jollities


Also found in: Thesaurus.

jol·li·ty

 (jŏl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. jol·li·ties
Convivial merriment or celebration.

jollities

(ˈdʒɒlɪtɪz)
pl n
Brit a party or celebration
References in classic literature ?
Add to this picture a jolly, crackling, rollicking fire, going rejoicingly up a great wide chimney,--the outer door and every window being set wide open, and the calico window-curtain flopping and snapping in a good stiff breeze of damp raw air,--and you have an idea of the jollities of a Kentucky tavern.
He would have been able to find out for himself just how full his pockets would be stuffed, how much he loves the deprived able-bodied who park in the disabled slots, how he enjoys going into places round the back with the bins, never being able to find a lavatory, and all the other jollities which will be available to him.
The 1970's work - which had to change its name from L'Heure bleu because it clashed with Guerlain's best selling perfume of the period - shows the jollities of the dancers and their hedonistic lifestyles soon turn round as their land is on the brink of war.
The merry interval jollities with mulled wine and mince pies heralded interesting and effective use of off-stage effects for the ancient Echo t Carol plus a modern James MacMil l -lan commission as part of Ex Cathedra's 40th birthday celebrations, and covering all areas of the church.