they were jesting
Past Perfect
I had jested
you had jested
he/she/it had jested
we had jested
you had jested
they had jested
Future
I will jest
you will jest
he/she/it will jest
we will jest
you will jest
they will jest
Future Perfect
I will have jested
you will have jested
he/she/it will have jested
we will have jested
you will have jested
they will have jested
Future Continuous
I will be jesting
you will be jesting
he/she/it will be jesting
we will be jesting
you will be jesting
they will be jesting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been jesting
you have been jesting
he/she/it has been jesting
we have been jesting
you have been jesting
they have been jesting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been jesting
you will have been jesting
he/she/it will have been jesting
we will have been jesting
you will have been jesting
they will have been jesting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been jesting
you had been jesting
he/she/it had been jesting
we had been jesting
you had been jesting
they had been jesting
Conditional
I would jest
you would jest
he/she/it would jest
we would jest
you would jest
they would jest
Past Conditional
I would have jested
you would have jested
he/she/it would have jested
we would have jested
you would have jested
they would have jested
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jest - a humorous anecdote or remark intended to provoke laughterjest - a humorous anecdote or remark intended to provoke laughter; "he told a very funny joke"; "he knows a million gags"; "thanks for the laugh"; "he laughed unpleasantly at his own jest"; "even a schoolboy's jape is supposed to have some ascertainable point"
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
gag line, punch line, tag line, laugh line - the point of a joke or humorous story
howler, sidesplitter, thigh-slapper, wow, belly laugh, riot, scream - a joke that seems extremely funny
blue joke, blue story, dirty joke, dirty story - an indelicate joke
ethnic joke - a joke at the expense of some ethnic group
funny, funny remark, funny story, good story - an account of an amusing incident (usually with a punch line); "she told a funny story"; "she made a funny"
in-joke - a joke that is appreciated only by members of some particular group of people
one-liner - a one-line joke
shaggy dog story - a long rambling joke whose humor derives from its pointlessness
sick joke - a joke in bad taste
sight gag, visual joke - a joke whose effect is achieved by visual means rather than by speech (as in a movie)
2.jest - activity characterized by good humor
diversion, recreation - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates; "scuba diving is provided as a diversion for tourists"; "for recreation he wrote poetry and solved crossword puzzles"; "drug abuse is often regarded as a form of recreation"
drollery, waggery - a quaint and amusing jest
leg-pull, leg-pulling - as a joke: trying to make somebody believe something that is not true
pleasantry - an agreeable or amusing remark; "they exchange pleasantries"
Verb1.jest - tell a joke; speak humorously; "He often jokes even when he appears serious"
communicate, intercommunicate - transmit thoughts or feelings; "He communicated his anxieties to the psychiatrist"
quip, gag - make jokes or quips; "The students were gagging during dinner"
fool around, horse around, arse around, fool - indulge in horseplay; "Enough horsing around--let's get back to work!"; "The bored children were fooling about"
pun - make a play on words; "Japanese like to pun--their language is well suited to punning"
blackguard, guy, jest at, laugh at, make fun, poke fun, ridicule, roast, rib - subject to laughter or ridicule; "The satirists ridiculed the plans for a new opera house"; "The students poked fun at the inexperienced teacher"; "His former students roasted the professor at his 60th birthday"
2.jest - act in a funny or teasing way
behave, act, do - behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"
antic, clown, clown around - act as or like a clown

jest

noun
1. joke, play, crack (slang), sally, gag (informal), quip, josh (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), banter, hoax, prank, wisecrack (informal), pleasantry, witticism, jape, bon mot It was a jest rather than a reproach.
verb
1. joke, kid (informal), mock, tease, sneer, jeer, quip, josh (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), scoff, banter, deride, chaff, gibe He enjoyed drinking and jesting with his cronies.
in jest as a joke, tongue in cheek, jokingly, for a laugh, in fun, flippantly, facetiously, light-heartedly, as humour, as a tease Many a true word spoken in jest.
Quotations
"a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy" [William Shakespeare Hamlet]
Proverbs
"Many a truth lie in jest"

