Johnson

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john·son

 (jŏn′sən) Vulgar Slang
n.
The penis.

[From the name Johnson.]

Johnson

(ˈdʒɒnsən)
n
1. (Biography) Amy 1903–41, British aviator, who made several record flights, including those to Australia (1930) and to Cape Town and back (1936)
2. (Biography) Andrew 1808–75, US Democrat statesman who was elected vice president under the Republican Abraham Lincoln; 17th president of the US (1865–69), became president after Lincoln's assassination. His lenience towards the South after the American Civil War led to strong opposition from radical Republicans, who tried to impeach him
3. (Biography) (Alexander) Boris (de Pfeffel). born 1964, British Conservative politician; mayor of London from 2008
4. (Biography) Earvin (ˈɜːvɪn), known as Magic. born 1959, US basketball player
5. (Biography) Eyvind (ˈevɪnt). 1900–76, Swedish novelist and writer, whose novels include the Krilon trilogy (1941–43): joint winner of the Nobel prize for literature 1974
6. (Biography) Jack 1878–1946, US boxer; world heavyweight champion (1908–15)
7. (Biography) Lionel (Pigot) 1867–1902, British poet and critic, best known for his poems "Dark Angel" and "By the Statue of King Charles at Charing Cross"
8. (Biography) Lyndon Baines known as LBJ. 1908–73, US Democrat statesman; 36th president of the US (1963–69). His administration carried the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965, but he lost popularity by increasing US involvement in the Vietnam war
9. (Biography) Martin. born 1970, English Rugby Union footballer; captain of the England team that won the World Cup in 2003.
10. (Biography) Michael (Duane) born 1967, US athlete: world (1995) and Olympic (1996) 200- and 400-metre gold medallist
11. (Biography) Philip (Cortelyou). 1906–2005, US architect and writer; his buildings include the New York State Theater (1964) and the American Telephone and Telegraph building (1978–83), both in New York
12. (Biography) Robert ?1898–1937, US blues singer and guitarist
13. (Biography) Samuel known as Dr. Johnson. 1709–84, British lexicographer, critic, and conversationalist, whose greatest works are his Dictionary (1755), his edition of Shakespeare (1765), and his Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets (1779–81). His fame, however, rests as much on Boswell's biography of him as on his literary output

John•son

(ˈdʒɒn sən)

n.
1. Andrew, 1808–75, 17th president of the U.S. 1865–69.
2. Ey•vind (ˈeɪ vɪn) 1900–76, Swedish writer: Nobel prize 1974.
3. James Price, 1891–1955, U.S. pianist and jazz composer.
4. Lyndon Baines, 1908–73, 36th president of the U.S. 1963–69.
5. Philip C(ortelyou), born 1906, U.S. architect.
6. Richard Mentor, 1780–1850, vice president of the U.S. 1837–41.
7. Samuel ( “Dr. Johnson” ), 1709–84, English lexicographer and writer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Johnson - English writer and lexicographer (1709-1784)Johnson - English writer and lexicographer (1709-1784)
2.Johnson - 36th President of the United StatesJohnson - 36th President of the United States; was elected vice president and succeeded Kennedy when Kennedy was assassinated (1908-1973)
3.Johnson - 17th President of the United StatesJohnson - 17th President of the United States; was elected vice president and succeeded Lincoln when Lincoln was assassinated; was impeached but acquitted by one vote (1808-1875)
Translations
Jensen
Johansen
Johansson

johnson

n (US sl: = penis) → Schwanz m (sl)
References in classic literature ?
The reason of this necessity was, that there were so many Johnsons in New Bedford, it was already quite difficult to distinguish between them.
Johnson took a deep and lively interest in our wel- fare.
Nathan Johnson (of whom I can say with a grateful heart, "I was hungry, and he gave me meat; I was thirsty, and he gave me drink; I was a stranger, and he took me in") lived in a neater house; dined at a better table; took, paid for, and read, more newspapers; better understood the moral, religious, and political character of the nation,--than nine tenths of the slaveholders in Tal- bot county Maryland.
Johnson kindly let me have his wood-horse and saw, and I very soon found myself a plenty of work.
He was living when I was here before; but, you know, at that time I was travelling with the Johnsons, who are not aesthetic, and who used to make me feel rather ashamed of my artistic temperament.
When I was with the Johnsons everything was superficial; and, as regards life, everything was brought down to the question of right and wrong.
Terence and Rachel sat watching them through their half-closed eyelids-- the Johnsons, the Parkers, the Baileys, the Simmons', the Lees, the Morleys, the Campbells, the Gardiners.
I can't believe that my three best friends would betray me" Eventually, either Rayburn or Baker converted Kerr, who apologized to the Johnsons for "los[ing] my head "
There are a lot of Johnsons,'' said Johnson, who was clocked at 12.
Within a month, the two Johnsons had signed a letter of intent committing them to do the deal.
From those humble beginnings, the company grew and prospered under three generations of Johnsons.
This resort, along with the other Howard Johnsons scheduled to open in Japan this year, clearly indicates our commitment to extending Howard Johnson's high level of service to international travelers around the world.

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