jump


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

jump

 (jŭmp)
v. jumped, jump·ing, jumps
v.intr.
1.
a. To propel oneself upward or over a distance in single quick motion or series of such motions.
b. To move suddenly and in one motion: jumped out of bed.
c. To move involuntarily, as in surprise: jumped when the phone rang.
d. To parachute from an aircraft.
2.
a. Informal To act quickly; hustle: Jump when I give you an order.
b. To take prompt advantage; respond quickly: jump at a bargain.
3.
a. To enter eagerly into an activity; plunge: jumped into the race for the nomination.
b. To begin or start. Often used with off: The project jumped off with great enthusiasm.
4. To form an opinion or judgment hastily: jump to conclusions.
5. To make a sudden verbal attack; lash out: jumped at me for being late.
6.
a. To undergo a sudden and pronounced increase: Prices jumped in October.
b. To rise suddenly in position or rank: jumped over two others with more seniority.
7. To change discontinuously or after a short period: jumps from one subject to another; jumped from one job to another.
8.
a. To be displaced by a sudden jerk: The phonograph needle jumped.
b. To be displaced vertically or laterally because of improper alignment: The film jumped during projection.
9. Computers To move from one set of instructions in a program to another out of sequence.
10. Games
a. To move over an opponent's playing piece in a board game.
b. To make a jump bid in bridge.
11. Slang To be lively; bustle: a disco that really jumps.
v.tr.
1. To leap over or across: jump a fence.
2. To leap onto: jump a bus.
3. Slang To spring upon in sudden attack; assault or ambush: Muggers jumped him in the park.
4. To move or start prematurely before: jumped the starting signal.
5. To cause to leap: jump a horse over a fence.
6. To cause to increase suddenly: shortages that jumped milk prices by several cents.
7. To pass over; skip: The typewriter jumped a space.
8. To raise in rank or position; promote.
9. Games
a. To move a piece over (an opponent's piece) in a board game, often thereby capturing the opponent's piece.
b. To raise (a partner's bid) in bridge by more than is necessary.
10. To jump-start (a motor vehicle).
11. To leave (a course), especially through mishap: The train jumped the rails.
12. Slang
a. To leave hastily; skip: jumped town a step ahead of the police.
b. To leave (an organization, for example) suddenly or in violation of an agreement: jumped the team and signed with a rival club.
13. To seize or occupy illegally: jump a mining claim.
14. Vulgar Slang To have sexual intercourse with.
n.
1.
a. The act of jumping; a leap.
b. The distance covered by a jump: a jump of seven feet.
c. An obstacle or span to be jumped.
d. A structure or course from which a jump is made: built a jump out of snow.
2. A descent from an aircraft by parachute.
3. Sports Any of several track-and-field events in which contestants jump.
4. Informal
a. An initial competitive advantage; a head start: got the jump on the other newspapers.
b. Energy or quickness: "We got off to a slow start. We didn't have any jump, and when we did get things going, we were too far behind" (John LeClair).
5.
a. A sudden pronounced rise, as in price or salary.
b. An impressive promotion.
6. A step or level: managed to stay a jump ahead.
7. A sudden or major transition, as from one career or subject to another.
8.
a. A short trip.
b. One in a series of moves and stopovers, as with a circus or road show.
9. Games A move in a board game over an opponent's piece.
10. Computers A movement from one set of instructions to another.
11.
a. An involuntary nervous movement; a start.
b. jumps A condition of nervousness. Often used with the.
12. A jump-start of a motor vehicle.
13. Vulgar Slang An act of sexual intercourse.
Phrasal Verb:
jump out
To be readily noticed: The misspellings jumped out at me.
Idioms:
jump bail
To fail to appear in court after having been released on bail.
jump (someone's) bones Vulgar Slang
To have sexual intercourse with someone.
jump the gun
To start doing something too soon.
jump the shark
To undergo a sustained decline in quality or popularity.
jump through hoops
To make extraordinary efforts, especially in following a prescribed procedure.

[Early Modern English, perhaps imitative of the sound of feet hitting with the ground after jumping. Idiom, jump the shark, after a 1977 episode of the television series Happy Days in which the character Arthur "the Fonz" Fonzarelli makes a show of bravery by jumping over a shark while on water skis (considered as an improbable and absurd plot incident marking the moment at which the series began to decline).]

