jig


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jig 1

 (jĭg)
n.
1.
a. Any of various lively dances in triple time.
b. The music for such a dance. Also called gigue.
2. A joke or trick. Used chiefly in the phrase The jig is up.
3. A typically metal fishing lure with one or more hooks, usually deployed with a jiggling motion on or near the bottom.
4. An apparatus for cleaning or separating crushed ore by agitation in water.
5. A device for guiding a tool or for holding machine work in place.
v. jigged, jig·ging, jigs
v.intr.
1. To dance or play a jig.
2. To move or bob up and down jerkily and rapidly.
3. To operate a jig.
v.tr.
1. To bob or jerk (something) up and down or to and fro.
2. To machine (an object) with the aid of a jig.
3. To separate or clean (ore) by shaking a jig.
Idiom:
in jig time Informal
Very quickly; rapidly.

[Origin unknown.]

jig 2

 (jĭg)
n. Offensive Slang
Used as a disparaging term for a black person.

[Probably shortening of jigaboo.]

jig

(dʒɪɡ)
n
1. (Dancing) any of several old rustic kicking and leaping dances
2. (Music, other) a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance, usually in six-eight time
3. (Mechanical Engineering) a mechanical device designed to hold and locate a component during machining and to guide the cutting tool
4. (Angling) angling any of various spinning lures that wobble when drawn through the water
5. (Mining & Quarrying) mining Also called: jigger a device for separating ore or coal from waste material by agitation in water
6. obsolete a joke or prank
vb, jigs, jigging or jigged
7. (Dancing) to dance (a jig)
8. to jerk or cause to jerk up and down rapidly
9. (Mechanical Engineering) (often foll by up) to fit or be fitted in a jig
10. (Mechanical Engineering) (tr) to drill or cut (a workpiece) in a jig
11. (Mining & Quarrying) mining to separate ore or coal from waste material using a jig
12. (Mechanical Engineering) (intr) to produce or manufacture a jig
13. slang Austral to play truant from school
[C16 (originally: a dance or the music for it; applied to various modern devices because of the verbal sense: to jerk up and down rapidly): of unknown origin]

jig1

(dʒɪg)

n., v. jigged, jig•ging. n.
1. a plate, box, or open frame for holding work and for guiding a machine tool to the work.
2. any of several devices that are jerked up and down in or pulled through the water to attract fish to a line.
3. an apparatus for washing coal or separating ore from gangue by shaking and washing.
4. a cloth-dyeing machine in which a roll of fabric is unwound, passed through a vat of dye, and then rewound onto another cylinder.
v.t.
5. to treat, cut, produce, etc., with a jig.
v.i.
6. to use a jig.
7. to fish with a jig.
[1855–60; probably akin to jig2, in sense “jerk to and fro”]

jig2

(dʒɪg)

n., v. jigged, jig•ging. n.
1. a rapid, lively, springy, irregular dance for one or more persons, usu. in triple meter.
2. a piece of music for such a dance.
3. Obs. prank; trick.
v.t.
4. to dance (a jig or any lively dance).
5. to sing or play in the time or rhythm of a jig: to jig a tune.
6. to cause to move with quick, jerky or bobbing motions.
v.i.
7. to dance or play a jig.
8. to move with a quick, jerky motion; hop; bob.
Idioms:
in jig time, with dispatch; rapidly.
[1550–60; in earliest sense “kind of dance” perhaps < Middle French giguer to frolic, gambol]
jig′like`, jig′gish, adj.

jig


Past participle: jigged
Gerund: jigging

Imperative
jig
jig
Present
I jig
you jig
he/she/it jigs
we jig
you jig
they jig
Preterite
I jigged
you jigged
he/she/it jigged
we jigged
you jigged
they jigged
Present Continuous
I am jigging
you are jigging
he/she/it is jigging
we are jigging
you are jigging
they are jigging
Present Perfect
I have jigged
you have jigged
he/she/it has jigged
we have jigged
you have jigged
they have jigged
Past Continuous
I was jigging
you were jigging
he/she/it was jigging
we were jigging
you were jigging
they were jigging
Past Perfect
I had jigged
you had jigged
he/she/it had jigged
we had jigged
you had jigged
they had jigged
Future
I will jig
you will jig
he/she/it will jig
we will jig
you will jig
they will jig
Future Perfect
I will have jigged
you will have jigged
he/she/it will have jigged
we will have jigged
you will have jigged
they will have jigged
Future Continuous
I will be jigging
you will be jigging
he/she/it will be jigging
we will be jigging
you will be jigging
they will be jigging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been jigging
you have been jigging
he/she/it has been jigging
we have been jigging
you have been jigging
they have been jigging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been jigging
you will have been jigging
he/she/it will have been jigging
we will have been jigging
you will have been jigging
they will have been jigging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been jigging
you had been jigging
he/she/it had been jigging
we had been jigging
you had been jigging
they had been jigging
Conditional
I would jig
you would jig
he/she/it would jig
we would jig
you would jig
they would jig
Past Conditional
I would have jigged
you would have jigged
he/she/it would have jigged
we would have jigged
you would have jigged
they would have jigged

