journal

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Related to Journals: Medical journals

jour·nal

 (jûr′nəl)
n.
1.
a. A personal record of occurrences, experiences, and reflections kept on a regular basis; a diary.
b. An official record of daily proceedings, as of a legislative body.
c. Nautical A ship's log.
2. Accounting
a. A daybook.
b. A book of original entry in a double-entry system, listing all transactions and indicating the accounts to which they belong.
3. A newspaper.
4. A periodical presenting articles on a particular subject: a medical journal.
5. The part of a machine shaft or axle supported by a bearing.
v. jour·naled or jour·nalled, journaling, journals
v.intr.
To write one's observations or thoughts in a journal: spent all day journaling about the trip.

[Middle English, breviary, from Old French, daily, breviary, from Late Latin diurnālis, daily; see diurnal.]

journal

(ˈdʒɜːnəl)
n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a newspaper or periodical
2. a book in which a daily record of happenings, etc, is kept
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an official record of the proceedings of a legislative body
4. (Accounting & Book-keeping) accounting
a. Also called: Book of Original Entry one of several books in which transactions are initially recorded to facilitate subsequent entry in the ledger
b. another name for daybook
5. (Mechanical Engineering) the part of a shaft or axle in contact with or enclosed by a bearing
6. (Mechanical Engineering) a plain cylindrical bearing to support a shaft or axle
[C14: from Old French: daily, from Latin diurnālis; see diurnal]

jour•nal

(ˈdʒɜr nl)
n.
1. a daily record, as of occurrences, experiences, or observations.
2. a newspaper, esp. a daily one.
3. a periodical or magazine, esp. one published for a group, learned society, or profession.
4. a record, usu. daily, of the proceedings and transactions of a legislative body or an organization.
5. (in double-entry bookkeeping) a book into which all transactions are entered before being posted into the ledger.
6. a log or logbook.
7. the portion of a shaft or axle contained by a plain bearing.
v.t.
8. to enter in a journal.
[1325–75; Middle English < Old French journal daily (adj. and n.) < Late Latin diurnālis diurnal]

journal

A journal is a magazine that deals with a specialized subject. Many magazines have Journal as part of their name.

...the British Medical Journal.
All our results are published in scientific journals.

A journal is also a kind of diary in which you keep a record of events or progress.

My doctor told me to keep a journal of everything I ate.

Be Careful!
Don't refer to a newspaper as a 'journal'.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.journal - a daily written record of (usually personal) experiences and observationsjournal - a daily written record of (usually personal) experiences and observations
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
blog, web log - a shared on-line journal where people can post diary entries about their personal experiences and hobbies; "postings on a blog are usually in chronological order"
2.journal - a periodical dedicated to a particular subject; "he reads the medical journals"
periodical - a publication that appears at fixed intervals
annals - reports of the work of a society or learned body etc
3.journal - a ledger in which transactions have been recorded as they occurredjournal - a ledger in which transactions have been recorded as they occurred
account book, book of account, ledger, leger, book - a record in which commercial accounts are recorded; "they got a subpoena to examine our books"
4.journal - a record book as a physical object
book, volume - physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop"
daybook, ledger - an accounting journal as a physical object; "he bought a new daybook"
diary - a personal journal (as a physical object)
5.journal - the part of the axle contained by a bearing
axle - a shaft on which a wheel rotates

journal

noun
1. magazine, record, review, register, publication, bulletin, chronicle, gazette, periodical, zine (informal) All our results are published in scientific journals.
2. newspaper, paper, daily, weekly, monthly, tabloid He was a spokesperson for The New York Times and some other journals.
3. diary, record, history, log, notebook, chronicle, annals, yearbook, commonplace book, daybook On the plane he wrote in his journal.
Translations
مَجَلَّه ، جَريدَهمُذَكَّرَه، دَفْتَر يَوْمِيّات
deníkčasopis
dagbogtidsskrift
diaarierikoisaikakauslehtilokilokikirjapäiväkirja
dagbóktímarit
žurnalasžurnalistasžurnalistikažurnalistinis
dienasgrāmatažurnāls
dnevnikrevija
dergigünlükhatıra defterimecmua

