journalist

(redirected from Journalists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

jour·nal·ist

 (jûr′nə-lĭst)
n.
1. One whose occupation is journalism.
2. One who keeps a journal.

journalist

(ˈdʒɜːnəlɪst)
n
1. (Professions) a person whose occupation is journalism
2. a person who keeps a journal

jour•nal•ist

(ˈdʒɜr nl ɪst)

n.
1. a person whose profession is journalism.
2. a person who keeps a journal.
[1685–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.journalist - a writer for newspapers and magazinesjournalist - a writer for newspapers and magazines
broadcast journalist - a journalist who broadcasts on radio or television
columnist, editorialist - a journalist who writes editorials
newspaperman, newspaperwoman, newswriter, pressman, correspondent - a journalist employed to provide news stories for newspapers or broadcast media
gazetteer - a journalist who writes for a gazette
photojournalist - a journalist who presents a story primarily through the use of photographs
penman, scribbler, scribe - informal terms for journalists
sob sister - a journalist who specializes in sentimental stories
sports writer, sportswriter - a journalist who writes about sports
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
2.journalist - someone who keeps a diary or journal
writer - a person who is able to write and has written something

journalist

noun reporter, writer, correspondent, newsman or newswoman, stringer, commentator, broadcaster, hack (derogatory), columnist, contributor, scribe (informal), pressman, journo (slang), newshound (informal), hackette (derogatory), newspaperman or newspaperwoman a freelance journalist with a special interest in the arts
Quotations
"Journalists say a thing that they know isn't true, in the hope that if they keep on saying it long enough it will be true" [Arnold Bennett The Title]
Translations
صَحَفي، صِحافيصَحَفِيٌّ
novinářžurnalista-ka
journalist
toimittajajournalistilehtimiesreportteri
novinarnovinarkadopisnicadopisnik
újságíró
blaîamaîur
ジャーナリスト
저널리스트
novinár
novinar
journalist
นักหนังสือพิมพ์
phóng viên

journalist

[ˈdʒɜːnəlɪst] Nperiodista mf, reportero/a m/f (LAm)

journalist

[ˈdʒɜːrnəlɪst] njournaliste mf
She's a journalist → Elle est journaliste.
She's a journalist for The Times → Elle est journaliste au Times.

journalist

nJournalist(in) m(f)

journalist

[ˈdʒɜːnəlɪst] ngiornalista m/f

journal

(ˈdʒəːnl) noun
1. a magazine or other regularly published paper (eg of a society). the British Medical Journal.
2. a diary giving an account of each day's activities.
ˈjournalism noun
the business of running, or writing for, newspapers or magazines.
ˈjournalist noun
a writer for a newspaper, magazine etc.
ˌjournaˈlistic adjective
(of style of writing) like that of a journalist, colourful and racy.

journalist

صَحَفِيٌّ žurnalista journalist Journalist δημοσιογράφος periodista toimittaja journaliste novinar giornalista ジャーナリスト 저널리스트 journalist journalist dziennikarz jornalista журналист journalist นักหนังสือพิมพ์ gazeteci phóng viên 新闻记者
References in classic literature ?
I shall try to do what I see lady journalists do, interviewing and writing descriptions and trying to remember conversations.
The idea that they are is due to our "realistic" journalists and critics of that day, always on the look out for Kostanzhoglos and Uncle Pyotr Ivanitchs and foolishly accepting them as our ideal; they have slandered our romantics, taking them for the same transcendental sort as in Germany or France.
I see; to your domestics you are `my lord,' the journalists style you `monsieur,' while your constituents call you
And it is only fair to state, with regard to modern journalists, that they always apologise to one in private for what they have written against one in public.
Never at any time have I been able to bear the flunkeyishness which one meets in the Press of the world at large, but more especially in that of Russia, where, almost every evening, journalists write on two subjects in particular namely, on the splendour and luxury of the casinos to be found in the Rhenish towns, and on the heaps of gold which are daily to be seen lying on their tables.
I don't intend this to be an affair for Parisian journalists to write paragraphs about.
Heavy-game shots liked to be in a position to cap the tales of their rivals, and journalists were not averse from sensational coups, even when imagination had to aid fact in the process.
And, unless the just anger of the Republic is at last going to electrocute journalists for writing like that, I don't quite see why it should interest you either.
The two men always met at the Century, or at some haunt of journalists and theatrical people, such as the restaurant where Winsett had proposed to go for a bock.
He returned to the Crystal Palace grounds, that classic starting-point of aeronautical adventure, about sunset, re-entered his shed without disaster, and had the doors locked immediately upon the photographers and journalists who been waiting his return.
Instead of men endowed with divine authority and directly guided by the will of God, modern history has given us either heroes endowed with extraordinary, superhuman capacities, or simply men of very various kinds, from monarchs to journalists, who lead the masses.
Six or seven years later we met again, when we had both become journalists, and had both had poems accepted by Mr.