judging


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judge

 (jŭj)
v. judged, judg·ing, judg·es
v.tr.
1. To form an opinion or estimation of after careful consideration: judge heights; judging character.
2.
a. Law To hear and decide on in a court of law: judge a case.
b. To pass sentence on; condemn.
c. To act as one appointed to decide the winners of: judge an essay contest.
3. To determine or declare after consideration or deliberation: Most people judged him negligent in performing his duties as a parent.
4. Informal To have as an opinion or assumption; suppose: I judge you're right.
5. Bible To govern; rule. Used of an ancient Israelite leader.
v.intr.
1. To form an opinion or evaluation.
2. To act or decide as a judge.
n.
1. One who judges, especially:
a. One who makes estimates as to worth, quality, or fitness: a good judge of used cars; a poor judge of character.
b. Law A public official who hears and decides cases brought in court.
c. Law A public official who hears and decides cases or matters in a forum other than a court, such as an administrative proceeding.
d. One appointed to decide the winners of a contest or competition.
2. Bible
a. A leader of the Israelites during a period of about 400 years between the death of Joshua and the accession of Saul.
b. Judges(used with a sing. verb) See Table at Bible.

[Middle English jugen, from Anglo-Norman juger, from Latin iūdicāre, from iūdex, iūdic-, judge; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

judging

(ˈdʒʌdʒɪŋ)
n
(Law) law the work of a judge as practised in a court of law
adj
of or relating to the formal decision of one or more judges at a contest or competitioncritical or discerning
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.judging - the cognitive process of reaching a decision or drawing conclusionsjudging - the cognitive process of reaching a decision or drawing conclusions
deciding, decision making - the cognitive process of reaching a decision; "a good executive must be good at decision making"
prejudgement, prejudgment - a judgment reached before the evidence is available
Translations

judging

[ˈdʒʌdʒɪŋ] n (at competition, show)appréciation f
References in classic literature ?
For I agree, that "there is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers.
A seasoned and experienced all-breed judge and past Chariman of the Board of the American Kennel Club, Robert Berndt also draws upon his many years of experience as a dog handler in "Judging Dogs: Science And Technique", a superbly written and organized instruction manual for judging entrees of any and all breeds of dogs either in general or in specialized dog shows and competitions.
During the National Best of NAMA judging, February 17 in Kansas City, MO, 17 judges had the difficult task of picking the best of 502 entries.
Titled "Asking the gatekeepers: A national survey of judges on judging expert evidence in a post-Daubert world," it found that judges who had applied Daubert standards to evidence "had little understanding of the key concept of hypothesis testing or of the significance of error rates," Berger says.
Entries will be reviewed by the six-member expert judging panel, which includes a mix of new and returning judges specializing in the fields of engineering, construction, design, and marketing.
God loves sinners, we were told, and we should all assist the president (so argued an ethics professor and pastor I debated) in his "quest for maturity" by not judging his behavior.
If your entry makes it through divisional and regional judging and reaches the second stage of judging, the Blue Ribbon Panel, your final judge and jury is a two-person appraisal team.
That's the plan behind the International Figure Skating Union's proposed radically new method of judging figure skating announced on Monday.
Unless the share of the populace with the attributes necessary for good judging has risen equally, or the relative attractions of the field have increased, the system must be relying on an increasing proportion of ill-suited people.
Diversifying the judging pool, while challenging tournament directors, will improve the educational value of forensics.
The judging is conducted by a rotating panel of independent, professional and accredited chefs who follow a rigorous and unbiased process in ACI's state-of-the art judging facility in San Francisco.