jinn

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jin·ni

or jin·nee also djin·ni  (jĭn′ē, jĭ-nē′)
n. pl. jinn also djinn (jĭn)
In the Koran and Muslim tradition, a spirit often capable of assuming human or animal form and exercising supernatural influence over people.

[Arabic jinnī, demonic, demon, from jinn, demons, from janna, to cover, conceal; see gnn in Semitic roots.]
Usage Note: According to the Koran, humans share this world with another race of mortal beings, the jinn, that God created from pure, smokeless fire and endowed with supernatural powers. In Arabic, the noun jinn designates these beings as a group. An adjective jinnī, "belonging to the jinn," can be made from jinn by the addition of the suffix -ī. Jinnī can then itself be used as a noun with the sense "one belonging to the jinn, a jinni." In this way, the usual word for a single male member of the jinn is jinnī, while a single female is called a jinnīya, using the feminine form of jinnī. (This way of making singulars from nouns denoting groups is common in Arabic—the noun 'arab means "the Arabs, the Arab people," and its derivative 'arabī means "Arabic" and "an Arab.") Following Arabic usage, some writers in English use the English noun jinn only as a plural, to designate the group: These jinn are kindly, while those jinn are malevolent. The English noun jinni then fills the role of a singular for this noun: He met a kindly jinni in the desert. However, other writers in English take jinn as a singular noun designating a single member of the jinn race: He met a kindly jinn in the desert. These writers may then use the uninflected plural jinn, as in These jinn are kindly, and some even use a regularly formed English plural jinns, as in Those jinns are harmful.

jinn

(dʒɪn)
n
(Islam) (often functioning as singular) the plural of jinni

jinn

(dʒɪn)

also jin•ni

(dʒɪˈni, ˈdʒɪn i)

n., pl. jinns also jin•nis, (esp. collectively) jinn also jin•ni.
(in Islamic myth) any of a class of spirits, lower than the angels, capable of appearing in human and animal forms and influencing humankind.
[1675–85; pl. of Arabic jinnī demon]

jinn

An Arab name for a spirit.
Translations

jinn

nDschinn m
References in periodicals archive ?
This wisdom is to worship Him: {And I (Allh) created not the jinns and humans except they should worship Me (Alone).
The children are believed to be able to see and consequently touch the treasure, unlike humans, which sorcerers fear will anger the jinns and result in severe punishment, such as being banished to the underworld.
Interacting with Omanis added a cultural dimension to their explorations, enabling them to visit villages and meet local people, who brought the cavers honey or camelAEs milk and talked to them of jinns.
Another popular myth which seems to date back to ancient Arabia is that of jinns, also spelled djinns (genies).
July 4: The Emirati father accused in the case says in the court that he wanted to exorcise jinns from the bodies of his daughters Wudeema and Meera.
Some of those who practice ruqyah even commit sexual assaults on women, beat people, or convince patients they are possessed by jinns, said Othman Al-Othman, a consultant at the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice (Haia).
Birmingham Crown Court jurors had already heard how Mohammed Mumtaz, his parents, Zia Ul-Haq and Salma Aslam, and brotherin-law Hammad Hassan believed Mrs Mumtaz was "possessed" by Muslim evil spirits known as jinns.
The housemaid said she had read about sorcery, magic and conjuring up jinns while she was in Indonesia and said she could see in the boy's eyes that he was possessed, the paper reported.
The sangat of the Naths is made up of [the immortal] Sidhs and in the religion of Muhammad they are called Jinns, they who are without a guru and are unruly.
G) She was described as a sign for the mankind: "And We made her and her son Eisa (Jesus) a sign for mankind and jinns.
Jurors were told that family members believed Mrs Mumtaz was "possessed" by Muslim evil spirits known as jinns.
The island witnesses an intense battle between humans and jinns (genies).