jobbing


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

job 1

 (jŏb)
n.
1.
a. A regular activity performed in exchange for payment, especially as one's trade, occupation, or profession: Her job is doing drug research.
b. A position of employment: How many jobs are open at the factory?
2.
a. A task that must be done: Let's finish this job before we start another.
b. A specified duty or responsibility: Your job is to watch the kids while we're away. See Synonyms at task.
c. Informal A difficult or strenuous task: It's a real job getting people to help out at these events.
3.
a. A specific piece of work to be done for a set fee: an expensive repair job.
b. The object to be worked on: Those overgrown shrubs are a big job.
c. Something resulting from or produced by work: I like the job they did on those shrubs.
4. An operation done to improve one's appearance, or the result of such an operation. Often used in combination: a face job.
5. Computers A program application that may consist of several steps but is performed as a single logical unit.
6. Informal A state of affairs: Their marriage was a bad job from the start. It's a good job that we left early to avoid the traffic.
7. Informal A criminal act, especially a robbery: a bank job.
8. Informal An example of a specified type, especially of something made or constructed. Often used in combination: a new building that is just another glass and steel job; a cowboy hat that is one of those ten-gallon jobs.
v. jobbed, job·bing, jobs
v.intr.
1. To work at odd jobs.
2. To work by the piece.
3. To act as a jobber.
v.tr.
1. To purchase (merchandise) from manufacturers and sell it to retailers.
2. To arrange for (contracted work) to be done in portions by others; subcontract.
3. To transact (official business) dishonestly for private profit.
Idioms:
do a job on
1. To damage, harm, or worsen: The stylist did a real job on my hair.
2. To defecate on.
on the job
1. Paying close attention; on the alert.
2. At work; at one's place of business: Employees are not allowed to smoke while on the job.

[Perhaps from obsolete jobbe, piece, alteration of Middle English gobbe, lump; see gob1.]

job 2

 (jŏb) Chiefly Southern
tr. & intr.v. jobbed, job·bing, jobs
To jab or make a jab.
n.
A jab.

[Middle English jobben, of imitative origin.]

Job 1

 (jōb)
In the Bible, an upright man whose faith in God survived the test of repeated calamities.

[Hebrew 'iyyôb; see ʔb in Semitic roots.]

Job 2

 (jōb)
n.
See Table at Bible.

[After Job.]

jobbing

(ˈdʒɒbɪŋ)
adj (prenominal)
working on occasional jobs or by the piece rather than in a regular job: a jobbing gardener.
Translations

jobbing

[ˈdʒɒbɪŋ]
A. ADJ (Brit) [gardener, carpenter] → que trabaja a destajo, destajista
jobbing printerimpresor m de circulares, folletos
B. N (St Ex) → agiotaje m

jobbing

[ˈdʒɒbɪŋ] adj (British) [workman] → à la tâche, à la journéejob centre Jobcentre [ˈdʒɒbsɛntə] n (British)ANPE f, Agence f nationale pour l'emploijob club n (British)club m d'entraide pour chômeursjob creation ncréation f d'emploisjob creation scheme nplan m de création d'emploisjob description ndescription f de postejob hunt job search nrecherche f d'emploijob hunting nchasse f à l'emploijob interview nentretien m d'embauche

jobbing

adjGelegenheits-; jobbing worker/actorGelegenheitsarbeiter(in) m(f)/-schauspieler m
n
(= casual work)Gelegenheitsarbeit f
(St Ex) → Börsen- or Effektenhandel m

jobbing

[ˈdʒɒbɪŋ] adj (Brit) (worker, gardener) → a cottimo
References in classic literature ?
Among these were a couple of cyclists, a jobbing gardener I employed sometimes, a girl carrying a baby, Gregg the butcher and his little boy, and two or three loafers and golf caddies who were accustomed to hang about the railway station.
Mechanicians, natural philosophers, soldiers, sailors, petitioners, memorialists, people with grievances, people who wanted to prevent grievances, people who wanted to redress grievances, jobbing people, jobbed people, people who couldn't get rewarded for merit, and people who couldn't get punished for demerit, were all indiscriminately tucked up under the foolscap paper of the Circumlocution Office.
He, too, had been formerly used in the business, but was now entombed by an honest jobbing tailor of the district in a perfect Sepulchre of coat and gaiters, sealed with ponderous buttons.