juvenilia


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ju·ve·nil·i·a

 (jo͞o′və-nĭl′ē-ə, -nĭl′yə)
pl.n.
Works, particularly written or artistic works, produced in an author's or artist's youth.

[Latin iuvenīlia, from neuter pl. of iuvenīlis, juvenile; see juvenile.]

juvenilia

(ˌdʒuːvɪˈnɪlɪə)
pl n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) works of art, literature, or music produced in youth or adolescence, before the artist, author, or composer has formed a mature style
[C17: from Latin, literally: youthful things; see juvenile]

ju•ve•nil•i•a

(ˌdʒu vəˈnɪl i ə, -ˈnɪl yə)

n.pl.
1. works, esp. writings, produced in one's youth.
2. literary or artistic productions suitable or designed for the young.
(Latin, n. use of neuter pl. of juvenīlis juvenile]

juvenilia

1. the literary compositions produced in an author’s youth.
2. literary productions intended for the young.
See also: Literary Style
Translations

juvenilia

[ˌdʒuːvɪˈnɪlɪə] NPLobras fpl de juventud

juvenilia

pl (form)Jugendwerke pl
References in periodicals archive ?
THE TOPIC: Jackson's third posthumous anthology, collected from her archive at the Library of Congress, contains short stories, family anecdotes, essays, and juvenilia.
Music can be extremely powerful to younger people and it should not be casually disregarded by us grownups as mere juvenilia," he said.
In any case, readers could use a guide to the new Stanford material: one that celebrates the poet's strongest manuscripts, recognizes uneven works, and highlights particularly accomplished poems in the selection of juvenilia.
Findlay starts with a long and mostly unnecessary history of the Scott Moncrieffs and an overly detailed account, stuffed with juvenilia, of C.
To support her aggressive interpretation, Gamier compares Joyce's early poems to works by Verlaine and Rimbaud and supports her readings with material (memoirs and juvenilia, for example) that at first seems ancillary and obscure.
The second, and largest, category is the huge body of juvenilia composed by Britten when he was a precociously gifted schoolboy, which is inevitably of variable quality, though the best of it is truly astonishing in its technical assurance.
The exhibition ignores Rothko's juvenilia --mostly Cezanne-lite oils that borrow profligately from his tutor Max Weber--and begins with his Untitled (Seated Woman) of 1930--one of his first experiments with coloured paper.
The illustrations that her sister, Cassandra, drew for Jane's "History of England" in Volume the Second of the juvenilia, however, are physiognomically inspired by the text.
Next, they were treated as juvenilia to be abandoned and later said to be irrelevant in the modern world and in socialist society.
Through engaging conversation and quotes from letters, juvenilia, and novels, she shares about her childhood, siblings, and the loves and losses that shaped her life.
Two hundred years on, Vaughan assesses just how much has really changed for women in that time by boldly revisiting the most rewarding moments from all six major novels - including Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility and Emma - as well as lesser known works such as Austen's juvenilia and the unfinished Sanditon.
This final volume of a 17-volume set presents Browning's last collection of poems, published on the day he died in 1889, plus 99 other pieces that were unpublished or uncontrolled during Browning's lifetime, including juvenilia, translations, and other ephemera.