jury


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Related to jury: jury duty, Jury nullification, hung jury, Jury selection

ju·ry 1

 (jo͝or′ē)
n. pl. ju·ries
1. Law A body of persons selected to decide a verdict in a legal case, based upon the evidence presented, after being given instructions on the applicable law. Also called petit jury, trial jury.
2. A committee that judges contestants or applicants, as in a competition or exhibition; a panel of judges.
tr.v. ju·ried, ju·ry·ing, ju·ries
To judge or evaluate by a jury: jurying submitted samples for a crafts fair.

[Middle English jure, from Anglo-Norman juree, from feminine past participle of jurer, to swear, from Latin iūrāre, from iūs, iūr-, law; see yewes- in Indo-European roots.]

ju·ry 2

 (jo͝or′ē)
adj. Nautical
Intended or designed for temporary use; makeshift: a jury sail.

[From jury-rig.]

jury

(ˈdʒʊərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Law) a group of, usually twelve, people sworn to deliver a true verdict according to the evidence upon a case presented in a court of law. See also grand jury, petit jury
2. a body of persons appointed to judge a competition and award prizes
3. the jury is still out informal it has not yet been decided or agreed on
[C14: from Old French juree, from jurer to swear; see juror]

jury

(ˈdʒʊərɪ)
adj
(Nautical Terms) chiefly nautical (in combination) makeshift: jury-rigged.
[C17: of unknown origin]

ju•ry1

(ˈdʒʊər i)

n., pl. -ries, n.
1. a group of persons sworn to render a verdict or true answer on a question or questions submitted to them, esp. such a group selected by law and sworn to examine the evidence in a case and render a verdict to a court.
2. a group of persons chosen to adjudge prizes, awards, etc., as in a competition.
Idioms:
the jury is (still) out, a decision, determination, or opinion has yet to be rendered: The jury is still out on a location for the new museum.
v.t.
3. to select or evaluate (entries), as by means of a jury.
[1250–1300; Middle English jurie, juree < Old French juree oath, juridical inquiry, n. use of feminine past participle of jurer to swear; see juror]
ju′ry•less, adj.
usage: See collective noun.

ju•ry2

(ˈdʒʊər i)

adj.
makeshift or temporary, as for an emergency: a jury mast; a jury rig.
[1610–20; perhaps to be identified with late Middle English i(u)were help, aid, aph. form of Old French ajurie, derivative of aidier to aid]

Jury

 a group of people empaneled to reach a verdict in a trial or to award prizes in a competitive event; a dozen people.
Examples: jury of the apostles, 1649.

jury

A group of citizens summoned to a court to hear a case and give a verdict.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jury - a body of citizens sworn to give a true verdict according to the evidence presented in a court of lawjury - a body of citizens sworn to give a true verdict according to the evidence presented in a court of law
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
court, judicature, tribunal - an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
grand jury - a jury to inquire into accusations of crime and to evaluate the grounds for indictments
hung jury - a jury that is unable to agree on a verdict (the result is a mistrial)
petit jury, petty jury - a jury of 12 to determine the facts and decide the issue in civil or criminal proceedings
blue ribbon jury, special jury - a jury whose members are selected for special knowledge for a case involving complicated issues
juror, juryman, jurywoman - someone who serves (or waits to be called to serve) on a jury
2.jury - a committee appointed to judge a competition
commission, committee - a special group delegated to consider some matter; "a committee is a group that keeps minutes and loses hours" - Milton Berle
Translations
المُحَكِّمين في المبارياتالـمُحَلَّفُونَمُحَلَّفون، هَيئَة مُحَلَّفين
porota
jurynævningdommerkomite
lautamiehistöraatituomarineuvostotuomaristovalamiehistö
porota
esküdtszékzsűri
dómnefndkviîdómur
審判団陪審陪審員
배심
prisiekusiejiprisiekusysisvertinimo komisijažiuri
žūrijazvērinātiezvērināto tiesa
porota
porota
jury
คณะลูกขุน
jüriyarışma jürisi
bồi thẩm đoàn

jury

[ˈdʒʊərɪ]
A. Njurado m
trial by juryproceso con jurado
to serve or be on a juryser miembro de un jurado
the jury is still out on that oneeso está por ver, no hay una opinión clara sobre eso
B. CPD jury box Ntribuna f del jurado
jury duty N to do jury dutyactuar como jurado
jury rigging Namaño m de un jurado GRAND JURY

jury

[ˈdʒʊəri] n
(in court of law)jury m
trial by jury → jugement par jury
the jury is still out (= it has not yet been decided) → cela reste à voir
The jury is out on whether or not this is true → Reste à voir si c'est vrai.jury box nbanc m des jurésjury duty n (US, Scottish) to do jury duty → faire partie d'un juryjury foreman n (in court of law)chef m du jury

