junk food


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junk food

n.
A high-calorie food that is low in nutritional value.

junk food

n
(Cookery) food that is low in nutritional value, often highly processed or ready-prepared, and eaten instead of or in addition to well-balanced meals

junk′ food`


n.
1. food, as potato chips or candy, that is high in calories but of little nutritional value.
2. anything that is attractive or diverting but of negligible substance.
[1970–75]
junk′-food`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.junk food - food that tastes good but is high in calories having little nutritional valuejunk food - food that tastes good but is high in calories having little nutritional value
solid food, food - any solid substance (as opposed to liquid) that is used as a source of nourishment; "food and drink"
Translations
طَعام بسيط سريع قليل الفائِده
bufetová strava
junkfood
egészségtelen ennivaló
malo vredna hrana
abur cubur yiyecek

junk food

ncibo a scarso valore nutritivo

junk1

(dʒaŋk) noun
unwanted or worthless articles; rubbish. That cupboard is full of junk; (also adjective) This vase was bought in a junk shop (= a shop that sells junk).
ˈjunk food noun
food such as potato chips, sweets and doughnuts, which is mass-produced and is of low nutritional value.

junk food

n comida chatarra, comida basura (esp. Esp)
References in periodicals archive ?
She said due to salty, saucy and greasy junk food and soft drinks tooth decay was on the rise among kids across the country especially in the posh localities.
Junk food is also usually high in added sugars, salt and saturated or trans fats.
Nutrition Experts urged the sale of junk food in schools canteens needs to be discouraged as it is necessary to make the future citizens healthy and fit.
The charity, which commisas sioned the study, is calling on regulator Ofcom to ban junk food ads from breaks in prime-time shows popular with youngsters.
The Obesity Health Alliance (OHA) has called for a 9pm watershed to protect children from junk food marketing.
If junk food and fizzy drinks are heavily taxed in Oman, it will encourage people to go for healthy choices and prevent dangerous diseases.
At the same time, this week's BMJ carries a story showing that in the UK spending on junk food advertising is nearly 30 times what government spends on promoting healthy eating.
The millions spent on junk food advertising also "dwarfs" the PS5.
The World Health Organisation have also said laws on junk food advertising to children are insufficient.
The youths are often turning to social media platforms and blogs to make people aware of the risks of consuming junk food.
Dr Al Madani said he would not favour a tax on junk food being brought in, which countries such as Denmark, France and Finland have.
Their researchers spoke to kids about junk food and found they used words such as "tempting" and "addictive" to describe it.