juke


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juke 1

also jook  (jo͞ok, jo͝ok)Southeastern US
n.
A roadside or rural establishment offering liquor, dancing, and often gambling and prostitution. Also called juke house, juke joint.
intr.v. juked, juk·ing, jukes also jooked or jook·ing or jooks
1. To play dance music, especially in a juke.
2. To dance, especially in a juke or to the music of a jukebox.

[Probably from Gullah juke, joog, disorderly, wicked, of West African origin; akin to Wolof dzug, to live wickedly, and Bambara dzugu, wicked.]
Word History: Gullah, the English-based Creole language spoken by people of African ancestry off the coast of Georgia and South Carolina, retains a number of words from the West African languages brought over by slaves. One such word is juke, "bad, wicked, disorderly," the probable source of the English word juke. Used originally in Florida and then chiefly in the Southeastern states, juke (also appearing in the compound juke joint) was an African-American word meaning a roadside drinking establishment that offers cheap drinks, food, and music for dancing and often doubles as a brothel. "To juke" is to dance, particularly at a juke joint or to the music of a jukebox whose name, no longer regional and having lost the connotation of sleaziness, contains the same word.

juke 2

 (jo͞ok) Football
v. juked, juk·ing, jukes
v.tr.
To deceive or outmaneuver (a defending opponent) by a feint; fake.
v.intr.
To deceive or outmaneuver a defender by a feint.
n.
A feint or fake.

[Middle English jowken, to bend in a supple way.]

juke

(dʒuːk)
n
a small roadside establishment that plays music and provides refreshments

juke

(dʒuk)

v. juked, juk•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to make a move intended to deceive (an opponent) in football.
n.
2. a fake or feint usu. intended to deceive a defensive player.
[1425–75; orig. Scots jowk, late Middle English, probably alter. of Scots dook duck2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.juke - a small roadside establishment in the southeastern United States where you can eat and drink and dance to music provided by a jukeboxjuke - a small roadside establishment in the southeastern United States where you can eat and drink and dance to music provided by a jukebox
joint - a disreputable place of entertainment
2.juke - (football) a deceptive move made by a football player
feint - any distracting or deceptive maneuver (as a mock attack)
football, football game - any of various games played with a ball (round or oval) in which two teams try to kick or carry or propel the ball into each other's goal
References in classic literature ?
Here is Bill Jukes, every inch of him tattooed, the same Bill Jukes who got six dozen on the WALRUS from Flint before he would drop the bag of moidores [Portuguese gold pieces]; and Cookson, said to be Black Murphy's brother (but this was never proved), and Gentleman Starkey, once an usher in a public school and still dainty in his ways of killing; and Skylights (Morgan's Skylights); and the Irish bo'sun Smee, an oddly genial man who stabbed, so to speak, without offence, and was the only Non-conformist in Hook's crew; and Noodler, whose hands were fixed on backwards; and Robt.
Young Jukes, the chief mate, attending his commander to the gangway, would sometimes venture to say, with the greatest gentleness, "Allow me, sir" -- and possessing himself of the umbrella deferentially, would elevate the ferule, shake the folds, twirl a neat furl in a jiffy, and hand it back; going through the performance with a face of such portentous gravity, that Mr.
Jukes, in moments of expansion on shore, would proclaim loudly that the "old girl was as good as she was pretty.
At the news of the contemplated transfer Jukes grew restless, as if under a sense of personal affront.
The first morning the new flag floated over the stern of the Nan-Shan Jukes stood looking at it bitterly from the bridge.
Well, it looks queer to me," burst out Jukes, greatly exasperated, and flung off the bridge.
When next Jukes, who was carrying on the duty that day with a sort of suppressed fierceness, happened on the bridge, his commander observed:
mumbled Jukes, falling on his knees before a deck-locker and jerking therefrom viciously a spare lead-line.
Well, sir," began Jukes, getting up excitedly, "all I can say --" He fumbled for the end of the coil of line with trembling hands.
yelled Jukes, so that every head on the Nan-Shan's decks looked towards the bridge.
He smiled from on high at Jukes, and went on smoking and glancing about quietly, in the manner of a kind uncle lending an ear to the tale of an excited schoolboy.
No," cried Jukes, raising a weary, discouraged voice above the harsh buzz of the Nan-Shan's friction winches.