judicial


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Related to judicial: judicial activism

ju·di·cial

 (jo͞o-dĭsh′əl)
adj.
1. Law
a. Of, relating to, or proper to courts of law or to the administration of justice: the judicial system.
b. Decreed by or proceeding from a court of justice: a judicial decision.
c. Belonging or appropriate to the office of a judge: in judicial robes.
2. Characterized by or expressing judgment: the judicial function of a literary critic.
3. Proceeding from a divine judgment.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin iūdiciālis, from iūdicium, judgment, from iūdex, iūdic-, judge; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

ju·di′cial·ly adv.

judicial

(dʒuːˈdɪʃəl)
adj
1. (Law) of or relating to the administration of justice
2. (Law) of or relating to judgment in a court of law or to a judge exercising this function
3. inclined to pass judgment; discriminating
4. (Law) allowed or enforced by a court of law: a decree of judicial separation.
5. (Law) having qualities appropriate to a judge
6. (Law) giving or seeking judgment, esp determining or seeking determination of a contested issue
[C14: from Latin jūdiciālis belonging to the law courts, from jūdicium judgment, from jūdex a judge]
juˈdicially adv

ju•di•cial

(dʒuˈdɪʃ əl)

adj.
1. pertaining to judgment in courts of justice or to the administration of justice: judicial proceedings.
2. pertaining to courts of law or to judges; judiciary: judicial functions.
3. proper to the character of a judge, esp. fair and impartial.
4. inclined to make or give judgments; critical; discriminating.
5. decreed, sanctioned, or enforced by a court: a judicial decision.
6. giving or seeking judgment, as in a dispute or contest.
7. inflicted by God as a judgment.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin jūdiciālis of the law courts =jūdici(um) judgment (see judge, -ium1) + -ālis -al1]
ju•di′cial•ly, adv.

judicial

Belonging to, appropriate to, or characteristic of a court or the administration of justice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.judicial - decreed by or proceeding from a court of justice; "a judicial decision"
legal - established by or founded upon law or official or accepted rules
2.judicial - belonging or appropriate to the office of a judge; "judicial robes"
3.judicial - relating to the administration of justice or the function of a judge; "judicial system"
4.judicial - expressing careful judgment; "discriminative censure"; "a biography ...appreciative and yet judicial in purpose"-Tyler Dennett
critical - characterized by careful evaluation and judgment; "a critical reading"; "a critical dissertation"; "a critical analysis of Melville's writings"

judicial

adjective legal, official, judiciary, juridical an independent judicial inquiry
Translations
قَضائي
soudní
retslig
bíróibírósági
dómara-, laga-
teisėjųteisministeismo keliu
tiesas-
adlîhukukî

judicial

[dʒuːˈdɪʃəl] ADJ
1. [decision, proceedings] → judicial; [separation] → legal
judicial inquiryinvestigación f judicial
2. [mind, faculty] → crítico

judicial

[dʒuːˈdɪʃəl] adj [procedure, process] → judiciairejudicial inquiry nenquête f judiciaire

judicial

adj
(Jur) inquiry, reviewgerichtlich; powerrichterlich; judicial functionRichteramt nt; to take judicial proceedings against somebodyein Gerichtsverfahren ntgegen jdn anstrengen or einleiten; judicial systemJustizsystem nt
(= critical) mindklar urteilend attr, → kritisch

judicial

[dʒuːˈdɪʃl] adj
a. (enquiry, decision) → giudiziario/a
to bring judicial proceedings against sb → procedere per vie legali contro qn
b. (mind, faculty) → critico/a

judicial

(dʒuˈdiʃəl) adjective
of a judge or court of law. judicial powers; He might bring judicial proceedings against you.
juˈdicially adverb
References in classic literature ?
Grandfather smoothed his beard and looked judicial.
If any one part of their proceedings can be said to deserve less blame than another, it was the singular indiscrimination with which they persecuted, not merely the poor and aged, as in former judicial massacres, but people of all ranks; their own equals, brethren, and wives.
For years past she had looked from this estranged point of view at human institutions, and whatever priests or legislators had established; criticising all with hardly more reverence than the Indian would feel for the clerical band, the judicial robe, the pillory, the gallows, the fireside, or the church.
And above it all the great man sat and beamed a majestic judicial smile upon all the house, and warmed himself in the sun of his own grandeur -- for he was "showing off," too.
DOUGLASS states that in neither of these instances was any thing done by way of legal arrest or judicial investigation.
said old Mazey, wagging his venerable head with judicial severity.
Micawber possesses what I have heard my papa call, when I lived at home, the judicial mind; and I hope Mr.
Though mind you, Pip," said Joe, with a judicial touch or two of the poker on the top bar, "rendering unto all their doo, and maintaining equal justice betwixt man and man, my father were that good in his hart, don't you see?
No, no I instantly formed the purpose of assisting at some good work, such as the burning of a witch, a judicial combat, or the like matter of godly service, and therefore am I here.
Most of them, and especially those who deal in the astronomical part, have great faith in judicial astrology, although they are ashamed to own it publicly.
A constitution for the people, and the distribution of legislative, executive, and judicial powers was prepared.
Don Quixote and Sancho were left alone, and the moment Samson took his departure, Rocinante began to neigh, and Dapple to sigh, which, by both knight and squire, was accepted as a good sign and a very happy omen; though, if the truth is to be told, the sighs and brays of Dapple were louder than the neighings of the hack, from which Sancho inferred that his good fortune was to exceed and overtop that of his master, building, perhaps, upon some judicial astrology that he may have known, though the history says nothing about it; all that can be said is, that when he stumbled or fell, he was heard to say he wished he had not come out, for by stumbling or falling there was nothing to be got but a damaged shoe or a broken rib; and, fool as he was, he was not much astray in this.