jump

(dʒʌmp)
vb
1. (intr) to leap or spring clear of the ground or other surface by using the muscles in the legs and feet
2. (tr) to leap over or clear (an obstacle): to jump a gap.
3. (tr) to cause to leap over an obstacle: to jump a horse over a hedge.
4. (intr) to move or proceed hastily (into, onto, out of, etc): she jumped into a taxi and was off.
5. (tr) informal to board so as to travel illegally on: he jumped the train as it was leaving.
6. (intr) to parachute from an aircraft
7. (intr) to jerk or start, as with astonishment, surprise, etc: she jumped when she heard the explosion.
8. to rise or cause to rise suddenly or abruptly
9. to pass or skip over (intervening objects or matter): she jumped a few lines and then continued reading.
10. (intr) to change from one thing to another, esp from one subject to another
11. (General Engineering) (tr) to drill by means of a jumper
12. (Film) (intr) (of a film)
a. to have sections of a continuous sequence omitted, as through faulty cutting
b. to flicker, as through faulty alignment of the film
13. (Military) (tr) US to promote in rank, esp unexpectedly or to a higher rank than expected
14. (Automotive Engineering) (tr) to start (a car) using jump leads
15. (Chess & Draughts) draughts to capture (an opponent's piece) by moving one of one's own pieces over it to an unoccupied square
16. (Bridge) (intr) bridge to bid in response to one's partner at a higher level than is necessary, to indicate a strong hand
17. (tr) to come off (a track, rail, etc): the locomotive jumped the rails.
18. (intr) (of the stylus of a record player) to be jerked out of the groove
19. (intr) slang to be lively: the party was jumping when I arrived.
20. (tr) informal to attack without warning: thieves jumped the old man as he walked through the park.
21. (tr) informal (of a driver or a motor vehicle) to pass through (a red traffic light) or move away from (traffic lights) before they change to green
22. (tr) slang Brit (of a man) to have sexual intercourse with
23. (Law) jump bail to forfeit one's bail by failing to appear in court, esp by absconding
24. jump down someone's throat informal to address or reply to someone with unexpected sharpness
25. jump ship to desert, esp to leave a ship in which one is legally bound to serve
26. jump the queue See queue-jump
27. jump to it informal to begin something quickly and efficiently
n
28. an act or instance of jumping
29. a space, distance, or obstacle to be jumped or that has been jumped
30. a descent by parachute from an aircraft
31. (Athletics (Track & Field)) sport any of several contests involving a jump: the high jump.
32. a sudden rise: the jump in prices last month.
33. a sudden or abrupt transition
34. a sudden jerk or involuntary muscular spasm, esp as a reaction of surprise
35. a step or degree: one jump ahead.
36. (Chess & Draughts) draughts a move that captures an opponent's piece by jumping over it
37. (Film) films
a. a break in continuity in the normal sequence of shots
b. (as modifier): a jump cut.
38. (Computer Science) computing another name for branch7
39. slang Brit an act of sexual intercourse
40. on the jump informal chiefly
a. in a hurry
b. busy and energetic
41. take a running jump informal Brit a contemptuous expression of dismissal
[C16: probably of imitative origin; compare Swedish gumpa to jump]
ˈjumpable adj
ˈjumpingly adv

jump

(dʒʌmp)
v.i.
1. to spring clear of the ground or other support by a sudden muscular effort; leap.
2. to move suddenly or quickly: to jump out of bed.
3. to move or jerk involuntarily, as from shock: I jumped when the firecracker exploded.
4. to obey or respond quickly and energetically: The waiter was told to jump when the captain signaled.
5. Informal. to be full of activity; bustle: The town is jumping with excitement.
6. to rise suddenly in amount: Prices jumped this quarter.
7. to proceed abruptly, ignoring intervening steps or deliberation: to jump to a conclusion.
8. to move haphazardly, aimlessly, abruptly, or after a short period: to jump from one job to another.
9. to omit letters, numbers, etc.; skip: This typewriter jumps.
10. to parachute from an airplane.
11. to take eagerly; seize (often fol. by at): We jumped at the offer.
12. to enter into something with vigor (usu. fol. by in or into): She jumped right into the discussion.
13. to advance rapidly or abruptly, esp. in rank: to jump from clerk to manager in six months.
14. to start a campaign, military attack, etc. (usu. fol. by off).
15. (in checkers) to move from one side of an opponent's piece to a vacant square on the opposite side, thus capturing the piece.
16. to make a jump bid in bridge.
17. (of newspaper copy) to continue on a subsequent page, following intervening copy.
v.t.
18. to leap or spring over: to jump a stream.
19. to cause to leap: to jump a horse over a fence.
20. to skip or pass over; bypass.
21. to elevate, esp. in rank, by causing to skip or pass rapidly through intermediate stages.
22. to move past or start before (a signal); anticipate: The car jumped the red light.
23. to increase sharply.
24. to capture (an opponent's piece in checkers) by leaping over.
25. to attack or pounce upon without warning, as from ambush: The gang jumped him in a dark alley.
26. to raise (the bid in bridge) by more than necessary to reach the next bidding level.
27. to abscond or flee from; skip: to jump town.
28. (of trains, trolleys, etc.) to spring off or leave (the track).
29. to get on board hastily: He jumped a plane for Chicago.
30. to seize or occupy illegally or forcibly (a mining claim or the like).
31. to continue (a newspaper story) from one page to another over intervening copy.
32. to connect (a dead battery) to a live battery by attaching booster cables between the respective terminals.
33. jump on, to berate suddenly and severely.
n.
34. an act or instance of jumping; leap.
35. a space, obstacle, or apparatus that is cleared or to be cleared in a leap.
36. a short or hurried journey.
37. a descent by parachute from an airplane.
38. a sudden rise in amount, price, etc.
39. a sudden upward or other movement of an inanimate object.
40. an abrupt transition from one point or thing to another, with omission of what intervenes.
41. a move or one of a series of moves: to stay one jump ahead of the police.
42. an athletic contest that features a leap or jump. Compare high jump, long jump.
43. a sudden start as from nervous excitement.
44. the act of taking an opponent's piece in checkers by leaping over it to an unoccupied square.
45. the jumps, nervousness.
adv. Idioms:
1. get or have the jump on, to have an initial advantage over.
2. jump ship, to escape from or desert a ship.
[1505–15; of expressive orig.; compare Dan gumpe to jolt, gimpe to move up and down, Swedish gumpa, Low German gumpen to jump]
jump′a•ble, adj.
jump′ing•ly, adv.