jury

n
(Jur) the jurydie Schöffen pl, → die Jury; (for capital crimes) → die Geschworenen pl; they don’t have juries theredort gibt es keine Schöffengerichte or keine Jury or (for capital crimes) → keine Schwurgerichte; to sit or be on the jurySchöffe/Geschworener sein; Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jurymeine Damen und Herren Schöffen/Geschworenen; the jury is (still) out (lit)die Schöffen/Geschworenen beraten noch; (fig)es ist noch nichts entschieden; the jury is out on whether this is truees ist noch nicht heraus, ob das stimmt
(for examination) → Prüfungsausschuss m; (for exhibition, competition) → Jury f, → Preisgericht nt

jury

:
jury box
nSchöffenbank f; (for capital crimes) → Geschworenenbank f
juryman
nSchöffe m; (for capital crimes) → Geschworene(r) m
jury rig
n (Naut) → Hilfstakelage f, → Nottakelage f
jury service
nSchöffenamt nt; (for capital crimes) → Amt ntdes Geschworenen; to do jurySchöffe/Geschworener sein; he’s never been called for juryer wurde nie als Schöffe/Geschworener berufen
jury system
nJurysystem nt, → Schöffengerichte pl; (for capital crimes) → Schwurgerichte pl
jurywoman
nSchöffin f; (for capital crimes) → Geschworene f

jury

[ˈdʒʊərɪ] n (Law) (for contest) → giuria
to serve on a jury → far parte di una giuria

jury

(ˈdʒuəri) plural ˈjuries noun
1. a group of people legally selected to hear a case and to decide what are the facts, eg whether or not a prisoner accused of a crime is guilty. The verdict of the jury was that the prisoner was guilty of the crime.
2. a group of judges for a competition, contest etc. The jury recorded their votes for the song contest.
ˈjuror, ˈjuryman nouns
a member of a jury in a law court.

jury

الـمُحَلَّفُونَ porota jury Geschworene σώμα ενόρκων jurado valamiehistö jury porota giuria 陪審 배심 jury jury sąd przysięgłych júri присяжные jury คณะลูกขุน jüri bồi thẩm đoàn 陪审团
References in classic literature ?
The coroner's jury sat upon the corpse, and, like sensible men, returned an unassailable verdict of "Sudden Death
Even a jury would have penetration enough to discover that.
After the coroner's jury had viewed the body and its surroundings, Wilson suggested a search upstairs, and he went along.
After a long wait the jury filed in and took their places; shortly afterward, Potter, pale and haggard, timid and hopeless, was brought in, with chains upon him, and seated where all the curious eyes could stare at him; no less con- spicuous was Injun Joe, stolid as ever.
This much, Jerry, with his head becoming more and more spiky as the law terms bristled it, made out with huge satisfaction, and so arrived circuitously at the understanding that the aforesaid, and over and over again aforesaid, Charles Darnay, stood there before him upon his trial; that the jury were swearing in; and that Mr.
Jaggers was altogether too many for the Jury, and they gave in.
The first affirmed, "the justest method would be, to lay a certain tax upon vices and folly; and the sum fixed upon every man to be rated, after the fairest manner, by a jury of his neighbours.
But the English lawyers had decided that Parliament was omnipotent--and Parliament, in its omnipotence, instead of trial by jury and the Habeas Corpus, enacted admiralty courts in England to try Americans for offences charged against them as committed in America; instead of the privileges of Magna Charta, nullified the charter itself of Massachusetts Bay; shut up the port of Boston; sent armies and navies to keep the peace and teach the colonies that John Hampden was a rebel and Algernon Sidney a traitor.
It would be as absurd to doubt, that a right to pass all laws NECESSARY AND PROPER to execute its declared powers, would include that of requiring the assistance of the citizens to the officers who may be intrusted with the execution of those laws, as it would be to believe, that a right to enact laws necessary and proper for the imposition and collection of taxes would involve that of varying the rules of descent and of the alienation of landed property, or of abolishing the trial by jury in cases relating to it.
In cases of capture; of piracy; of the post office; of coins, weights, and measures; of trade with the Indians; of claims under grants of land by different States; and, above all, in the case of trials by courts-marshal in the army and navy, by which death may be inflicted without the intervention of a jury, or even of a civil magistrate; in all these cases the powers of the Confederation operate immediately on the persons and interests of individual citizens.
Customs have been handed down by ages of repetition, but the punishment for ignoring a custom is a matter for individual treatment by a jury of the culprit's peers, and I may say that justice seldom misses fire, but seems rather to rule in inverse ratio to the ascendency of law.
If he were to sit there and die of cold, there would be mighty little gained; better the police cell and the chances of a jury trial, than the miserable certainty of death at a dyke-side before the next winter's dawn, or death a little later in the gas- lighted wards of an infirmary.