juvenile

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ju·ve·nile

 (jo͞o′və-nīl′, -nəl)
adj.
1.
a. Not fully grown or developed; young.
b. Of or characteristic of a young animal that has not reached sexual maturity: a bird still in juvenile plumage.
2. Characteristic of, intended for, or appropriate for children or young people: juvenile fashions.
3. Marked by immaturity; childish: juvenile behavior. See Synonyms at young.
4. Geology Relating to or being water, gas, or a mineral-rich fluid believed to have originated from magma and to have come to the earth's surface for the first time.
n.
1.
a. A young person; a child.
b. A young animal that has not reached sexual maturity.
c. A two-year-old racehorse.
2. An actor who plays roles of children or young persons.
3. A children's book.

[Latin iuvenīlis, from iuvenis, young; see yeu- in Indo-European roots.]

ju′ve·nile′ly adv.
ju′ve·nile′ness n.

juvenile

(ˈdʒuːvɪˌnaɪl)
adj
1. young, youthful, or immature
2. suitable or designed for young people: juvenile pastimes.
3. (Biology) (of animals or plants) not yet fully mature
4. (Zoology) of or denoting young birds that have developed their first plumage of adult feathers
5. (Geological Science) geology occurring at the earth's surface for the first time; new: juvenile water; juvenile gases.
n
6. (Biology) a juvenile person, animal, or plant
7. (Theatre) an actor who performs youthful roles
8. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a book intended for young readers
[C17: from Latin juvenīlis youthful, from juvenis young]
ˈjuveˌnilely adv
ˈjuveˌnileness n

ju•ve•nile

(ˈdʒu və nl, -ˌnaɪl)

adj.
1. of, characteristic of, or suitable for children or young people: juvenile interests; juvenile books.
2. young; youthful.
3. immature; childish: juvenile tantrums.
n.
4. a young person; youth.
5.
a. a youthful male or female theatrical role.
b. an actor or actress who plays such parts.
6. a book for children.
7. a young bird when first fully feathered and before reaching maturity.
8. a two-year-old racehorse.
[1615–25; < Latin juvenīlis of a youth, youthful =juven(is) young + -īlis -ile2]
ju′ve•nile•ly, adv.

ju·ve·nile

(jo͞o′və-nīl′)
An animal or plant that is not fully grown or developed.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.juvenile - a young person, not fully developedjuvenile - a young person, not fully developed
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
juvenile body - the body of a young person
preteen, preteenager - a preadolescent boy or girl (usually between 9 and 12 years of age); "little league is intended for the preteens"
adolescent, stripling, teen, teenager - a juvenile between the onset of puberty and maturity
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
ingenue - an artless innocent young girl (especially as portrayed on the stage)
spring chicken, young person, younker, youth - a young person (especially a young man or boy)
adult, grownup - a fully developed person from maturity onward
Adj.1.juvenile - of or relating to or characteristic of or appropriate for children or young people; "juvenile diabetes"; "juvenile fashions"
2.juvenile - displaying or suggesting a lack of maturityjuvenile - displaying or suggesting a lack of maturity; "adolescent insecurity"; "jejune responses to our problems"; "their behavior was juvenile"; "puerile jokes"
immature - characteristic of a lack of maturity; "immature behavior"

juvenile

noun
1. child, youth, minor, girl, boy, teenager, infant, adolescent The number of juveniles in the general population has fallen.
child adult, grown-up
adjective
1. young, junior, adolescent, youthful, immature a scheme to lock up persistent juvenile offenders
young adult, responsible, mature, grown-up

juvenile

adjective
1. Being in an early period of growth or development:
2. Of or characteristic of a child, especially in immaturity:
noun
1. A young person between birth and puberty:
Informal: kid.
Scots: bairn.
2. One who is not yet legally of age:
Law: infant, minor.
Translations
حَدَثصِبياني، خاص بالأحْداث
dětinskýdětskýnedospělý
barnligmindreårig
lapsinuori
אינפנטיליילדותי
fiatalkorú
barnalegurungur
nepilnametis
bērnišķīgsjaunekļa-jauneklismuļķīgspusaudža-
aklı bir karış havadaçocukçagençgençler için