jump


Past participle: jumped
Gerund: jumping

Imperative
jump
jump
Present
I jump
you jump
he/she/it jumps
we jump
you jump
they jump
Preterite
I jumped
you jumped
he/she/it jumped
we jumped
you jumped
they jumped
Present Continuous
I am jumping
you are jumping
he/she/it is jumping
we are jumping
you are jumping
they are jumping
Present Perfect
I have jumped
you have jumped
he/she/it has jumped
we have jumped
you have jumped
they have jumped
Past Continuous
I was jumping
you were jumping
he/she/it was jumping
we were jumping
you were jumping
they were jumping
Past Perfect
I had jumped
you had jumped
he/she/it had jumped
we had jumped
you had jumped
they had jumped
Future
I will jump
you will jump
he/she/it will jump
we will jump
you will jump
they will jump
Future Perfect
I will have jumped
you will have jumped
he/she/it will have jumped
we will have jumped
you will have jumped
they will have jumped
Future Continuous
I will be jumping
you will be jumping
he/she/it will be jumping
we will be jumping
you will be jumping
they will be jumping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been jumping
you have been jumping
he/she/it has been jumping
we have been jumping
you have been jumping
they have been jumping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been jumping
you will have been jumping
he/she/it will have been jumping
we will have been jumping
you will have been jumping
they will have been jumping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been jumping
you had been jumping
he/she/it had been jumping
we had been jumping
you had been jumping
they had been jumping
Conditional
I would jump
you would jump
he/she/it would jump
we would jump
you would jump
they would jump
Past Conditional
I would have jumped
you would have jumped
he/she/it would have jumped
we would have jumped
you would have jumped
they would have jumped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jump - a sudden and decisive increase; "a jump in attendance"
increase - a change resulting in an increase; "the increase is scheduled for next month"
quantum leap, quantum jump - a sudden large increase or advance; "this may not insure success but it will represent a quantum leap from last summer"
2.jump - an abrupt transition; "a successful leap from college to the major leagues"
transition - a change from one place or state or subject or stage to another
quantum jump - (physics) an abrupt transition of an electron or atom or molecule from one quantum state to another with the emission or absorption of a quantum
3.jump - (film) an abrupt transition from one scene to another
transition - a passage that connects a topic to one that follows
4.jump - a sudden involuntary movement; "he awoke with a start"
startle reaction, startle response - a complicated involuntary reaction to a sudden unexpected stimulus (especially a loud noise); involves flexion of most skeletal muscles and a variety of visceral reactions
Moro reflex, startle reflex - a normal reflex of young infants; a sudden loud noise causes the child to stretch out the arms and flex the legs
flinch, wince - a reflex response to sudden pain
5.jump - descent with a parachutejump - descent with a parachute; "he had done a lot of parachuting in the army"
skydiving - performing acrobatics in free fall before pulling the ripcord of a parachute
descent - the act of changing your location in a downward direction
6.jump - the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground; "he advanced in a series of jumps"; "the jumping was unexpected"
actuation, propulsion - the act of propelling
header - a headlong jump (or fall); "he took a header into the shrubbery"
hop - the act of hopping; jumping upward or forward (especially on one foot)
leap, leaping, bounce, bound, saltation, spring - a light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwards
hurdle, vault - the act of jumping over an obstacle
jumping up and down - jumping in one spot (as in excitement); "the wailing and jumping up and down exhausted him"
capriole - (dressage) a vertical jump of a trained horse with a kick of the hind legs at the top of the jump
Verb1.jump - move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
pronk - jump straight up; "kangaroos pronk"
bounce, rebound, ricochet, take a hop, resile, spring, recoil, bound, reverberate - spring back; spring away from an impact; "The rubber ball bounced"; "These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide"
burst - move suddenly, energetically, or violently; "He burst out of the house into the cool night"
bounce - leap suddenly; "He bounced to his feet"
capriole - perform a capriole, of horses in dressage
galumph - move around heavily and clumsily; "the giant tortoises galumphed around in their pen"
ski jump - jump on skis
saltate - leap or skip, often in dancing; "These fish swim with a saltating motion"
vault - bound vigorously
leapfrog - jump across; "He leapfrogged his classmates"
vault, overleap - jump across or leap over (an obstacle)
curvet - perform a leap where both hind legs come off the ground, of a horse
hop, hop-skip, skip - jump lightly
caper - jump about playfully
hop - make a jump forward or upward
bestride, climb on, hop on, jump on, mount up, get on, mount - get up on the back of; "mount a horse"
2.jump - move or jump suddenly, as if in surprise or alarm; "She startled when I walked into the room"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
shy - start suddenly, as from fright
boggle - startle with amazement or fear
rear back - start with anger or resentment or in protest
jackrabbit - go forward or start with a fast, sudden movement
3.jump - make a sudden physical attack on; "The muggers jumped the woman in the fur coat"
assail, assault, set on, attack - attack someone physically or emotionally; "The mugger assaulted the woman"; "Nightmares assailed him regularly"
4.jump - increase suddenly and significantly; "Prices jumped overnight"
mount, wax, climb, rise - go up or advance; "Sales were climbing after prices were lowered"
5.jump - be highly noticeable
appear, seem, look - give a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect; "She seems to be sleeping"; "This appears to be a very difficult problem"; "This project looks fishy"; "They appeared like people who had not eaten or slept for a long time"
6.jump - enter eagerly into; "He jumped into the game"
enter, participate - become a participant; be involved in; "enter a race"; "enter an agreement"; "enter a drug treatment program"; "enter negotiations"
7.jump - rise in rank or status; "Her new novel jumped high on the bestseller list"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
8.jump - jump down from an elevated point; "the parachutist didn't want to jump"; "every year, hundreds of people jump off the Golden Gate bridge"; "the widow leapt into the funeral pyre"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
9.jump - run off or leave the rails; "the train derailed because a cow was standing on the tracks"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
10.jump - jump from an airplane and descend with a parachute
dive, plunge, plunk - drop steeply; "the stock market plunged"
sky dive, skydive - jump from an airplane and perform various maneuvers before opening one's parachute
11.jump - cause to jump or leap; "the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop"
12.jump - start (a car engine whose battery is dead) by connecting it to another car's battery
start up, start - get going or set in motion; "We simply could not start the engine"; "start up the computer"
13.jump - bypass; "He skipped a row in the text and so the sentence was incomprehensible"
neglect, omit, leave out, pretermit, overleap, overlook, miss, drop - leave undone or leave out; "How could I miss that typo?"; "The workers on the conveyor belt miss one out of ten"
14.jump - pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion"; "jump from one thing to another"
switch, change, shift - lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; "switch to a different brand of beer"; "She switched psychiatrists"; "The car changed lanes"
15.jump - go back and forth; swing back and forth between two states or conditions
vary, alter, change - become different in some particular way, without permanently losing one's or its former characteristics or essence; "her mood changes in accordance with the weather"; "The supermarket's selection of vegetables varies according to the season"