jig

A lively sixteenth-century solo-step dance native to the British Isles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jig - music in three-four time for dancing a jigjig - music in three-four time for dancing a jig
dance music - music to dance to
2.jig - a fisherman's lure with one or more hooks that is jerked up and down in the water
fish lure, fisherman's lure - (angling) any bright artificial bait consisting of plastic or metal mounted with hooks and trimmed with feathers
3.jig - a device that holds a piece of machine work and guides the tools operating on it
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
4.jig - any of various old rustic dances involving kicking and leaping
folk dance, folk dancing - a style of dancing that originated among ordinary people (not in the royal courts)
Verb1.jig - dance a quick dance with leaping and kicking motions
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"

jig

verb skip, bob, prance, jiggle, shake, bounce, twitch, wobble, caper, wiggle, jounce Guests bopped and jigged the night away to disco beat.

jig

noun
An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
Translations
رَقْصَه شَعبِيَّه تُشْبِه الدَّبْكَهيَتَهَزْهَز
gigahopsat
hoppe op og nedjig
jigipenkkipidin
dzsigg
alòÿîudans; alòÿîutónlisthreyfast til
džigas
lēkātžīga
gigahopkať
cig dansıhoplamakzıplamak

jig

[dʒɪg]
A. N
1. (= dance, tune) → giga f
2. (Mech) → plantilla f (Min) → criba f (Rail) → gálibo m
B. VI (= dance) → bailar dando brincos
to jig along; jig up and down [person] → moverse a saltitos
to keep jigging up and downno poder estarse quieto

jig

[ˈdʒɪg] n
(= dance) → gigue m
(= tune) → gigue m
jig about
vise trémousser

jig

n
(= dance) lebhafter Volkstanz; she did a little jig (fig)sie vollführte einen Freudentanz
(Tech) → Spannvorrichtung f
vi (= dance)tanzen; (fig: also jig about) → herumhüpfen; to jig up and downSprünge machen, herumspringen
vt to jig a baby up and down on one’s kneeein Kind auf seinen Knien reiten lassen

jig

[dʒɪg] n (dance, tune) → giga

jig

(dʒig) noun
(a piece of music for) a type of lively dance.
verbpast tense, past participle jigged
to jump (about). Stop jigging about and stand still!
References in classic literature ?
But she let old Belsham rest, and when I ran back after my gloves this afternoon, there she was, so hard at the Vicar that she didn't hear me laugh as I danced a jig in the hall because of the good time coming.
As long as it was only stolen there was a chance to get it back, but if it's burned, the jig is up.
and dance she would, not in such court-like measures as she had learned abroad, but Some high-paced jig, or hop-skip rigadoon, befitting the brisk lasses at a rustic merry-making.
let's have a jig or two before we ride to anchor in Blanket Bay.
On the quarter-deck, the mates and harpooneers were dancing with the olive-hued girls who had eloped with them from the Polynesian Isles; while suspended in an ornamented boat, firmly secured aloft between the foremast and mainmast, three Long Island negroes, with glittering fiddle-bows of whale ivory, were presiding over the hilarious jig.
There was a red-eyed little Jew who came into the Close while I was loitering there, in company with a second little Jew whom he sent upon an errand; and while the messenger was gone, I remarked this Jew, who was of a highly excitable temperament, performing a jig of anxiety under a lamp-post and accompanying himself, in a kind of frenzy, with the words, "Oh Jaggerth, Jaggerth, Jaggerth
I ran sideling upon it, that way and this, as fast as I could, banging the proper keys with my two sticks, and made a shift to play a jig, to the great satisfaction of both their majesties; but it was the most violent exercise I ever underwent; and yet I could not strike above sixteen keys, nor consequently play the bass and treble together, as other artists do; which was a great disadvantage to my performance.
Now and then he would see a thin fin, like a big shark's fin, drifting along close to shore, and he knew that that was the Killer Whale, the Grampus, who eats young seals when he can get them; and Kotick would head for the beach like an arrow, and the fin would jig off slowly, as if it were looking for nothing at all.
HE has wriggled out and run away; and he is dancing a jig on the top of the cupboard!
from Salters, and for an hour and a half every soul aboard hung over his squid- jig - a piece of lead painted red and armed at the lower end with a circle of pins bent backward like half-opened umbrella ribs.
The struggles and wrangles of the lads for her hand in a jig were an amusement to her--no more; and when they became fierce she rebuked them.
I wouldn't jig her, sir, if I were you," says the nurse; "a very little upsets her.