jungly


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jun·gle

 (jŭng′gəl)
n.
1. Land covered with a dense growth of tropical vegetation.
2. A dense thicket or growth.
3. A dense, confused mass; a jumble.
4. Something made up of many confused elements; a bewildering complex or maze: sorting through the jungle of regulations.
5. A place or milieu characterized by intense, often ruthless competition or struggle for survival: the corporate jungle.
6. Slang A place where hoboes camp.

[Ultimately from Sanskrit jaṅgalam, desert, wasteland, uncultivated area, from jaṅgala-, desert, waste.]

jun′gly (-glē) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.jungly - overgrown with tropical vegetation
wooded - covered with growing trees and bushes etc; "wooded land"; "a heavily wooded tract"
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References in classic literature ?
Boggley Wollah is situated in a fine, lonely, marshy, jungly district, famous for snipe-shooting, and where not unfrequently you may flush a tiger.
Below, it is a swampy, jungly region, full of snakes, insects, and fever.
Jungly Tails, Pet Tails, Farm Tails or, as featured below, Dino Tails
Ivy and yellow flowers mat the roofs as if burped out by the jungly chimneys, and at the end of the season their children come in droves, shrill and, like glassy parlor curiosities, blind.
On top of that, the Paraguayan government, basically at the same time Instructor Zero was presumed to have been in the country's jungly northeast, took measures to strengthen its military ties with Great Britain, Israel, and South Korea.
Tenders are invited for Uprooting, cleaning and cutting of grasses, jungly plants and bushes in 132/33 kV Switchyard area at BTPS and area in between switchyard and power house main building at BTPS, BTPS PSS and pruning of trees under the 33 kV, 11 kV and 415 Volt line as and when required for the period from 01.
In an interview, Tartt noted such patterns of development: ornate mansions lapsing after the Civil War into decayed husks and jungly gardens, ringed first by industry, then by drive-in culture in the 1950s, and finally by mall culture in the 1970s, with each ring successively abandoned.
Forms that resemble totemic creatures push and pull at a globe (perhaps our earth) like huge cats batting at a ball of yarn in a jungly night.
As Mughal control extended into jungly Bengal, especially in the seventeenth century, they incorporated new subjects less violently by offering incentives to Bengalis themselves to participate in forest removal.
After this, the gander is immediately directed to the jungly region at the foot of Mount Vindhya and then to Vindhya itself, both of which are occupied only by elephants, bees.