jump

verb
1. leap, dance, spring, bound, bounce, hop, skip, caper, prance, gambol stamping their boots and jumping up and down to knock the snow off
2. vault, clear, hurdle, go over, sail over, hop over He jumped the first fence beautifully.
3. spring, bound, leap, bounce She jumped to her feet and ran downstairs.
4. recoil, start, jolt, flinch, shake, jerk, quake, shudder, twitch, wince The phone shrilled, making her jump.
5. increase, rise, climb, escalate, gain, advance, boost, mount, soar, surge, spiral, hike, ascend The number of crimes jumped by ten per cent last year.
6. miss, avoid, skip, omit, evade, digress He refused to jump the queue for treatment at the local hospital.
7. attack, assault, assail, set upon, charge, strike (at), rush, storm, fall upon, lay into (informal) Two guys jumped me with clubs in the car park.
noun
1. leap, spring, skip, bound, buck, hop, vault, caper With a few hops and a jump they launched themselves into the air.
2. rise, increase, escalation, upswing, advance, boost, elevation, upsurge, upturn, increment, augmentation an eleven per cent jump in profits
3. jolt, start, movement, shock, shake, jar, jerk, lurch, twitch, swerve, spasm When Spider tapped on a window, Miguel gave an involuntary jump.
4. hurdle, gate, barrier, fence, obstacle, barricade, rail Hurdlers need to have unnaturally over-flexible knees to clear the jump.
jump at something seize on, grab, snatch, snap up, pounce on They would jump at the chance to become part owners of the corporation.
jump in dive in, leap in, plunge in, swoop in, plummet in The government had to jump in and purchase millions of dollars' worth of supplies.
jump out of your skin be scared, be afraid, be frightened, be nervous, be alarmed, be intimidated, be fearful, be timid He jumped out of his skin when he saw two rats.
jump the gun act with haste, be over-hasty, act too soon, act prematurely Some booksellers have jumped the gun and decided to sell it early.

