jocular


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

joc·u·lar

 (jŏk′yə-lər)
adj.
1. Characterized by joking.
2. Given to joking.

[Latin ioculāris, droll, from ioculus, diminutive of iocus, joke; see yek- in Indo-European roots.]

joc′u·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
joc′u·lar·ly adv.

jocular

(ˈdʒɒkjʊlə)
adj
1. characterized by joking and good humour
2. meant lightly or humorously; facetious
[C17: from Latin joculāris, from joculus little joke]
jocularity n
ˈjocularly adv

joc•u•lar

(ˈdʒɒk yə lər)

adj.
given to or characterized by jesting; waggish; facetious: jocular remarks.
[1620–30; < Latin joculāris, derivative of jocul(us) little joke]
joc`u•lar′i•ty, n.
joc′u•lar•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.jocular - characterized by jokes and good humor
humorous, humourous - full of or characterized by humor; "humorous stories"; "humorous cartoons"; "in a humorous vein"
Adv.1.jocular - with humor; "they tried to deal with this painful subject jocularly"

jocular

jocular

adjective
Intended to excite laughter or amusement:
Translations

jocular

[ˈdʒɒkjʊləʳ] ADJ [person] → gracioso; (= merry) → alegre; [manner] → bromista, chistoso; [remark, reply] → jocoso, divertido

jocular

[ˈdʒɒkjʊr] adj [mood] → jovial(e), enjoué(e); [remark, reference] → facétieux/euse

jocular

adjlustig, spaßig, witzig; to be in a jocular moodzu Scherzen or Späßen aufgelegt sein

jocular

[ˈdʒɒkjʊləʳ] adj (person) → gioviale; (remark) → scherzoso/a
References in classic literature ?
Long practised in all the subtle arts of his race, he drew, with great dexterity and quickness, the fantastic shadow that the natives were accustomed to consider as the evidence of a friendly and jocular disposition.
Another would be jocular in tone, slapping you on the back, so to speak.
She did it gloomily until she came to ten, but when she got into two figures she became more hopeful, and, as the time advanced, even jocular.
I was afraid he would ask me to give him the berth in some ghastly jocular hint that I could not refuse to take.
Hem—why, I guess I am not far out of the way,” returned Elnathan, endeavoring to imitate the expression of the other’s countenance, by looking jocular.
Stuart by no means relished such equivocal joking, but it was not his policy to get into a quarrel; so he joined with the best grace he could assume in the merriment of the jocular giant; and, to console the latter for the refusal of the horse, made him a present of twenty charges of powder.
Babcock's birthplace, and, for reasons too recondite to unfold, his visit there always assumed in his mind a jocular cast.
One of such streets is the Cannebiere, and the jest: "If Paris had a Cannebiere it would be a little Marseilles" is the jocular expression of municipal pride.
It was in no jocular strain, yet it was with simplicity, that she inquired, weighing the money in her two palms: "Don't you think it's too much?
The soldiers say it feels easier without boots," said Captain Tushin smiling shyly in his uncomfortable position, evidently wishing to adopt a jocular tone.
When he had found his leaflet, and offered a few jocular hints upon keeping papers in order, the typewriting would stop abruptly, and Mrs.
The talk meanwhile raced past her, and when Richard suddenly stated in a jocular tone of voice, "I'm sure Miss Vinrace, now, has secret leanings towards Catholicism," she had no idea what to answer, and Helen could not help laughing at the start she gave.