jest

noun
1. An object of amusement or laughter:
2. Words or actions intended to excite laughter or amusement:
Informal: funny, gag.
Slang: ha-ha.
verb
1. To make jokes; behave playfully:
Informal: clown (around), fool around, fun.
2. To make fun or make fun of:
Chiefly British: quiz.
Idiom: poke fun at.
Translations
مُزاح، دُعابَهيَمْزَح، يَسْخَر من
žertžertovat
lave sjovmorsomhedspøgevittighed
vitsailla
nevetség tárgyatréfatréfálkozástréfálkozik
spaug, brandarispauga, grínast
juokautijuokdarys
jokotjoks

jest

[dʒest]
A. Nguasa f, broma f
in jesten broma, de guasa
B. VIbromear, estar de guasa
he was only jestinglo dijo en broma nada más, sólo estaba de guasa

jest

[ˈdʒɛst]
n (= joke) → plaisanterie f
in jest → en plaisantant
to say sth in jest → dire qch en plaisantant
vi (= joke) → plaisanter

jest

n (no pl) (= fun)Spaß m, (Aus also) → Spass m; (= joke also)Scherz m, → Witz m; in jestim Spaß
vischerzen, spaßen; you jest, sir! (old)Sie belieben zu scherzen, mein Herr! (old); to jest with somebodymit jdm spaßen; to jest about somethingüber etw (acc)Scherze or Witze machen

jest

[dʒɛst]
1. nscherzo, facezia
in jest → per scherzo
2. vischerzare

jest

(dʒest) noun
a joke; something done or said to cause amusement.
verb
to joke.
ˈjester noun
in former times, a man employed in the courts of kings, nobles etc to amuse them with jokes etc.
in jest
as a joke; not seriously. speaking in jest.

jest

n. broma, chiste;
v. bromear.
References in classic literature ?
Dimmesdale longed at least to shake hands with the tarry black-guard, and recreate himself with a few improper jests, such as dissolute sailors so abound with, and a volley of good, round, solid, satisfactory, and heaven-defying oaths
It will not do for me to find merit in American manners-- for are they not the standing butt for the jests of critical and polished Europe?
Excitement instantly seized the whole party: a running fire of raillery and jests was proceeding when Sam returned.
No doubt the old cheery publicity is a little embarrassing to the two most concerned, and the old marriage customs, the singing of the bride and bridegroom to their nuptial couch, the frank jests, the country horse-play, must have fretted the souls of many a lover before Shelley, who, it will be remembered, resented the choral celebrations of his Scotch landlord and friends by appearing at his bedroom door with a brace of pistols.
The one toper says fusty bandias, to which the other is obliged to reply, strike pantnere, and the Friar passes many jests on the King's want of memory, who sometimes forgets the words of action.
None of the men of the neighborhood had dared to join; they stood in the road whispering, and occasionally venturing to laugh at the jests of a couple of tramps who had stopped to see the fun, and who cared nothing for Sir Charles.
Raoul climbed the grand staircase at five minutes to twelve, did not linger to look at the motley dresses displayed all the way up the marble steps, one of the richest settings in the world, allowed no facetious mask to draw him into a war of wits, replied to no jests and shook off the bold familiarity of a number of couples who had already become a trifle too gay.
So, as I have told you, he placed Robin by his side, and he made much of him and laughed boisterously at his jests; though sooth to say, the laugh were come by easily, for Robin had never been in merrier mood, and his quips and jests soon put the whole table at a roar.
My jests, gentlemen, are of course in bad taste, jerky, involved, lacking self-confidence.
Nevertheless, when the name of the king was now and then uttered unthinkingly amid all these cardinal jests, a sort of gag seemed to close for a moment on all these jeering mouths.
And yet, instead of the silence and the solemnity demanded by the occasion, laughter and jests arose from the crowd.
This man, who had remained immovable as bronze when menaced by the mob -- not a muscle of whose face was stirred, either at Mazarin's witticisms or by the jests of the multitude -- seemed to the cardinal a peculiar being, who, having participated in past events similar to those now occurring, was calculated to cope with those now on the eve of taking place.