jump

verb
1. To move off the ground by a muscular effort of the legs and feet:
2. To move in a lively way:
3. To move suddenly and involuntarily:
4. To catapult oneself from a disabled aircraft:
5. To increase in amount:
boost, hike, jack (up), raise, up.
6. To raise in rank:
noun
1. The act of jumping:
2. A sudden lively movement:
3. A sudden and involuntary movement:
4. Informal. A dominating position, as in a conflict:
Informal: inside track.
6. The amount by which something is increased:
7. A progression upward in rank:
8. A state of nervous restlessness or agitation.Used in plural:
fidget (often used in plural), jitter (used in plural), shiver (used in plural), tremble (often used in plural).
Informal: all-overs, shake (used in plural).
Translations
إرْتِفاع مُفاجئحاجِزحَرَكَه مُفاجِئَهقفزقَفْز
skočitskokvyskočenívyskočitnáhlý vzestup
hoppespringspringehopstigning
hypätähyppyetuillahätkähtää
skočiti
átugratfelugrikhirtelen emelkedésmegriadösszerezzent
hástökk; langstökkhindrunhoppahrökkva viîskyndileg hækkun
跳びはねる
뛰다
daryti skubotas išvadaseiti be eilėsįšoktikrūpčiojantispašokti
barjeraielēktlēcienslēkātlēkšana
náhly vzostupprinútiť skákaťvyskočenie
skočitiskokposkočitiposkok
hoppa
กระโดด
atlamakengelfırlamakhoplamahoplatmak
nhảy