journal

[ˈdʒɜːnl]
A. N
1. (= diary) → diario m (Naut) → diario m de navegación
2. (= periodical) → periódico m; (= magazine) → revista f
3. (Mech) → gorrón m, muñón m
B. CPD journal bearing Ncojinete m

journal

[ˈdʒɜːrnəl] n
(= magazine) → revue f
(= diary) → journal m
to keep a journal → tenir un journal
to keep a journal of sth (= record) → tenir un journal de qch

journal

n
(= magazine)Zeitschrift f; (= newspaper)Zeitung f
(= diary)Tagebuch nt; to keep a journalTagebuch führen
(Naut) → Logbuch nt, → Bordbuch nt; (Comm) → Journal nt; (= daybook)Tagebuch nt; (Jur) → Gerichtsakten pl
(of fax machine)Sendebericht m; (Mech) → Achszapfen m, → Achsschenkel m

journal

[ˈdʒɜːnl] n (periodical) → rivista (specializzata); (newspaper) → giornale m; (diary) → diario (Book-keeping) → brogliaccio

journal

(ˈdʒəːnl) noun
1. a magazine or other regularly published paper (eg of a society). the British Medical Journal.
2. a diary giving an account of each day's activities.
ˈjournalism noun
the business of running, or writing for, newspapers or magazines.
ˈjournalist noun
a writer for a newspaper, magazine etc.
ˌjournaˈlistic adjective
(of style of writing) like that of a journalist, colourful and racy.

journal

n. diario.
References in classic literature ?
Leaving the Expedition outside to rest, I quartered myself in the chalet, with Harris, proposing to correct my journals and scientific observations before continuing the ascent.
Jim said he would "jis' 's soon have tobacker in his coffee;" and found so much fault with it, and with the work and bother of raising the mullen, and jews-harping the rats, and petting and flattering up the snakes and spiders and things, on top of all the other work he had to do on pens, and in- scriptions, and journals, and things, which made it more trouble and worry and responsibility to be a prisoner than anything he ever undertook, that Tom most lost all patience with him; and said he was just loadened down with more gaudier chances than a prisoner ever had in the world to make a name for himself, and yet he didn't know enough to appreciate them, and they was just about wasted on him.
Louis when the murder was done, and got the news out of the morning journals, as was shown by his telegram to his aunt.
Hundreds of girls take fancies for disguising themselves; and hundreds of instances of it are related year after year in the public journals.
We must get his name published in as many journals as possible as a signatory to the great petition; it will draw on others as your name drew him.
A perusal of their journals, as well as the candid acknowledgments of such as have had a seat in that assembly, will inform us, that the members have but too frequently displayed the character, rather of partisans of their respective States, than of impartial guardians of a common interest; that where on one occasion improper sacrifices have been made of local considerations, to the aggrandizement of the federal government, the great interests of the nation have suffered on a hundred, from an undue attention to the local prejudices, interests, and views of the particular States.
Naseby told me in a note that he had sent his letter to three other journals, and in fact threatened me with what he called exposure if I kept it back from mine.
Then burst forth the unending argument between the believers and the unbelievers in the societies of the wise and the scientific journals.
They were to make the complete circuit of it, trapping on all the streams which should fall in their way, and to keep journals and make charts, calculated to impart a knowledge of the lake and the surrounding country.
Accounts like these are sometimes copied into English and American journals.
Among them were journals and letters narrating expeditions by sea, and journeys to and fro across the Rocky Mountains by routes before untravelled, together with documents illustrative of savage and colonial life on the borders of the Pacific.
He talked in a low, even voice, without gesture and without expression; and it was a history for which a dozen leading journals would cheerfully have paid many dollars - the story of forty years that was at the same time the story of the New West, whose story is yet to be written.

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