justified


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jus·ti·fy

 (jŭs′tə-fī′)
tr.v. jus·ti·fied, jus·ti·fy·ing, jus·ti·fies
1. To demonstrate or prove to be just, right, or valid: justified each budgetary expense as necessary; anger that is justified by the circumstances.
2. To free (a human) of the guilt and penalty attached to grievous sin. Used of God.
3. Law
a. To demonstrate sufficient legal reason for (an action taken).
b. To prove to be qualified as a bondsman.
4. To format (a paragraph, for example) so that the lines of text begin and end evenly at a straight margin.

[Middle English justifien, from Old French justifier, from Late Latin iūstificāre, from Latin, to act justly toward : iūstus, just; see just1 + -ficāre, -fy.]

justified

(ˈdʒʌstɪfaɪd)
adj
reasonable and acceptablehaving good and valid reasons
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.justified - having words so spaced that lines have straight even margins
printing process, printing - reproduction by applying ink to paper as for publication
even - being level or straight or regular and without variation as e.g. in shape or texture; or being in the same plane or at the same height as something else (i.e. even with); "an even application of varnish"; "an even floor"; "the road was not very even"; "the picture is even with the window"

justified

adjective acceptable, reasonable, understandable, justifiable, natural, normal, legitimate, logical, to be expected In my opinion, the decision was wholly justified.
Translations
upravičen

justified

[ˈdʒʌstɪfaɪd] ADJ
1. (gen) → justificado
to be justified in doing sthtener motivos para hacer algo, tener razón al hacer algo
am I justified in thinking that ...?¿hay motivo para creer que ...?
2. (Jur) justified homicidehomicidio m justificado
3. (Typ) → justificado
right justifiedjustificado a la derecha

justified

[ˈdʒʌstɪfaɪd] adj
(= reasonable) [decision, action, idea] → justifié(e)
[person] to be justified in doing sth → avoir raison de faire qch
He was quite justified in refusing → Il a eu parfaitement raison de refuser.
References in classic literature ?
If he describes the impossible, he is guilty of an error; but the error may be justified, if the end of the art be thereby attained (the end being that already mentioned), if, that is, the effect of this or any other part of the poem is thus rendered more striking.
In general, the impossible must be justified by reference to artistic requirements, or to the higher reality, or to received opinion.
Nothing will turn me from it, Flintwinch, when I have justified it to myself.
They had seen the LIBERTY ASSUMED by a VERY FEW deputies from a VERY FEW States, convened at Annapolis, of recommending a great and critical object, wholly foreign to their commission, not only justified by the public opinion, but actually carried into effect by twelve out of the thirteen States.
But that the objectors may be disarmed of every pretext, it shall be granted for a moment that the convention were neither authorized by their commission, nor justified by circumstances in proposing a Constitution for their country: does it follow that the Constitution ought, for that reason alone, to be rejected?
To be justified in your eyes, he must do it in the most complete uncertainty of any provision.
At the same time, after what you have said, I do not feel justified in deciding on this matter entirely by myself.
Have I, by any chance justified you in telling me what happened this morning in the next room?
I have sought to impart this relief to the more serious passages in the book, not only because I believe myself to be justified in doing so by the laws of Art -- but because experience has taught me (what the experience of my readers will doubtless confirm) that there is no such moral phenomenon as unmixed tragedy to be found in the world around us.
Phileas Fogg was therefore justified in hoping that he would reach San Francisco by the 2nd of December, New York by the 11th, and London on the 20th--thus gaining several hours on the fatal date of the 21st of December.
Nothing of moment happened on the voyage; the steamer, sustained on its large paddles, rolled but little, and the Pacific almost justified its name.
Sillerton Jackson) was agreed that old Catherine had never had beauty--a gift which, in the eyes of New York, justified every success, and excused a certain number of failings.