jump

[dʒʌmp]
A. N
1. (Sport, Parachuting) → salto m; (= leap) → salto m, brinco m
what a great jump!¡qué gran salto!
it was a three metre jump to the other sidehabía que saltar tres metros para pasar al otro lado
high jumpsalto m de altura
long jumpsalto m de longitud
in or at one jumpde un salto, de un brinco
see also running D
2. (= start) she gave an involuntary jumpse sobresaltó sin querer
my heart gave a jumpme dio un vuelco el corazón
3. (= fence, obstacle) → obstáculo m
4. (fig) (= step) → salto m
in one jump he went from novice to masterde un salto or golpe pasó de novicio a maestro
Taiwan made the jump from poverty to wealth in a single generationTaiwán pasó de golpe or dio el salto de la pobreza a la riqueza en una sola generación
to be one jump ahead (of sb)llevar ventaja or la delantera (a algn)
try to keep one jump ahead of the competitionintenta llevarle ventaja or la delantera a la competencia
to keep one jump ahead of the packmantenerse a la cabeza del pelotón
to get a or the jump on sbadelantarse a algn
5. (= increase) → aumento m, subida f
there has been a jump in prices/unemploymentse ha producido un aumento or una subida de precios/del número de parados
B. VI
1. (= leap) (gen) → saltar; (from aeroplane) → lanzarse, tirarse
how far can you jump?¿hasta qué distancia puedes saltar?
how high can you jump?¿hasta qué altura puedes saltar?
did he jump or was he pushed? (lit) → ¿saltó o lo empujaron?, ¿se tiró o lo empujaron? (fig) → ¿se fue o lo echaron?
to jump across a streamcruzar un arroyo de un salto, saltar por encima de un arroyo
he jumped back in horrorde un salto retrocedió horrorizado
she jumped into the riverse tiró al río
to jump into bedmeterse en la cama de un salto
there were plenty of men ready to jump into bed with me (fig) → había muchos hombres dispuestos a acostarse conmigo
to jump for joysaltar de alegría
to jump off a bus/trainbajar de un autobús/tren de un salto
to jump on a bus/trainsubir a un autobús/tren de un salto
he jumped out of a third floor windowsaltó or se tiró desde una ventana del tercer piso
to jump out of bedsaltar de la cama
he jumped over the fencesaltó (por encima de) la valla
he jumped to his feetse puso de pie de un salto
jump to it!¡venga, muévete!, ¡rápido!, ¡apúrate! (LAm)
to jump upponerse de pie de un salto
I jumped up and down to keep warmme puse a dar saltos para que no me entrara frío
2. (= start) → sobresaltarse
he jumped at the sound of her voicese sobresaltó al oír su voz
to make sb jumpdar un susto a algn, sobresaltar a algn
you made me jump!¡qué susto me diste!
see also skin
3. (fig) (with prep, adv)
to jump at sthno dejar escapar algo
they offered me a really good salary and thought I'd jump at itme ofrecieron un sueldo buenísimo y creyeron que no lo dejaría escapar
he'd jump at the chance to get out of the officesi tuviera la oportunidad de irse de la oficina no la dejaría escapar
then the film jumps forward 20 yearsluego la película da un salto adelante de 20 años
to jump from one subject to anothersaltar de un tema a otro
he jumps on everything I sayle pone faltas a todo lo que digo
see also bandwagon, conclusion, throat
4. (= increase) [sales, profits] → subir, aumentar; [shares] → subir
C. VT
1. (lit) (also jump over) [+ ditch, fence] → saltar (por encima de); (in draughts, chess) → comerse
2. [+ horse] (= cause to jump) → hacer saltar; (= enter in competition) → presentar; (= ride) → montar
she jumped her horse over the fencehizo saltar la valla a su caballo
3. (fig) (= skip) → saltarse
the film jumped the first ten years of his lifela película se saltó los diez primeros años de su vida
you've jumped a pagete has saltado una página
to jump the lights (Aut) → saltarse el semáforo (en rojo)
to jump the queue (Brit) → colarse
4. (= leave, escape)
to jump bail (Jur) → fugarse estando bajo fianza
to jump the rails [train] → descarrilar, salirse de la vía
to jump ship (lit) → desertar (de un buque) (fig) (= leave) → marcharse; (= join rival organization) → irse con la competencia
my salary was lousy so I jumped shiptenía un sueldo mísero así que me marché
to jump town (US) → abandonar la ciudad
5. (= anticipate) to jump the gunprecipitarse
6. (= board) to jump a trainsubirse a un tren sin billete
7. (= attack) → echarse encima de
one of them jumped him from behinduno de ellos se le echó encima por detrás
D. CPD jump jet Navión m de despegue vertical
jump leads NPL (Brit) (Aut) → cables mpl de arranque (de batería)
jump rope N (US) → comba f, cuerda f de saltar
jump seat N (Aut, Aer) → asiento m plegable
jump about jump around VI + ADV
1. (lit) → dar saltos, brincar
2. (fig) → dar saltos
the story jumps about a bitla historia da muchos saltos
jump down VI + ADVbajar de un salto
jump in VI + ADV
1. (into car) → subirse corriendo; (into water) → tirarse
jump in!¡sube!, ¡vamos!
2. (fig) (in situation, conversation) → intervenir
the government had to jump in and buy millions of dollars worth of suppliesel gobierno tuvo que intervenir y comprar suministros por valor de millones de dólares
jump off VI + ADV (Showjumping) → desempatar
jump out VI + ADV (= appear suddenly) → salir de un salto; (from vehicle) → bajar de un salto
he jumped out from behind a treesalió de un salto de detrás de un árbol
it jumps out at you (fig) → salta a la vista

jump

[ˈdʒʌmp]
vi
(= leap) [person] → sauter, bondir
to jump over sth → sauter par-dessus qch, sauter qch
to jump out of the window → sauter par la fenêtre
to jump from one's seat → sauter de son siège
to jump to one's feet → sauter sur ses pieds
[animal] → sauter
to jump over sth [+ hedge, stream, wall] → sauter qch
(= start) → sursauter
(= increase) → monter en flèche
vt
[+ distance] → sauter, franchir; [+ stream, fence] → sauter
(British) to jump the queue → passer avant son tour
n
(= leap) [person, animal] → saut m, bond m
(= rise) (in prices, level, amount)bond m
a jump in sth → un bond de qch
(= startled movement) → sursaut m
(= fence) → obstacle m
jump about
visautiller
jump at
vt fus [+ chance] → sauter sur
He jumped at the offer → Il a sauté sur la proposition.
jump down
visauter (pour descendre)
jump off
vi [passenger, rider] → descendre d'un bond
vt fus [+ bus, train, horse] → sauter de
to jump off the roof → sauter du toit
jump on
vi [passenger, rider] → monter d'un bond
vt fus [+ bus, plane, train] → sauter dans
jump up
vi (= leap) → se lever d'un bondjumped-up [ˌdʒʌmptˈʌp] (British) adj (= pushy) → parvenu(e) (= cheeky) → effronté(e) (= self-important) → prétentieux/euse
He's nothing better than a jumped-up bank clerk → Ce n'est qu'un petit employé de banque qui a monté en grade.

