jollities


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jol·li·ty

 (jŏl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. jol·li·ties
Convivial merriment or celebration.

jollities

(ˈdʒɒlɪtɪz)
pl n
Brit a party or celebration
References in periodicals archive ?
Jashn-e-Chiraghan will be an exuberant explosion of parades and jollities where the participants will be able to spot the most enthralling activities.
He would have been able to find out for himself just how full his pockets would be stuffed, how much he loves the deprived able-bodied who park in the disabled slots, how he enjoys going into places round the back with the bins, never being able to find a lavatory, and all the other jollities which will be available to him.
From Jane Austen at Sanditon to Graham Greene in Brighton, via the Prince Regent's decadence and Billy Butlin with his gruesome holiday camps, we get a fairly undemanding run-through of English popular manifestations of japes, jollities and mildly bad behaviour by the briny (roods and rockers ineffectually scuffling amid the Margate deckchairs).
The merry interval jollities with mulled wine and mince pies heralded interesting and effective use of off-stage effects for the ancient Echo t Carol plus a modern James MacMil l -lan commission as part of Ex Cathedra's 40th birthday celebrations, and covering all areas of the church.
He contributed to the New Sporting Magazine his comic sketches of Mr Jorrocks, the sporting grocer, collected as Jorrocks Jaunts and Jollities in 1838 with illustrations by Phiz.
Litvinenko's story was emerging over the weekend, President Bush was pictured exchanging jollities with his ''friend Vladimir'' at a summit in Vietnam.