jewellery


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jewellery

(ˈdʒuːəlrɪ) or

jewelry

n
1. (Jewellery) objects that are worn for personal adornment, such as bracelets, rings, necklaces, etc, considered collectively
2. (Jewellery) the art or business of a jeweller
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jewellery - an adornment (as a bracelet or ring or necklace) made of precious metals and set with gems (or imitation gems)jewellery - an adornment (as a bracelet or ring or necklace) made of precious metals and set with gems (or imitation gems)
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
bead - a small ball with a hole through the middle
bijou - a small and delicately worked piece
bling, bling bling - flashy, ostentatious jewelry; "the rapper was loaded with bling"
bangle, bracelet - jewelry worn around the wrist for decoration
clip - an article of jewelry that can be clipped onto a hat or dress
cufflink - jewelry consisting of one of a pair of linked buttons used to fasten the cuffs of a shirt
earring - jewelry to ornament the ear; usually clipped to the earlobe or fastened through a hole in the lobe
jewel, precious stone, gem - a precious or semiprecious stone incorporated into a piece of jewelry
necklace - jewelry consisting of a cord or chain (often bearing gems) worn about the neck as an ornament (especially by women)
pin - a piece of jewelry that is pinned onto the wearer's garment
ring, band - jewelry consisting of a circlet of precious metal (often set with jewels) worn on the finger; "she had rings on every finger"; "he noted that she wore a wedding band"
tie clip - a piece of jewelry that holds a man's tie in place
gemstone, gem, stone - a crystalline rock that can be cut and polished for jewelry; "he had the gem set in a ring for his wife"; "she had jewels made of all the rarest stones"

jewellery

noun jewels, treasure, gems, trinkets, precious stones, ornaments, finery, regalia beautiful jewellery and silverware
Translations
حُلي، مُجَوْهَراتمُجَوْهَرَاتٌ
klenotnictvíklenotyšperky
smykkesmykker
korut
nakit
ékszerékszerekékszerészbolt
skartgripur
宝石類
보석류
klenotníctvoklenoty
nakit
nakit
smycken
เครื่องเพชรพลอย
đồ nữ trang

jewellery

jewelry (US) [ˈdʒuːəlrɪ]
A. Njoyas fpl, alhajas fpl
a piece of jewelleryuna joya
B. CPD jewellery box Njoyero m
jewelry store N (US) → joyería f

jewellery

[ˈdʒuːəlri] jewelry (US) nbijoux mpljewellery box nboîte f à bijoux

jewellery

, (US) jewelry
nSchmuck m no pl; a piece of jewelleryein Schmuckstück nt

jewellery

jewelry (Am) [ˈdʒuːəlrɪ] ngioielli mpl, gioie fpl
a piece of jewellery → un gioiello
jewellery box → (cofanetto) portagioie m inv

jewel

(ˈdʒuːəl) noun
a precious stone. rubies, emeralds and other jewels.
ˈjewelled , (American) ˈjeweled adjective
ornamented with jewels. a jewelled crown.
ˈjeweller , (American) ˈjeweler noun
a person who makes, or deals in, ornaments and other articles made of precious stones and metals.
ˈjewellery , (American) ˈjewelry noun
articles made or sold by a jeweller, and worn for personal adornment, eg bracelets, necklaces, brooches, rings etc.

jewellery

مُجَوْهَرَاتٌ šperky smykker Schmuck κοσμήματα joyas korut bijoux nakit gioielli 宝石類 보석류 sieraden smykker biżuteria jóias драгоценности smycken เครื่องเพชรพลอย mücevherat đồ nữ trang 珠宝类
References in classic literature ?
I did not know all the men who were sitting about, but I recognized a furniture salesman from Kansas City, a drug man, and Willy O'Reilly, who travelled for a jewellery house and sold musical instruments.
Miss Spenlow endeavoured,' said Miss Murdstone, 'to bribe me with kisses, work-boxes, and small articles of jewellery - that, of course, I pass over.
While he was putting up the other cast and coming down from the chair, the thought crossed my mind that all his personal jewellery was derived from like sources.
Such a man was not likely to neglect the clue of the tinder-box, and an inquiry was set on foot concerning a pedlar, name unknown, with curly black hair and a foreign complexion, carrying a box of cutlery and jewellery, and wearing large rings in his ears.
Yet, in the eye of sober judgment, the short close tunic and long mantle of the Saxons was a more graceful, as well as a more convenient dress, than the garb of the Normans, whose under garment was a long doublet, so loose as to resemble a shirt or waggoner's frock, covered by a cloak of scanty dimensions, neither fit to defend the wearer from cold or from rain, and the only purpose of which appeared to be to display as much fur, embroidery, and jewellery work, as the ingenuity of the tailor could contrive to lay upon it.
The peasant folk, who are naturally malicious, and when they have nothing to do can be malice itself, remarked all this, and took note of his finery and jewellery, piece by piece, and discovered that he had three suits of different colours, with garters and stockings to match; but he made so many arrangements and combinations out of them, that if they had not counted them, anyone would have sworn that he had made a display of more than ten suits of clothes and twenty plumes.
Passepartout wandered for several hours in the midst of this motley crowd, looking in at the windows of the rich and curious shops, the jewellery establishments glittering with quaint Japanese ornaments, the restaurants decked with streamers and banners, the tea-houses, where the odorous beverage was being drunk with saki, a liquor concocted from the fermentation of rice, and the comfortable smoking-houses, where they were puffing, not opium, which is almost unknown in Japan, but a very fine, stringy tobacco.
There meet my gentle, matchless brothers, there I come, the obscure poet, all unfit To wear the radiant jewellery of wit, And in their golden presence cloud the air.
But Vampa raised his head proudly; as to Teresa, her eyes sparkled when she thought of all the fine gowns and gay jewellery she could buy with this purse of gold.
Well, I've ho objections to advance you three guineas," said the landlord; "and if you like to send it me back and get the jewellery again, you can, you know.
As the beauties of our own land delight in bedecking themselves with fanciful articles of jewellery, suspending them from their ears, hanging them about their necks, and clasping them around their wrists; so Fayaway and her companions were in the habit of ornamenting themselves with similar appendages.
When we were at Vienna her twentieth birthday occurred, and as she was very fond of ornaments, we all took the opportunity of the splendid jewellers' shops in that Teutonic Paris to purchase her a birthday present of jewellery.