jive

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jive

 (jīv)
n.
1.
a. Jazz or swing music.
b. The jargon of jazz musicians and enthusiasts.
2. Slang Deceptive, nonsensical, or glib talk: "the sexist, locker-room jive of men boasting and bonding" (Trip Gabriel).
v. jived, jiv·ing, jives
v.intr.
1. To play or dance to jive music.
2. Slang
a. To talk in an exaggerated, teasing, or misleading way.
b. To talk or chat: "You just jive in one big group, putting each other on, trying to top the last line" (Time).
3. (Usage Problem) To be in accord.
v.tr. Slang
To speak to (someone) in an exaggerated, teasing, or misleading way.
adj. Slang
Misleading, phony, or worthless: talking jive nonsense.

[Origin unknown.]

jiv′er n.
jiv′ey, jiv′y adj.
Usage Note: The verb jive is often used in place of its near sound-alike jibe to mean "to be compatible, agree." The Usage Panel views this as a mistake. In our 2004 survey, 93 percent of the Panel rejected the sentence The two accounts of the incident didn't quite jive.

jive

(dʒaɪv)
n
1. (Dancing) a style of lively and jerky dance performed to jazz and, later, to rock and roll, popular esp in the 1940s and 1950s
2. Also called: jive talk a variety of American slang spoken chiefly by Black people, esp jazz musicians
3.
a. slang chiefly US deliberately misleading or deceptive talk
b. (as modifier): jive talk.
vb
4. (Dancing) (intr) to dance the jive
5. slang chiefly US to mislead; tell lies (to)
[C20: of unknown origin]
ˈjiver n

jive

(dʒaɪv)

n., v. jived, jiv•ing,
adj. n.
1. swing music or early jazz.
2. the jargon associated with swing music and early jazz.
3. Slang. deceptive, exaggerated, or meaningless talk.
v.i.
4. to play jive.
5. to dance to jive; jitterbug.
6. Slang. to engage in kidding, teasing, or exaggeration.
v.t.
7. Slang. to tease; fool; kid.
adj.
8. Slang. insincere or deceptive.
[1925–30, Amer.; orig. obscure]
jiv′ey, adj. jiv•i•er, jiv•i•est.

jive


Past participle: jived
Gerund: jiving

Imperative
jive
jive
Present
I jive
you jive
he/she/it jives
we jive
you jive
they jive
Preterite
I jived
you jived
he/she/it jived
we jived
you jived
they jived
Present Continuous
I am jiving
you are jiving
he/she/it is jiving
we are jiving
you are jiving
they are jiving
Present Perfect
I have jived
you have jived
he/she/it has jived
we have jived
you have jived
they have jived
Past Continuous
I was jiving
you were jiving
he/she/it was jiving
we were jiving
you were jiving
they were jiving
Past Perfect
I had jived
you had jived
he/she/it had jived
we had jived
you had jived
they had jived
Future
I will jive
you will jive
he/she/it will jive
we will jive
you will jive
they will jive
Future Perfect
I will have jived
you will have jived
he/she/it will have jived
we will have jived
you will have jived
they will have jived
Future Continuous
I will be jiving
you will be jiving
he/she/it will be jiving
we will be jiving
you will be jiving
they will be jiving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been jiving
you have been jiving
he/she/it has been jiving
we have been jiving
you have been jiving
they have been jiving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been jiving
you will have been jiving
he/she/it will have been jiving
we will have been jiving
you will have been jiving
they will have been jiving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been jiving
you had been jiving
he/she/it had been jiving
we had been jiving
you had been jiving
they had been jiving
Conditional
I would jive
you would jive
he/she/it would jive
we would jive
you would jive
they would jive
Past Conditional
I would have jived
you would have jived
he/she/it would have jived
we would have jived
you would have jived
they would have jived
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jive - a style of jazz played by big bands popular in the 1930sjive - a style of jazz played by big bands popular in the 1930s; flowing rhythms but less complex than later styles of jazz
jazz - a genre of popular music that originated in New Orleans around 1900 and developed through increasingly complex styles
Verb1.jive - dance to jive music; dance the jive
dancing, terpsichore, dance, saltation - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"

jive

verb
Slang. To tease or mock good-humoredly:
Informal: kid, rib, ride.
Slang: rag, razz.
Translations
hämätätanssia

jive

[dʒaɪv]
A. N
1. (= music, dancing) → swing m
2. (US) (= big talk) → alardes mpl, palabrería f; (= nonsense) → chorradas fpl; (= slang used by Black people) (also jive talk) → jerga f (de la población negra norteamericana, en especial de los músicos de jazz)
don't give me all that jivedeja de decir chorradas
B. VI
1. (= dance) → bailar el swing
2. (= be kidding) → bromear

jive

[ˈdʒaɪv]
vi (= dance) → danser le rock, danser le swing
n
(= music) → rock m, swing m
(= dance) → rock m, swing m

jive

n
(= dance)Swing m
(US inf: = nonsense) don’t give me that jivehör bloß mit dem Quatsch auf (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
He's a juker and jiver, but it's kind of sticky now, so that helped.
1) Dancer 2) Prancer 3) Jiver CALL 0900 586 4395 and follow instructions (61p/ min) Or TEXT the word DREAMTOYS followed by a space then your answer (1, 2 or 3), your name, full address, postcode and email address to 85858 (PS1/ text)
1) Dancer 2) Prancer 3) Jiver Teksta Flying KEY Then CALL 0900 586 6727 and follow instructions (calls costs 61p/min).
My big Brother, one of the original Cunard Yanks the best Jiver on the Ascania and Franconia.
MERV the swerve, Ivor the Jiver and Dai Bread are just three of hundreds of nicknames found across Wales.
Jiver can leave punters dancing for joy at Catterick by claiming the Go Racing At Wetherby Tomorrow Handicap Hurdle.
I met my late husband Andy at the dancing and he was a great jiver.
Laurie was a great jiver and acrobat and he used to entertain us with his jiving and acrobatics skills.
Tate points to "the jiver parts of their program (like the sexist, anti-Semitic, black supremacist, pseudo-African mumbo-jumbo, paramilitary adventurist parts)" (199).
Mike and Zoe Hammond with Jiver at Hammond's yard, in Lower Broadheath.
Hammond, a former point-topoint rider, said: "I have 15 horses, mostly for Mrs Tainton, but unfortunately did not get my licence early enough to get The Villager and Jiver out on the better ground that they need.