junketing


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jun·ket

 (jŭng′kĭt)
n.
1. A trip or tour, especially:
a. One taken by an official at public expense.
b. One taken by a person who is the guest of a business or agency seeking favor or patronage.
2. A party, banquet, or outing.
3. A dessert made from flavored milk and rennet.
intr.v. jun·ket·ed, jun·ket·ing, jun·kets
To go on a junket.

[Middle English jonket, rush basket, preparation of cream or milk served on rushes, feast; akin to modern French dialectal (Normandy) jonquette, a kind of dessert made with boiled milk, and French jonchée, container made of rushes for draining soft cheeses, soft cheese made in such a container, all ultimately from Latin iuncus, rush; see jonquil.]

jun′ket·er n.
Word History: In medieval times, soft cheeses and similar foods made from milk and cream were prepared in baskets or on mats woven from grasslike plants called rushes. These baskets or mats would have allowed excess liquid to drain away while protecting the mass of coagulated milk or cream from breaking apart. Junket originally meant "rush basket, especially one for carrying fish," and is ultimately derived from the Latin word junca, "rush." Since delicate dishes of cream or milk could be served in these rush baskets or on these mats, junket became the name for the dishes themselves. By the early 1500s, the word had come to refer to an occasion at which a junket might be served—a banquet, feast, or bout of merrymaking in general. Then, during the 1800s in the United States, it developed the meaning "picnic, pleasure excursion with eating and drinking." Americans began to use the word junket especially of trips taken by officials at public expense, ostensibly for fact-finding or diplomatic purposes but really just for the officials' own enjoyment. Junket also came to refer to trips taken by politicians or other influential persons as guests of a business or organization seeking favors—a bribe in the form of cruise tickets.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.junketing - taking an excursion for pleasure
travel, traveling, travelling - the act of going from one place to another; "he enjoyed selling but he hated the travel"
Translations

junketing

[ˈdʒʌŋkɪtɪŋ] N (also junketings) → festividades fpl, fiestas fpl

junketing

n
(old, hum, = merrymaking) → Festivitäten pl (esp hum), → Lustbarkeit f (old, hum)
(= trips at public expense)(Vergnügungs)reisen plauf Staatskosten

junketing

[ˈdʒʌŋkɪtɪŋ] n (fam, pej) to go junketingfare bisboccia; (trip) → farsi un viaggetto pagato (dallo stato)
References in classic literature ?
Departure of Captain Bonneville for the Columbia Advance of Wyeth Efforts to keep the lead Hudson's Bay party A junketing A delectable beverage Honey and alcohol High carousing The Canadian "bon vivant" A cache A rapid move Wyeth and his plans His travelling companions Buffalo hunting More conviviality An interruption.
Upon this, the third day of junketing, it was tiresome to have to restrain oneself even from such innocent excursions of fancy.
It is easy for him to talk of reparation, fresh from journeying and junketing in foreign lands, and living a life of vanity and pleasure.
Lors, it's as good as a junketing to 'em when they see me wi' my pack, an' I shall niver pick up such bargains for 'em again.
So it doesn't look good when bosses go junketing at times like these: and most employers are showing sensitivity to the difficult circumstances of their employees.
EUROMP Glenys Kinnock has hit back at allegations of junketing in the Seychelles.
He vows it will be immediately evident that his version isn't just another junketing junket.
But while I carry no torch for freeloading councillors, I'm always a little wary of criticising junketing, as journalists are the greatest beneficiaries of hospitality at another's expense.