justified


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jus·ti·fy

 (jŭs′tə-fī′)
tr.v. jus·ti·fied, jus·ti·fy·ing, jus·ti·fies
1. To demonstrate or prove to be just, right, or valid: justified each budgetary expense as necessary; anger that is justified by the circumstances.
2. To free (a human) of the guilt and penalty attached to grievous sin. Used of God.
3. Law
a. To demonstrate sufficient legal reason for (an action taken).
b. To prove to be qualified as a bondsman.
4. To format (a paragraph, for example) so that the lines of text begin and end evenly at a straight margin.

[Middle English justifien, from Old French justifier, from Late Latin iūstificāre, from Latin, to act justly toward : iūstus, just; see just1 + -ficāre, -fy.]

justified

(ˈdʒʌstɪfaɪd)
adj
reasonable and acceptablehaving good and valid reasons
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.justified - having words so spaced that lines have straight even margins
printing process, printing - reproduction by applying ink to paper as for publication
even - being level or straight or regular and without variation as e.g. in shape or texture; or being in the same plane or at the same height as something else (i.e. even with); "an even application of varnish"; "an even floor"; "the road was not very even"; "the picture is even with the window"

justified

adjective acceptable, reasonable, understandable, justifiable, natural, normal, legitimate, logical, to be expected In my opinion, the decision was wholly justified.
Translations
upravičen

justified

[ˈdʒʌstɪfaɪd] ADJ
1. (gen) → justificado
to be justified in doing sthtener motivos para hacer algo, tener razón al hacer algo
am I justified in thinking that ...?¿hay motivo para creer que ...?
2. (Jur) justified homicidehomicidio m justificado
3. (Typ) → justificado
right justifiedjustificado a la derecha

justified

[ˈdʒʌstɪfaɪd] adj
(= reasonable) [decision, action, idea] → justifié(e)
[person] to be justified in doing sth → avoir raison de faire qch
He was quite justified in refusing → Il a eu parfaitement raison de refuser.
References in classic literature ?
Until such a one chose to make some movement, no deeds in arms, no natural gifts, nor any renown as an orator, would have justified the slightest interruption.
No lesser sense of the infant fowl's importance could have justified, even in a mother's eyes, the perseverance with which she watched over its safety, ruffling her small person to twice its proper size, and flying in everybody's face that so much as looked towards her hopeful progeny.
His greatest admirer could not have cordially justified his bringing his harpoon into breakfast with him, and using it there without ceremony; reaching over the table with it, to the imminent jeopardy of many heads, and grappling the beefsteaks towards him.
One is quite justified in inferring that whatever one of these laws or customs was lacking in that remote time, its place was competently filled by a worse one.
This castle had its legend, too, but I should not feel justified in repeating it because I doubted the truth of some of its minor details.
Napoleon and all his kind stood accounted for-- and justified.
The tears began to flow now as she attempted to explain sins that never could be explained or justified.
On the contrary, her plans and proceedings were more and more justified and endeared to her by the general appearances of the next few days.
Sir John had dropped hints of past injuries and disappointments, which justified her belief of his being an unfortunate man, and she regarded him with respect and compassion.
of the parties, the less I felt justified in judging and blaming either him or Miss Ingram for acting in conformity to ideas and principles instilled into them, doubtless, from their childhood.
With your aid that may be avoided,' he continued; 'and should there be danger of such an event - should he be the cause of adding a single trouble more to her existence - why, I think I shall be justified in going to extremes
I have sought to impart this relief to the more serious passages in the book, not only because I believe myself to be justified in doing so by the laws of Art -- but because experience has taught me (what the experience of my readers will doubtless confirm) that there is no such moral phenomenon as unmixed tragedy to be found in the world around us.