joule

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joule

 (jo͞ol, joul)
n. Abbr. J or j
1. The International System unit of electrical, mechanical, and thermal energy.
2.
a. A unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere is passed through a resistance of one ohm for one second.
b. A unit of energy equal to the work done when a force of one newton acts through a distance of one meter. See Table at measurement.

[After James Prescott Joule.]

Joule

(dʒuːl)
n
(Biography) James Prescott. 1818–89, English physicist, who evaluated the mechanical equivalent of heat and contributed to the study of heat and electricity

joule

(dʒuːl)
n
(Units) the derived SI unit of work or energy; the work done when the point of application of a force of 1 newton is displaced through a distance of 1 metre in the direction of the force. 1 joule is equivalent to 1 watt-second, 107 ergs, 0.2390 calories, or 0.738 foot-pound. Symbol: J
[C19: named after James Prescott Joule]

joule

(dʒul, dʒaʊl)

n.
the SI unit of work or energy, equal to the work done by a force of one newton when its point of application moves through a distance of one meter in the direction of the force. Abbr.: J, j
[1885–90; after J. P. Joule]

Joule

(dʒul, dʒaʊl)

n.
James Prescott, 1818–89, English physicist.

joule

(jo͞ol, joul)
A unit used to measure energy or work. One joule is equal to the work done when a force of one newton acts over a distance of one meter.

joule

1. A unit of work or energy transfer. One joule is equal to work done by a force of one newton moved about 1 m in the direction of the force.
2. (J) A unit of energy equal to the work done when a force of one newton is applied through a distance of one meter. Used instead of calorie: 1 J = 0.239 cal. Named after the British physicist J.P. Joule (1818–89).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.joule - a unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one secondjoule - a unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one second
energy unit, heat unit, work unit - a unit of measurement for work
erg - a cgs unit of work or energy; the work done by a force of one dyne acting over a distance of one centimeter
2.Joule - English physicist who established the mechanical theory of heat and discovered the first law of thermodynamics (1818-1889)
Translations
joule

joule

[dʒuːl] Njulio m, joule m

joule

[ˈdʒuːl] njoule m

joule

n (Phys) → Joule nt
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