journal


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Related to journal: Online journal, Science journal

jour·nal

 (jûr′nəl)
n.
1.
a. A personal record of occurrences, experiences, and reflections kept on a regular basis; a diary.
b. An official record of daily proceedings, as of a legislative body.
c. Nautical A ship's log.
2. Accounting
a. A daybook.
b. A book of original entry in a double-entry system, listing all transactions and indicating the accounts to which they belong.
3. A newspaper.
4. A periodical presenting articles on a particular subject: a medical journal.
5. The part of a machine shaft or axle supported by a bearing.

[Middle English, breviary, from Old French, daily, breviary, from Late Latin diurnālis, daily; see diurnal.]

journal

(ˈdʒɜːnəl)
n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a newspaper or periodical
2. a book in which a daily record of happenings, etc, is kept
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an official record of the proceedings of a legislative body
4. (Accounting & Book-keeping) accounting
a. Also called: Book of Original Entry one of several books in which transactions are initially recorded to facilitate subsequent entry in the ledger
b. another name for daybook
5. (Mechanical Engineering) the part of a shaft or axle in contact with or enclosed by a bearing
6. (Mechanical Engineering) a plain cylindrical bearing to support a shaft or axle
[C14: from Old French: daily, from Latin diurnālis; see diurnal]

jour•nal

(ˈdʒɜr nl)
n.
1. a daily record, as of occurrences, experiences, or observations.
2. a newspaper, esp. a daily one.
3. a periodical or magazine, esp. one published for a group, learned society, or profession.
4. a record, usu. daily, of the proceedings and transactions of a legislative body or an organization.
5. (in double-entry bookkeeping) a book into which all transactions are entered before being posted into the ledger.
6. a log or logbook.
7. the portion of a shaft or axle contained by a plain bearing.
v.t.
8. to enter in a journal.
[1325–75; Middle English < Old French journal daily (adj. and n.) < Late Latin diurnālis diurnal]

journal

A journal is a magazine that deals with a specialized subject. Many magazines have Journal as part of their name.

...the British Medical Journal.
All our results are published in scientific journals.

A journal is also a kind of diary in which you keep a record of events or progress.

My doctor told me to keep a journal of everything I ate.

Be Careful!
Don't refer to a newspaper as a 'journal'.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.journal - a daily written record of (usually personal) experiences and observationsjournal - a daily written record of (usually personal) experiences and observations
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
blog, web log - a shared on-line journal where people can post diary entries about their personal experiences and hobbies; "postings on a blog are usually in chronological order"
2.journal - a periodical dedicated to a particular subject; "he reads the medical journals"
periodical - a publication that appears at fixed intervals
annals - reports of the work of a society or learned body etc
3.journal - a ledger in which transactions have been recorded as they occurredjournal - a ledger in which transactions have been recorded as they occurred
account book, book of account, ledger, leger, book - a record in which commercial accounts are recorded; "they got a subpoena to examine our books"
4.journal - a record book as a physical object
book, volume - physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop"
daybook, ledger - an accounting journal as a physical object; "he bought a new daybook"
diary - a personal journal (as a physical object)
5.journal - the part of the axle contained by a bearing
axle - a shaft on which a wheel rotates

journal

noun
1. magazine, record, review, register, publication, bulletin, chronicle, gazette, periodical, zine (informal) All our results are published in scientific journals.
2. newspaper, paper, daily, weekly, monthly, tabloid He was a spokesperson for The New York Times and some other journals.
3. diary, record, history, log, notebook, chronicle, annals, yearbook, commonplace book, daybook On the plane he wrote in his journal.
Translations
مَجَلَّه ، جَريدَهمُذَكَّرَه، دَفْتَر يَوْمِيّات
deníkčasopis
dagbogtidsskrift
diaarierikoisaikakauslehtilokilokikirjapäiväkirja
dagbóktímarit
žurnalasžurnalistasžurnalistikažurnalistinis
dienasgrāmatažurnāls
dnevnikrevija
dergigünlükhatıra defterimecmua

journal

[ˈdʒɜːnl]
A. N
1. (= diary) → diario m (Naut) → diario m de navegación
2. (= periodical) → periódico m; (= magazine) → revista f
3. (Mech) → gorrón m, muñón m
B. CPD journal bearing Ncojinete m

journal

[ˈdʒɜːrnəl] n
(= magazine) → revue f
(= diary) → journal m
to keep a journal → tenir un journal
to keep a journal of sth (= record) → tenir un journal de qch

journal

n
(= magazine)Zeitschrift f; (= newspaper)Zeitung f
(= diary)Tagebuch nt; to keep a journalTagebuch führen
(Naut) → Logbuch nt, → Bordbuch nt; (Comm) → Journal nt; (= daybook)Tagebuch nt; (Jur) → Gerichtsakten pl
(of fax machine)Sendebericht m; (Mech) → Achszapfen m, → Achsschenkel m

journal

[ˈdʒɜːnl] n (periodical) → rivista (specializzata); (newspaper) → giornale m; (diary) → diario (Book-keeping) → brogliaccio

journal

(ˈdʒəːnl) noun
1. a magazine or other regularly published paper (eg of a society). the British Medical Journal.
2. a diary giving an account of each day's activities.
ˈjournalism noun
the business of running, or writing for, newspapers or magazines.
ˈjournalist noun
a writer for a newspaper, magazine etc.
ˌjournaˈlistic adjective
(of style of writing) like that of a journalist, colourful and racy.

journal

n. diario.
References in classic literature ?
Cutter would come home at noon, find the mutilated journal in the paper-rack, and triumphantly fit the clipping into the space from which it had been cut.
In his chamber, he said: "First, I kept a journal; then by and by, after years, I took the journal and turned it into a book.
Slightly observant of the smoky lights; of the people, pipe in mouth, playing with limp cards and yellow dominoes; of the one bare- breasted, bare-armed, soot-begrimed workman reading a journal aloud, and of the others listening to him; of the weapons worn, or laid aside to be resumed; of the two or three customers fallen forward asleep, who in the popular high-shouldered shaggy black spencer looked, in that attitude, like slumbering bears or dogs; the two outlandish customers approached the counter, and showed what they wanted.
Miss Mills and her journal were my sole consolation at this period.
We give the fact as it occurs in Bannatyne's Journal, only premising that the Journalist held his master's opinions, both with respect to the Earl of Cassilis as an opposer of the king's party, and as being a detester of the practice of granting church revenues to titulars, instead of their being devoted to pious uses, such as the support of the clergy, expense of schools, and the relief of the national poor.
I use heaps of postage stamps, pay the expenses of many indifferent lecturers, defray the cost of printing reams of pamphlets and hand-bills which hail the laborer flatteringly as the salt of the earth, write and edit a little socialist journal, and do what lies in my power generally.
Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence For the Independent Journal.
Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered For the Independent Journal Wednesday, February 20, 1788
Dick, who had heard nothing of the matter, was up first on that inauspicious day, and took the journal to an arbour in the garden.
My household work is done, so I shall take his foreign journal, and lock myself up in my room and read it.
Since his appointment to the office of sheriff and his consequent absences from home, he had employed Benjamin to make memoranda on a slate, of whatever might be thought worth remembering, which, on his return, were regularly transferred to the journal with proper notations of the time, manner, and other little particulars.
We proceed now with the journal, as transcribed by Mr.