juvenile

[ˈdʒuːvənaɪl]
A. ADJ [books, sports etc] → juvenil (pej) → infantil (Jur) [court] → de menores
juvenile delinquentdelincuente mf juvenil
juvenile delinquencydelincuencia f juvenil
B. Njoven mf, menor mf

juvenile

[ˈdʒuːvənaɪl]
adj
[crime, offender] → juvénile
(= young) [bird, animal, player] → jeune
(= childish) [person] → puéril(e); [attitude, joke] → puéril(e)
n
(= young person) → adolescent(e) m/fjuvenile court ntribunal m pour enfantsjuvenile delinquency ndélinquance f juvénilejuvenile delinquent ndélinquant(e) m/f juvénile

juvenile

n (Admin) → Jugendliche(r) mf; (= animal)Jungtier nt
adj (= youthful)jugendlich; (= for young people)für Jugendliche; (pej)kindisch, unreif; juvenile crimeJugendkriminalität f

juvenile

:
juvenile center
n (US) → Heim ntfür jugendliche Straftäter
juvenile court
nJugendgericht nt
juvenile delinquency
juvenile delinquent
njugendlicher Straftäter, jugendliche Straftäterin
juvenile home
n (US) → Heim ntfür jugendliche Straftäter
juvenile lead
n (Theat) → Rolle fdes jugendlichen Hauptdarstellers; (actor) → jugendlicher Hauptdarsteller
juvenile offender
n (Jur) → jugendlicher Straftäter, jugendliche Straftäterin

juvenile

[ˈdʒuːvəˌnaɪl]
1. adj (offender) → minorenne; (crime) → minorile; (books, sports) → per ragazzi (pej) → puerile, infantile
2. n (Law) → minorenne m/f

juvenile

(ˈdʒuːvənail) adjective
1. (also noun) (a person who is) young or youthful. She will not be sent to prison – she is still a juvenile; juvenile offenders.
2. childish. juvenile behaviour.

ju·ve·nile

a. juvenil, joven;
___ arthritisartritis ___;
___ cataractcatarata ___;
___ delinquencydelincuencia ___;
___ myoclonic epilepsyepilepsia mioclónica ___;
___ on-set diabetesprincipio de diabetes ___;
___ pelvispelvis ___;
___ periodontitisperiodontitis ___;
___ plantar dermatitisdermatitis plantar ___.

juvenile

adj juvenil
References in classic literature ?
cried all the juveniles, both ladies and gentlemen.
Pickwick, as the juveniles turned away, after being presented.
The only person who offered enough to make it worth her while to try juvenile literature was a worthy gentleman who felt it his mission to convert all the world to his particular belief.
One, and she was the more juvenile in her appearance, though both were young, permitted glimpses of her dazzling complexion, fair golden hair, and bright blue eyes, to be caught, as she artlessly suffered the morning air to blow aside the green veil which descended low from her beaver.
So, although the order was fairly given out in Haley's hearing, and carried to Aunt Chloe by at least half a dozen juvenile messengers, that dignitary only gave certain very gruff snorts, and tosses of her head, and went on with every operation in an unusually leisurely and circumstantial manner.
It made him sigh; yes, and swear a little, in a poor juvenile sixth century way.
Shortly Tom came upon the juvenile pariah of the village, Huckleberry Finn, son of the town drunkard.
He was a blessing to all the juvenile part of the neighbourhood, for in summer he was for ever forming parties to eat cold ham and chicken out of doors, and in winter his private balls were numerous enough for any young lady who was not suffering under the unsatiable appetite of fifteen.
Hubble as a little curly sharp-edged person in sky-blue, who held a conventionally juvenile position, because she had married Mr.
Bob Cass was figuring in a hornpipe, and his father, very proud of this lithe son, whom he repeatedly declared to be just like himself in his young days in a tone that implied this to be the very highest stamp of juvenile merit, was the centre of a group who had placed themselves opposite the performer, not far from the upper door.
He fancied himself a burden to the society, forgetting in his perfectly juvenile good faith that he had fed this society for a month; and he set his mind actively to work.
Athos began to laugh, for this juvenile escapade of his appeared to be as amusing as if some one had related it of another person.