join in


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Translations
يَشْتَرِك في
přidat se
deltage i
taka òátt í
pridať sa

w>join in

vi (in activity) → mitmachen (prep obj bei); (in game also) → mitspielen (prep obj bei); (in demonstration also, in protest) → sich anschließen (→ prep obj +dat); (in conversation) → sich beteiligen (→ prep obj an +dat); join in, everybody! (in song etc) → alle (mitmachen)!; everybody joined in the chorussie sangen alle zusammen den Refrain, alle fielen in den Refrain ein; he didn’t want to join in the funer wollte nicht mitmachen

join

(dʒoin) verb
1. (often with up, ~on etc) to put together or connect. The electrician joined the wires (up) wrongly; You must join this piece (on) to that piece; He joined the two stories together to make a play; The island is joined to the mainland by a sandbank at low tide.
2. to connect (two points) eg by a line, as in geometry. Join point A to point B.
3. to become a member of (a group). Join our club!
4. (sometimes with up) to meet and come together (with). This lane joins the main road; Do you know where the two rivers join?; They joined up with us for the remainder of the holiday.
5. to come into the company of. I'll join you later in the restaurant.
noun
a place where two things are joined. You can hardly see the joins in the material.
join forces
to come together for united work or action. We would do better if we joined forces (with each other).
join hands
to clasp one another's hands (eg for dancing). Join hands with your partner; They joined hands in a ring.
join in
to take part (in). We're playing a game – do join in!; He would not join in the game.
join up
to become a member of an armed force. He joined up in 1940.
References in classic literature ?
Again, as Titus Livius noteth, in the case of Antiochus and the AEtolians, There are sometimes great effects, of cross lies; as if a man, that negotiates between two princes, to draw them to join in a war against the third, doth extol the forces of either of them, above measure, the one to the other: and sometimes he that deals between man and man, raiseth his own credit with both, by pretending greater interest than he hath in either.
Joshua Rann, having a slight touch of rheumatism, did not join in the ringing of the bells this morning, and, looking on with some contempt at these informal greetings which required no official co-operation from the clerk, began to hum in his musical bass, "Oh what a joyful thing it is," by way of preluding a little to the effect he intended to produce in the wedding psalm next Sunday.
let both sides join in creating not a new balance of power.