jump

n
(lit)Sprung m; (with parachute) → Absprung m; (on race-course) → Hindernis nt; this horse is no good over the jumpsdieses Pferd taugt bei den Hindernissen nichts
(fig) (of prices)(plötzlicher or sprunghafter) Anstieg; (in narrative) → Sprung m, → abrupter Übergang; to take a sudden jump (prices, temperature) → ruckartig or sprunghaft ansteigen (→ to auf +acc), → in die Höhe schnellen; a 5% jump in the number of unemployed peopleein 5%iger Anstieg der Arbeitslosenziffern; it’s a big jump from medical student to doctores ist ein großer Sprung vom Medizinstudenten zum Arzt; he’s always one jump aheader ist immer einen Schritt voraus; you can take a running jump (Brit inf) → das kannst du vergessen
(= start) to give a jumpzusammenfahren; my heart gave a jumpmein Herz machte einen Sprung
(esp US inf) to get a or the jump on somebody/somethingjdm/etw gegenüber im Vorteil sein; to give somebody a or the jump on somebody/somethingjdm einen Vorsprung vor jdm/etw verschaffen
vi
(= leap)springen, einen Satz machen; (Sport) → springen; (parachutist)(ab)springen; to jump into a riverin einen Fluss springen; this horse jumps welldieses Pferd springt gut or nimmt die Hindernisse gut; to jump for joyeinen Freudensprung machen; (heart)vor Freude hüpfen; to jump to one’s feetaufspringen; to jump up and down on the spotauf der Stelle hüpfen; they jumped up and down on his stomachsie hüpften auf seinem Bauch herum; they’re jumping up and down about it (fig)sie regen sich furchtbar darüber auf; to jump to conclusionsvorschnelle Schlüsse ziehen
(typewriter)Buchstaben überspringen or auslassen
(fig)springen, unvermittelt übergehen; (prices, shares)in die Höhe schnellen, sprunghaft ansteigen; jump to it!los schon!, mach schon!; the film suddenly jumps from the 18th into the 20th centuryder Film macht plötzlich einen Sprung vom 18. ins 20. Jahrhundert; her salary jumped from £15,000 to £22,000ihr Gehalt schnellte von £ 15.000 auf £ 22.000; if you keep jumping from one thing to anotherwenn Sie nie an einer Sache bleiben; she jumped from kitchen assistant to chefsie stieg plötzlich von der Küchenhilfe zur Köchin auf; let’s offer £200 and see which way they jump (inf)machen wir ihnen doch (einfach) ein Angebot von £ 200 und sehen dann, wie sie darauf reagieren
(= start)zusammenfahren, zusammenzucken; the shout made him jumper zuckte or fuhr bei dem Schrei zusammen; you made me jumpdu hast mich (aber) erschreckt; his heart jumped when …sein Herz machte einen Satz, als …
vt
ditch, fence etcüberspringen, hinüberspringen über (+acc); the horse jumped a clear rounddas Pferd sprang eine fehlerfreie Runde; he jumped two metreser hat zwei Meter übersprungen
horsespringen lassen; he jumped his horse over the fenceer setzte mit seinem Pferd über den Zaun
(= skip)überspringen, auslassen
(pick-up) grooveüberspringen; to jump the rails (train)entgleisen; to jump a man (Draughts) → einen überspringen
(inf usages) to jump bail (Jur) → abhauen (inf) (während man auf Kaution freigelassen ist); to jump a claimeinen schon bestehenden Anspruch (auf Land or Rechte) übergehen; to jump the lights or a red lightbei Rot rüberfahren (inf)or über die Kreuzung fahren; to jump the queue (Brit) → sich vordrängeln; to jump ship (Naut, passenger) → das Schiff vorzeitig verlassen; (sailor) → heimlich abheuern; (fig: = leave failing organization etc) → das sinkende Schiff verlassen; (= join rival organization etc)abspringen (und zur Konkurrenz gehen); to jump a train (= get on)auf einen Zug aufspringen; (= get off)von einem Zug abspringen; they jumped a train to Acapulcosie fuhren schwarz nach Acapulco; to jump somebodyjdn überfallen

jump

:
jump jet
jump jockey
n (Brit Horse Racing) → Springreiter(in) m(f)
jump leads
pl (Brit Aut) → Starthilfekabel nt
jump-off
n (Showjumping) → Stechen nt
jump pass
n (Basketball) → Sprungpass m
jump rope
n (US) = skipping rope
jump seat
nNotsitz m, → Klappsitz m
jump shot
n (Basketball) → Sprungwurf m
jump-start
n (Mot) → Starthilfe f; to give somebody a jump (lit, fig)jdm Starthilfe geben
vt (Mot) → Starthilfe geben; (fig: = start) → in Gang setzen or bringen, anschieben (fig)
jump suit
nOverall m

