kabaka


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kabaka

(kaˈbaka)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any of the former rulers of the Baganda people of S Uganda
[C19: from Luganda]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thereupon Father Lourdel rushed to the Kabaka and on bended knees urged him to reconsider, saying, "God wants free service.
The Uganda People's Congress (UPC) was dominated by Protestants and had its main power base in the north; the democratic party was dominated by Catholics and it was stronger in the south; Kabaka Yekka, a traditionalist party, was supported by the dominant Baganda tribe in the south.
For example, when the Kabaka ("king") presented a chief with any office, he would give him a drum, and the man so invested would be said to have "eaten" the drum.
The economy flourished under the moderate leadership of Prime Minister Milton Obote, and with the kabaka, or king, of Buganda assuming the largely ceremonial role of president, the political situation seemed remarkably stable.
90 Km Of Surathkal - Kabaka Road At Kadumata In Bantwal Taluk
Nnabagereka (queen) Sylvia of the Buganda Kingdom is redefining her role as the wife of the Kabaka (king) of the Buganda Kingdom.
The Kabaka of Buganda was the first person to make a call with the Buganda Kingdom's K2 Telecom.
In 1965/66, a crisis erupted between the central government (led by Prime Minister Milton Obote) and the Kingdom of Buganda (led by Edward Mutesa) who was both the Kabaka (King) of Buganda and the ceremonial president of Uganda.
Because white visitors to the area are rare, members of her expedition, organised by the Uganda 2000 group, were asked if they would honour the tribal king of the region, or Kabaka, by taking part in a traditional dance.
In competition with Muslims to win the souls of Africans, they gave the Kabaka (the king of Baganda) the opportunity to play Protestants, Catholics, and Muslims against each other, as the king sought to maintain power in a delicate political situation.
Luule to His Highness the Kabaka, 11-11-48 is a letter that shows clearly the breakdown of consensus as "the Christians wrote several letters to the Bishop imploring him to consult his Synod, but he refused .
1979, Kaikei Jyohou to Kabaka [Accounting Information and Stock Prices], Kaikei, 115: 491-503.