juncture

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Related to junctures: imperiously, yammered

junc·ture

 (jŭngk′chər)
n.
1.
a. The act of joining or the condition of being joined.
b. A place where two things are joined; a junction or joint.
2. A point in time, especially one requiring a decision to be made: "Is this the appropriate juncture to speak the truth in that frank and candid way?" (Elinor Lipman).
3. The transition or mode of transition from one sound to another in speech.

[Middle English, from Latin iūnctūra, from iūnctus, past participle of iungere, to join; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.]

juncture

(ˈdʒʌŋktʃə)
n
1. a point in time, esp a critical one (often in the phrase at this juncture)
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) linguistics
a. a pause in speech or a feature of pronunciation that introduces, accompanies, or replaces a pause
b. the set of phonological features signalling a division between words, such as those that distinguish a name from an aim
3. a less common word for junction

junc•ture

(ˈdʒʌŋk tʃər)

n.
1. a point of time, esp. one made critical by a concurrence of circumstances: At this juncture, we must decide whether to continue negotiations.
2. a serious state of affairs; crisis.
3. the line or point at which two bodies are joined; joint or articulation; seam.
4. an act of joining or the state of being joined.
5. something by which two things are joined.
6.
a. a transition between successive speech sounds or between a speech sound and silence, as at the boundary of a morpheme, word, or clause, marked by a break in articulatory continuity: Juncture distinguishes words such as night rateand nitrate.
b. the feature marking such a transition.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin junctūra]
junc′tur•al, adj.
syn: See junction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.juncture - an event that occurs at a critical timejuncture - an event that occurs at a critical time; "at such junctures he always had an impulse to leave"; "it was needed only on special occasions"
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
climax, flood tide - the highest point of anything conceived of as growing or developing or unfolding; "the climax of the artist's career"; "in the flood tide of his success"
conjuncture - a critical combination of events or circumstances
crisis - a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something; "after the crisis the patient either dies or gets better"
turning point, landmark, watershed - an event marking a unique or important historical change of course or one on which important developments depend; "the agreement was a watershed in the history of both nations"
milestone - a significant event in your life (or in a project)
straits, pass, head - a difficult juncture; "a pretty pass"; "matters came to a head yesterday"
reality check - an occasion on which one is reminded of the nature of things in the real world; "this program is intended as a reality check for CEOs"; "after all those elaborate productions, I felt in need of a reality check"
2.juncture - a crisis situation or point in time when a critical decision must be made; "at that juncture he had no idea what to do"; "he must be made to realize that the company stands at a critical point"
crisis - an unstable situation of extreme danger or difficulty; "they went bankrupt during the economic crisis"
criticality - a critical state; especially the point at which a nuclear reaction is self-sustaining
3.juncture - the shape or manner in which things come together and a connection is madejuncture - the shape or manner in which things come together and a connection is made
esophagogastric junction, oesophagogastric junction - the junction between the esophagus and the stomach epithelium
connexion, link, connection - a connecting shape

juncture

juncture

noun
1. A point or position at which two or more things are joined:
2. A particular interval of time that is limited and often crucial:
3. A decisive point:
Translations
نُقْطَة إتِّصال
v té chvíli
punkttidspunkt
tímamót, aî svo komnu máli
tuo momentu
šādos apstākļosšajā brīdī
bu andabu aşamada

juncture

[ˈdʒʌŋktʃəʳ] N (fig) (= point) → coyuntura f
at this junctureen este momento, a estas alturas

juncture

[ˈdʒʌŋktʃər] n (= time) → moment m
at this juncture → à ce moment-là

juncture

n at this juncturezu diesem Zeitpunkt

juncture

[ˈdʒʌnktʃəʳ] n (fig) (critical point) → momento critico
at this juncture → in questo frangente

juncture

(ˈdʒaŋktʃə) : at this/that juncture
at this or that moment or point. At this juncture the chairman declared the meeting closed.

junc·ture

n. juntura; coyuntura.
References in classic literature ?
Its eyes (for it appeared to possess a pair) were bent on Mother Rigby, and at suitable junctures it nodded or shook its head.
Usually, the danger is in the moment of leaving the ground, or of alighting, and therefore at those junctures we should never omit the utmost precaution.
asked Professor Bumper, coming up at this juncture.
And, therefore, since we have been unfortunate enough to introduce our heroine at so inauspicious a juncture, we would entreat for a mood of due solemnity in the spectators of her fate.
They were attached at this juncture to the stitching in which I was engaged, and I can feel once more the spasm of my effort not to move them till I should so have steadied myself as to be able to make up my mind what to do.
It was curious and not unpleasing, how Peleg and Bildad were affected at this juncture, especially Captain Bildad.
Had you stepped on board the Pequod at a certain juncture of this post-mortemizing of the whale; and had you strolled forward nigh the windlass, pretty sure am I that you would have scanned with no small curiosity a very strange, enigmatical object, which you would have seen there, lying along lengthwise in the lee scuppers.
Most fortunately, at this juncture, Elzbieta got the long-awaited chance to go at five o'clock in the morning and help scrub the office floors of one of the packers.
At this critical juncture, old Cudjoe, the black man-of-all-work, put his head in at the door, and wished "Missis would come into the kitchen;" and our senator, tolerably relieved, looked after his little wife with a whimsical mixture of amusement and vexation, and, seating himself in the arm-chair, began to read the papers.