journalese


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

jour·nal·ese

 (jûr′nə-lēz′, -lēs′)
n.
The style of writing often held to be characteristic of newspapers and magazines, distinguished by clichés, sensationalism, and triteness of thought.

journalese

(ˌdʒɜːnəˈliːz)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) derogatory a superficial cliché-ridden style of writing regarded as typical of newspapers

jour•nal•ese

(ˌdʒɜr nlˈiz, -ˈis)

n.
a style of writing regarded as typical of newspapers and magazines.
[1880–85]

journalese

language typical of journalists and newspapers or magazines, characterized by use of neologism and unusual syntax. Also called newspaperese.
See also: Media
language typical of journalists and newspapers or magazines, characterized by use of neologism and unusual syntax. Also called newspaperese.
See also: Language Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.journalese - the style in which newspapers are written
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
luridness, sensationalism - the journalistic use of subject matter that appeals to vulgar tastes; "the tabloids relied on sensationalism to maintain their circulation"
Translations

journalese

[ˈdʒɜːnəˈliːz] N (pej) → jerga f periodística

journalese

[ˌdʒɜːrnəˈliːz] n (pejorative)jargon m journalistique

journalese

nZeitungs- or Pressejargon m

journalese

[ˈdʒɜːnəˈliːz] n (pej) → giornalese
References in classic literature ?
The joyful journalese revealed that it was beyond question their boy, and it soothed Mrs.
In Journalese, to perform upon a musical instrument; as, "He
She was often a reluctant journalist, and disparaged her own collection Journalese.
The sections in journalese are partly to blame, but larger flaws include the flatness of the characters, their pedestrian conversations or pompous monologues, and the lack of any profundity to their inner lives.
Once you've used the word "fight" once, you don't want to use it again, so people resort to journalese nonsense about melees and fracas).
I can't comment on Goldberg's explicit political positions themselves because he often hides them under his bloke-next-door journalese.
One could wish that his generally dignified prose had not been marred by occasional lapses into colloquialism and journalese ("strut his stuff," "too cute," "terrible goofiness," "one-upping Marlowe," and the like), but these are minor stumbles and do not lessen the impressiveness of his achievement.
Referring to the above quoted passage in Justice Robertson's decision, he comments: "With all due respect to my learned colleague, it is this type of egregious journalese the relevance of which I cannot fathom that has made it impossible for me to appreciate his reasoning.
The phrase 'strongly support' used for one category only was not factual analysis; it was lazy and misleading journalese.
You can put that down as the definition of "firestorm" in your dictionary of journalese.
Indeed, sometimes the author's penchant for journalese gets rather out of hand.
Its literary style is interesting, standard discursive recitation aggressively interspersed with journalese, televisionese, slang and colloquialisms, all uttered no doubt as a virile reposte to the effete idealists, Hemingway to their Henr yJames.