jubilant


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ju·bi·lant

 (jo͞o′bə-lənt)
adj.
1. Exultingly joyful.
2. Expressing joy.

[Latin iūbilāns, iūbilant-, present participle of iūbilāre, to raise a shout of joy.]

ju′bi·lance n.
ju′bi·lant·ly adv.

jubilant

(ˈdʒuːbɪlənt)
adj
feeling or expressing great joy
[C17: from Latin jūbilāns shouting for joy, from jūbilāre to give a joyful cry, from jūbilum a shout, wild cry]
ˈjubilance, ˈjubilancy n
ˈjubilantly adv

ju•bi•lant

(ˈdʒu bə lənt)

adj.
showing great joy, satisfaction, or triumph; exultant.
[1660–70; < Latin jūbilant-, s. of jūbilāns, present participle of jūbilāre to shout, whoop]
ju′bi•lance, n.
ju′bi•lant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.jubilant - joyful and proud especially because of triumph or successjubilant - joyful and proud especially because of triumph or success; "rejoicing crowds filled the streets on VJ Day"; "a triumphal success"; "a triumphant shout"
elated - exultantly proud and joyful; in high spirits; "the elated winner"; "felt elated and excited"
2.jubilant - full of high-spirited delight; "a joyful heart"
joyous - full of or characterized by joy; "felt a joyous abandon"; "joyous laughter"

jubilant

jubilant

adjective
Feeling or expressing an uplifting joy over a success or victory:
Translations
مُتَهَلِّل، مُبْتَهِج
jásající
jublende
örvendező
fagnandi
gavilējošs
sevinçten uçan

jubilant

[ˈdʒuːbɪlənt] ADJ [crowd] → jubiloso, exultante; [cry, shout] → de júbilo, alborozado

jubilant

[ˈdʒuːbɪlənt] adj
[supporters, crowds] → débordant(e) de joie, réjoui(e)
to be jubilant → jubiler
[scene, mood] → réjouissant(e)

jubilant

adjüberglücklich; (= expressing joy)jubelnd attr; voicejubelnd attr, → frohlockend attr; facestrahlend attr; (at sb’s failure etc) → triumphierend attr; they gave him a jubilant welcomesie empfingen ihn mit Jubel; to be jubilantüberglücklich sein, jubeln, strahlen, triumphieren

jubilant

[ˈdʒuːbɪlənt] adjgiubilante
to be jubilant → essere esultante

jubilant

(ˈdʒuːbilənt) adjective
showing and expressing triumphant joy. Jubilant crowds welcomed the victorious team home.
ˈjubilantly adverb
ˌjubiˈlation (-ˈlei-) noun
(sometimes in plural) (triumphant) rejoicing. There was great jubilation over the victory; The jubilations went on till midnight.
References in classic literature ?
they were everywhere; they swept back and forth across the river constantly, and their jubilant music was never stilled.
He lost two of his small nibs quickly, and Singer was jubilant, but the third time by some chance the Jumbo slipped round and Philip was able to push his J across it.
Anne heard it and thrilled to it; Gilbert heard it, and wondered only that all the birds in the world had not burst into jubilant song; Paul heard it and later wrote a lyric about it which was one of the most admired in his first volume of verse; Charlotta the Fourth heard it and was blissfully sure it meant good luck for her adored Miss Shirley.
A new strain of music, loud and jubilant, rose from the hidden shrine.
His friend, jubilant and glori- fied, holding his treasure with vanity, came to him there.
He discovered nothing; and she went home jubilant, and dropped all concern about the matter permanently out of her mind.
They were jubilant with vanity over their new grandeur and the illustrious trouble they were making.
I remember how jubilant Markham was at securing a new photograph of the planet for the illustrated paper he edited in those days.
He was the only man who was not out of his bunk, and he was jubilant in that he possessed no bruises to advertise that he had had a hand in the night's work.
Pollyanna's jubilant voice turned to one of distressed appeal.
Miss Wilson, who had been conferring with the housekeeper, cut his speech short by ordering him to carry his wife to bed, which he did with the assistance of Smilash, now jubilant.
While Sancho fared thus, Don Quixote was watching the entrance, at one end of the arcade, of some twelve peasants, all in holiday and gala dress, mounted on twelve beautiful mares with rich handsome field trappings and a number of little bells attached to their petrals, who, marshalled in regular order, ran not one but several courses over the meadow, with jubilant shouts and cries of "Long live Camacho and Quiteria