joes


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Related to joes: Sloppy Joes

jo

 (jō)
n. pl. joes Scots
Sweetheart; dear.

[Alteration of joy.]

joes

(dʒəʊz)
pl n
the joes informal Austral a fit of depression
[short for the Joe Blakes]
References in classic literature ?
I have seen doubloons before now in my voyagings; your doubloons of old Spain, your doubloons of Peru, your doubloons of Chili, your doubloons of Bolivia, your doubloons of Popayan; with plenty of gold moidores and pistoles, and joes, and half joes, and quarter joes.
Why, here's three Js, and three Os, and three J-O, Joes in it, Pip
Joe called "Pompeyed," or (as I render it) pampered.
One night, I was sitting in the chimney-corner with my slate, expending great efforts on the production of a letter to Joe.
There was no indispensable necessity for my communicating with Joe by letter, inasmuch as he sat beside me and we were alone.
We used to get the broad joes, in the old war, as plenty as the bears be now.
It was not very long, counting by years, before there was a red-faced little girl, another red-faced little boy, and a whole troop of girls and boys: so that, go to Chigwell when you would, there would surely be seen, either in the village street, or on the green, or frolicking in the farm-yard--for it was a farm now, as well as a tavern--more small Joes and small Dollys than could be easily counted.
It was not very long, you may be sure, before Joe Willet and Dolly Varden were made husband and wife, and with a handsome sum in bank
It was a long time too--for Never, as the proverb says, is a long day-- before they forgot to have an interest in wounded soldiers at the Maypole, or before Joe omitted to refresh them, for the sake of his old campaign; or before the serjeant left off looking in there, now and then; or before they fatigued themselves, or each other, by talking on these occasions of battles and sieges, and hard weather and hard service, and a thousand things belonging to a soldier's life.
Mr Willet the elder, having been by some extraordinary means possessed with the idea that Joe wanted to be married, and that it would be well for him, his father, to retire into private life, and enable him to live in comfort, took up his abode in a small cottage at Chigwell; where they widened and enlarged the fireplace for him, hung up the boiler, and furthermore planted in the little garden outside the front-door, a fictitious Maypole; so that he was quite at home directly.