jump

[dʒʌmp]
1. vi (gen) (Sport) → saltare; (in fright) → fare un salto, trasalire; (prices) → aumentare di colpo
to jump about → fare salti, saltellare
to jump over sth → saltare oltre qc
to jump in/out → saltare dentro/fuori
to jump off/on(to) sth → saltare giù da/su qc
to jump out (of) the window → saltare giù dalla finestra
to jump out of bed → saltare fuori dal letto
he jumped into a taxi → è saltato su un tassì
she jumped to her feet → si alzò di scatto, balzò in piedi
to jump up → saltare in piedi
to jump down → saltare giù
to jump up and down → saltellare
there's no need to jump down my throat! (fam) → non è il caso di aggredirmi così!
I almost jumped out of my skin! (fam) → ho fatto un salto!
jump to it! (fam) → presto, sbrigati!
to jump to conclusions → arrivare a conclusioni affrettate
2. vt (ditch, fence) → saltare; (horse) → far saltare
to jump the rails (train) → deragliare
to jump bail (Law) scappare quando si è in libertà provvisoria sotto cauzione
don't jump the gun! (fig) (fam) → non correre troppo!
to jump the lights (Aut) → passare con il (semaforo) rosso
to jump the queue (Brit) → passare davanti agli altri (in una coda)
to jump ship → lasciare la nave senza permesso
to jump sb (fam) → assalire qn
3. n
a. (gen) (Sport) → salto
to give a jump (also) (fig) (nervously) → fare un salto
my heart gave a jump → ho provato un tuffo al cuore
in or at one jump → in un salto
a jump in prices → un'impennata dei prezzi
to be one jump ahead of sb (fig) → essere un passo avanti a qn
b. (Showjumping) → salto; (fence) → ostacolo
jump at vi + prep (fig) → cogliere or afferrare al volo
he jumped at the offer → si affrettò ad accettare l'offerta

jump

(dʒamp) verb
1. to (cause to) go quickly off the ground with a springing movement. He jumped off the wall / across the puddle / over the fallen tree / into the swimming-pool; Don't jump the horse over that fence!
2. to rise; to move quickly (upwards). She jumped to her feet; He jumped into the car.
3. to make a startled movement. The noise made me jump.
4. to pass over (a gap etc) by bounding. He jumped the stream easily.
noun
1. an act of jumping. She crossed the stream in one jump.
2. an obstacle to be jumped over. Her horse fell at the third jump.
3. a jumping competition. the high jump.
4. a startled movement. She gave a jump when the door suddenly banged shut.
5. a sudden rise, eg in prices. There has been a jump in the price of potatoes.
ˈjumpy adjective
nervous; easily upset. He has been very jumpy and irritable lately.
jump at
to take or accept eagerly. He jumped at the chance to go to Germany for a fortnight.
jump for joy
to show great pleasure.
jump on
to make a sudden attack on. He was waiting round the corner and jumped on me in the dark.
jump the gun
to start before the proper time. We shouldn't be going on holiday till tomorrow, but we jumped the gun and caught today's last flight.
jump the queue
to move ahead of others in a queue without waiting for one's proper turn. Many wealthy or important people try to jump the queue for hospital beds.
jump to conclusions / jump to the conclusion that
to form an idea without making sure of the facts. He saw my case in the hall and jumped to the conclusion that I was leaving.
jump to it
to hurry up. If you don't jump to it you'll miss the train.

jump

يَقْفِزُ poskočit hoppe springen πηδώ saltar hypätä sauter skočiti saltare 跳びはねる 뛰다 springen hoppe skoczyć pular прыгать hoppa กระโดด atlamak nhảy 跳跃

jump

n. salto, brinco;
v. saltar, brincar.
References in classic literature ?
Bhaer down on his hands and knees, with Tina on his back, Kitty leading him with a jump rope, and Minnie feeding two small boys with seedcakes, as they roared and ramped in cages built of chairs.
He sprang up as if he meant to jump, but the girl shrieked and held him back.
See, the heel has hardly touched the ground; and there the dark-hair has made a little jump, from root to root.
To jump out of the window would be admirable exercise, but the bars are too strong even to try.
A gentleman alighted; but it was only to offer his hand to a young girl whose slender figure, nowise needing such assistance, now lightly descended the steps, and made an airy little jump from the final one to the sidewalk.
His terror rose to desperation; he rained a shower of kicks and blows upon Gunpowder, hoping by a sudden movement to give his companion the slip; but the spectre started full jump with him.
There was such a flood of good faith in it that, though I had not yet seen the child, my very fears made me jump to the absurdity of the idea.
True, they rather order me about some, and make me jump from spar to spar, like a grasshopper in a May meadow.
He announced himself as the archangel Gabriel, and commanded the captain to jump overboard.
He must never start at what he sees, nor speak to other horses, nor bite, nor kick, nor have any will of his own; but always do his master's will, even though he may be very tired or hungry; but the worst of all is, when his harness is once on, he may neither jump for joy nor lie down for weariness.
Jurgis turned away, and then in a sudden rush the full realization of his triumph swept over him, and he gave a yell and a jump, and started off on a run.
JUMP AND RUN, THE BOAT'S AFIRE AND THERE AIN'T A MINUTE TO LOSE

Full browser ?